Search form

  • Travel Advice

Duke Resources

Duke resources to consider before travel.

Below you will find information and links to offices and units at Duke who play a role and support global travel. Duke Travelers - whether students, staff or faculty - are encouraged to consider all aspects of their travel and global engagement and to reach out to these resources for their assistance and advice well in advance of your planned departure.

Corporate Risk Management works to ensure the safety of the people and assets of Duke University, guarding them from risk of injury or financial loss. The Corporate Risk Management (CRM) office manages the various insurance programs for the University including property insurance, general liability insurance and automobile insurance as well as the International SOS Plan. CRM also works in partnership with Campus Police, the Occupational and Environmental Safety Office and the University Counsel's Office to evaluate potential hazards and risks.

Duke Visa Services works with federal and state government agencies, international organizations, and public and private entities to obtain appropriate visa documentation for admission to the United States, authorization for employment, and maintenance of legal status for our international population. Note: prior to traveling outside the United States, if you are an employee or scholar whose visa was sponsored by Duke to enter the U.S., you should check with your DVS Advisor far in advance of your planned travel as it may have an impact on your legal status in the U.S.

Employee Travel & Reimbursement serves as your primary contact for questions or issues related to employee and student reimbursements. Employee Travel & Reimbursement is also responsible for auditing all employee and student travel reimbursement requests to ensure compliance with Duke policy and the IRS regulations.

Export Controls ensures that Duke University is fully compliant with the Federal and State Laws and Regulations as it regards exports, including the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and other bodies of export regulations. Areas where Export Controls provides additional information, guidance and can faciliate license acquisition include Anti-Boycott, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Research and Conferences Overseas, Sanctioned Countries, Sending Goods Oversears and when Traveling with a Laptop. Duke faculty and staff should contact this office prior to engaging with individuals or entities in sanctioned countries (e.g., Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan and Syria). Export Control laws are complex and specific to each situation therefore Duke created this office to aid in compliance with these laws.

Office of Information Technology assists travelers who will be using Duke-owned or personal devices to access Duke resources from abroad. Travelers must be aware of the rules to follow in order to protect Duke's data and resources when remotely accessing data from off campus. OIT's Global IT Checklist provides advice and recommendations specifically for travelers and their Stay Safe While Traveling page.

Travel Abroad & Reentry to the United States

The Student and Exchange Visitor Program which governs the F-1 program and the Department of State which governs the J-1 program will now allow schools to issue electronic I-20s and DS-2019s to students and scholars overseas. The I-20s and DS-2019s must be printed and presented at the U.S. consulates and U.S. port of entry officials. Continuing students who did not request a travel signature before departing the U.S. can request a new I-20 or DS-2019, with signature, through Duke’s Terra Dotta Portal . If you need assistance, p lease email  [email protected] .

Due to our large international student population, the normal processing time for issuing a travel signature  document electronically  is 10 working days. We strongly recommend that students and scholars currently in the U.S. and preparing to travel, bring their I-20s or DS-2019s, passports and electronic I-94 records (click “the most recent I-94 section”)  to the Duke Visa Services Office for a travel signature to avoid processing delays.

The Duke University International Travel Policy requires that all faculty, staff, undergraduate and graduate/professional students enter their travel plans in the  Duke Travel Registry  if a trip abroad will be funded by, sponsored by, or entails earning credit to be transferred to Duke or used to earn a Duke degree. This University-wide policy applies to students in all programs at any of Duke's schools, institutes, departments, programs, and labs. Please check the Duke Travel Registry website for additional information.

Vocabulary And Terminology

Understand the difference between a Visa stamp, a visa document, and visa status.

VISA STAMP OR FOIL

A Visa Stamp in your passport gives you permission to enter the U.S. in a certain visa status. The modern, machine-readable "stamp" is not a stamp, but a specially designed "foil" affixed to a page in your passport and carries identity and other information. Many people still use the term "stamp," but consular officers may also use the term "visa foil. This entry stamp does not tell you how long you have permission to stay in the U.S.; it simply tells you how many times and for how long you have permission to apply for entry into the U.S. in that particular non-immigrant category.

For information on applying for a U.S. Visa, please see the  Department of State's U.S. Passports & International Travel  webpage.

VISA DOCUMENT

The non-immigrant document indicates how long you have permission to remain in the U.S., what activities you have permission to pursue, and where you have permission to pursue those activities. The non-immigrant document, alone, does not give you permission to enter the U.S., but you must have a valid non-immigrant document in order to obtain and use your visa stamp. The most common non-immigrant documents on a university campus are the I-20 for F status, the DS-2019 for J status, and the I-797 for E, H, O, or TN status.

VISA STATUS

The non-immigrant status or classification granted when admitted to the U.S., and reflected on your non-immigrant document and in your electronic I-94 record . The non-immigrant status or classification determines the nature, location, and duration of your authorized activities, as well as your authorized length of stay in the United States.

Travel Abroad

For specific guidelines for checking whether all of your documents are in order for travel, please review our  Visa Documents Guidelines  table.

Before entering your home country, you will need a valid passport, or some other acceptable proof that you are a citizen or legal resident of that country and have the right to return to and enter it.

Before entering another country, you should contact the country's consulate or embassy and obtain a visa, if one is required for citizens from your country of citizenship or lawful residence. One of the basic rights of any country under international law is the right to determine who may enter its borders, under what conditions and rules they may enter, and how long they may stay...

Contact the embassy or consulate of the country you plan to visit before you leave the U.S. in order to save yourself much time, trouble, expense, and disappointment at the border or airport. To obtain contact information for the embassy or consulate of the country you plan to visit, check the  Washington D.C. Embassies list . 

Reentry Into The United States

To reenter the United States you must have three things (for citizens of Canada, please review the "Exceptions to the Rules" section below):

  • A valid unexpired passport. Your passport must be valid for at least six months into the future each time you enter the United States. Please see the Study in the States website for information required for reentry to the U.S.  The Customs and Border Protection website provides entry information and a   list of countries  with six-month validity agreements that make the passport valid for six months beyond the expiration date listed in the passport.
  • An immigration document that is valid on and beyond the date you plan to reenter the U.S. and that has been signed and updated, if needed, by the appropriate official (Duke Visa Services Advisor). If you are in F or J status you must have a valid SEVIS Form I-20 or Form DS-2019. A Duke Visa Services Adviser’s most recent signature on the I-20 or DS-2019 should be less than one year old on the date that you plan to return to the U.S. (less than 6 months old if you are traveling while in F-1 OPT status). If you need an updated signature on the I-20 or DS-2019, visit or contact the Duke Visa Services Office before you leave.
  • If you are applying for an H or O visa stamp be sure to carry a copy of your approval notice and most recent I-94. PLEASE NOTE: Any time you apply for a visa or enter the U.S., you should be prepared to show proof that you have adequate financial support for the remainder of your program (i.e., assistantship award letter, bank statements, employment letter, etc.).
  • A valid and unexpired visa stamp in your passport that matches the immigration document. All visa stamps include a visa type, such as B-1, J-1, F-2, etc., and an ending date. It is imperative that you read the visa stamp carefully and make sure it is valid for reentry. The visa stamp may be valid for multiple entries or it may be limited to one or two entries. It may be valid for only a few months or for the entire time listed on the I-20, DS-2019, I-797 Approval Notice, or other visa document. The duration of the validity of the visa stamp and the number of entries it permits based upon reciprocity with the sending country. The restrictions the U.S. puts on your visa are similar to the restrictions that your country puts on the visas of U.S. citizens traveling to your country for similar purposes. Certain visa stamps may have other limitations as well.

Exceptions To The Rules

Persons in the lawful permanent resident (lpr) process (at any level).

Important Note:  If any of the situations listed below apply to you, discuss your travel plans with your Duke Visa Services advisor and/or an experienced immigration attorney before you travel.

Applicants for LPR or "green card": DO NOT TRAVEL  using temporary visa documents such as an I-20, DS-2019, I-797 Approval Notice for TN status, or TN documents. Once you file an application for LPR, your prior temporary status is generally considered canceled, and you should not use those old documents. If it is necessary for you to travel abroad while your LPR adjustment application is pending, you may need to apply for and receive "Advance Parole" from the DHS to give you special permission to enter the U.S. even though your temporary status has ended. If you leave the U.S. without Advance Parole, you may have no legal way to reenter and may have to wait outside the U.S. and complete your permanent residence processing at a U.S. embassy or consulate. There is a special exception for maintaining "H" status while LPR is pending.

Spouses of United States citizens and lawful permanent residents: DO NOT TRAVEL  using temporary visa documents such as an I-20, DS-2019, I-797, Approval Notice for TN status, or TN documents. Consular and immigration officers generally assume that marriage to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident indicates an intention to live in the U.S. permanently with the spouse. Consular and immigration officers have the authority to deny you a visa or deny you entry to the U.S. based on that assumption.

Others involved in the LPR process: DO NOT TRAVEL  unless you have discussed your situation with Duke Visa Services or with an experienced immigration lawyer. Certain actions that you take or that others take for you in the LPR process can make it difficult or impossible for you to return to the U.S. in a temporary status. These actions include, but are not limited to, filing a labor certification application, filing an immigrant petition based on family relationship, filing an immigrant petition based on employment, or filing an asylum application. Note that some of these actions may have been taken by you, but others may be taken by other people on your behalf.

CANADIAN CITIZENS

You must carry a passport and valid immigration documents (see chart above) to enter or reenter the U.S. You are required to carry a passport but are not required to have a valid visa stamp to reenter the U.S. When returning from Canada after short trips, be sure to check your electronic I-94 record to verify that you reentered in the appropriate visa status. You must present the proper non-immigrant documents to the immigration officer, EVEN IF THE IMMIGRATION OFFICER DOES NOT ASK TO SEE THEM. If you reenter as a tourist, all of the employment and other benefits connected to your old status are gone.

If you are attempting to reenter in TN status, remember that the TN requires that you have an intention to return to Canada. For more information, please review the "Exceptions to the Rules" section above.

AUTOMATIC REVALIDATION

The Department of State regulations have a special provision called "automatic revalidation" that permits persons in F, J, H and O status to enter "contiguous territory" (Canada and Mexico) and return to the U.S. without a currently valid visa stamp in the passport. For those who hold F and J status, this special "automatic revalidation" also applies to travel to "adjacent islands" (islands in the Caribbean except Cuba). Automatic revalidation applies in two ways.

  • If you have a visa stamp in your passport that matches your status, but has expired, that visa stamp is considered to be automatically revalidated to a current date for your return to the U.S. even though it has expired.
  • If you have changed status while in the U.S., and you have a visa stamp that matches your old status (either expired or unexpired), that visa stamp is considered to be automatically changed to a stamp matching the new status. It is also revalidated to a current date for your return to the U.S. even though it is not the same as your status and may have not expired. Automatic revalidation is a very useful and convenient provision, but it has very strict rules for its use. Do not even attempt to use automatic revalidation until you have read  Travel to Contiguous Territory and Adjacent Islands .

How To Avoid Problems

Multiple visa stamps.

If you have more than one visa stamp in your passport, be sure to use the correct one to enter the country.  When you reenter the United States, you are in the category in which you are admitted and which appears on your electronic I-94 record, regardless of what other stamps may be in your passport.

Example:  You have a B-1/B-2 tourist stamp and a J-1 stamp. You use the B-1/B-2 stamp to enter the U.S. because it is easier or you did not want to take time to get a proper J-1 stamp. If you use the B-1/B-2 stamp, then you are officially present in the U.S. in a tourist visa class, not J-1, even though you may have been in J-1 class before you left. If you enter in the wrong visa class, you cannot perform your designated activities or receive payments in the United States until DHS has changed your visa class back to one that permits your designated activities. This change can take many, many months, so be careful when entering!

VISA WAIVER PROGRAM

If you are a citizen of a country that participates in the Visa Waiver Program, meaning that you are allowed to enter the United States as a visitor without first obtaining a visa stamp, be sure that you do NOT enter the United States on this program.  If you enter on this program, you will be admitted as a WT or WB and will only be allowed to remain in the United States for a maximum of 90 days. You will not be eligible for employment and other benefits normally afforded persons in other temporary visa classifications. A WB or WT cannot be changed to another visa status, nor can it be extended beyond the 90-day period. PLEASE REMEMBER that entry on the Visa Waiver Program in WB or WT status cannot be "fixed" in the United States. You will have to leave the U.S. and return in proper status.  No exceptions!

GET A VISA STAMP

If you go to a United States embassy or consulate abroad to get a visa stamp, take the proper immigration documents with you.  If you do not have the proper document, such as the I-20, DS-2019, or I-797 Approval Notice, the consular officer has no evidence that you are entitled to that visa and cannot issue it. It does not matter that you may already have an old visa stamp in the passport. The old stamp provides no information about your current situation.  Always check the Visa Wait times-For Interview Appointments and Processing  from the  Department of State  website and note that additional time may be required for administrative processing..

INVALID OR EXPIRED VISA STAMP

Do not attempt to enter the United States with an invalid or expired visa stamp or no visa stamp at all.  If you try to enter the U.S. with an invalid or expired visa stamp or with no proper stamp at all, the immigration officer at the port of entry has two choices: (1) deny you entry and send you back on the next plane; or (2) call a supervising officer and request permission to let you in without a visa. If, and only if, the supervising officer agrees, may you be admitted without a visa stamp. You must pay a fee to cover the cost of this visa waiver request. DHS will make a record that you failed to present a proper visa stamp and that DHS gave you a visa waiver. If you again try to reenter the United States without a visa, you likely will be denied entry. Often you must wait until all of the other passengers on your plane, train, or bus have been admitted before DHS can take time to complete your admission. It may take several hours to do this. Reports from other students and scholars indicate that your wait will not be pleasant.

IMMIGRATION DOCUMENTS

Do not attempt to enter the United States without the proper immigration document.  If you fail to present a valid visa document, such as an I-20 or DS-2019, and you try to enter the United States, the immigration officer has two choices: (1) deny you entry and send you back on the next plane: or (2) to admit you for a very short period of time, usually 30 days. In the latter case, you will be issued a Form I-515 that requires you mail the appropriate documents to DHS before the expiration of your electronic I-94. If you are issued an I-515, then you need to contact an advisor in the Duke Visa Services Office immediately for assistance. Failure to respond to an I-515 in a timely manner is a violation of status and could be grounds for deportation.

NON-IMMIGRANT CATEGORY

Do not attempt to enter the U.S. in the wrong non-immigrant category with the intention of changing it to the correct one later.  Some people enter the U.S. in the wrong non-immigrant class because it is easier, or faster, or they are not sure they will be able to get the proper visa. They then plan to change to the proper class after they arrive in the U.S. Examples: entering the U.S. as a tourist when the real intention is to enroll as a student or to change to J or H class in order to work. Generally, this is considered visa fraud, and the DHS will examine very closely any application to change non-immigrant category under these circumstances. In addition, you cannot work or attend school until you have obtained the proper class and the necessary approval. Therefore, it is imperative that you enter in the proper non-immigrant category avoid long delays and possible unpleasant exchanges with DHS.

Other Helpful Information

  • Travel to Contiguous Territory and Adjacent Island

Earn Course Credit All Around the World

Make the most of your academic path, learn more about yourself, and experience authentic intercultural immersion when you study away.

Search Our Duke-In Programs

  • Arts & Humanities
  • Arts and Media
  • Art History
  • Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
  • Classical Studies
  • Creative Writing
  • Documentary Studies
  • French and Francophone Studies
  • Germanic Languages and Literature
  • Global Cultural Studies
  • Italian Studies
  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Portuguese, Brazilian and Global
  • Religious Studies
  • Slavic and Eurasian Studies
  • Spanish and Latin American Studies
  • Theater Studies
  • Engineering
  • Civil & Environmental
  • Electrical & Computer
  • Global Health
  • Natural Sciences
  • Computer Science
  • Earth and Ocean Sciences
  • Environmental Science and Policy
  • Evolutionary Anthropology
  • Mathematics
  • Psychology and Neuroscience
  • Statistical Science
  • Social Sciences
  • African and African American Studies
  • Cultural Anthropology
  • Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies
  • Health Policy
  • International Comparative Studies
  • Linguistics
  • Markets and Management Studies
  • Political Science
  • Public Policy
  • Innovation & Entrepreneurship
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • North America
  • South America

Duke administers over 40 of its own study away programs. Get started finding the best fit for you.

At Duke, we believe the best international study abroad and U.S.-based study away programs deliver high caliber academics, a strong support system, and the chance to integrate intellectual inquiry into a mosaic of cultural and personal experiences.

duke travel office

STUDENT EXPERIENCE: PLAN & PREPARE

Program recommendations by area of study.

Looking for a study away experience with an emphasis on courses in your discipline? Use these links to browse study away/abroad opportunities by areaof study. Browse these program recommendations by area of study for a quick guide to summer and semester programs – both Duke-In and Duke-Approved.

Raia Lockman sitting in a desert

COVID-19 & Study AWay

Covid-19 & study away.

Duke’s Global Education Office re-started its global education programs in Fall 2021. After carefully studying the public health recommendations and incorporating risk-mitigating steps, GEO returned students to the field. We continue to monitor COVID-19 public health responses around the world through our partnership with experts from Duke’s Undergraduate Health and Safety Support team and consulting with officials at peer institutions, the U.S. State Department, private-sector international security experts, and other relevant Duke University offices. 

masked student in front of the mona lisa

STUDENT EXPERIENCE: IDENTITY & DIVERSITY

Video: 'out in the world' study away q+a with lgbtqia+ identifying duke students.

Interested in studying abroad but have questions about LGBTQIA+ topics in an international context? In this video, a panel of Duke students who have studied abroad talk about their experience as an LGBTQIA+ identifying person outside of the U.S.  

Head shots of students featured in video

Study Away Programs Offering Coursework with an Internship, Research, or Independent Study Component

If you are an undergraduate looking for an internship, research opportunity, independent study program, or other practicum experience, check out the options available through courses on study away programs.  

students having a meeting in modern office

DUKE-IN PROGRAMS ON 6 CONTINENTS

For any major and every interest, there’s a study away program that matches your needs. Whether you have experience with a foreign language or not, you can earn course credit in subjects like engineering, economics, public policy, biology, history, and computer science, just to name a few.

duke travel office

GEO ADVISING IS HERE FOR YOU

Get advice on choosing a program, exploring courses and credits, and covering the costs of study away when you engage the Global Education Office's advising network.

duke travel office

Upcoming Events

To Duke Alumni homepage

Explore the world with duke, duke travels.

Duke Travels is your destination for excellence in educational travel. Journey along with Duke alumni, parents and friends to fascinating places to learn and connect with Duke faculty and host leaders. Our learning adventures combine enriching itineraries, behind-the-scenes visits and stimulating lectures within the context of safety and sustainability.

Where do you want to travel next with Duke?

Your Environment

Your Questions

To learn more about our travel program or any of our upcoming travels, please contact us at [email protected] or 919-684-2988.

You can also view our list of FAQs here .

Upcoming Travels

All alumni travel.

Vietnam saigon market with people

Vietnam by Land and by Sea

Journey through Vietnam, where natural beauty, sacred rituals, and cultural wonders come together on an exceptional 14-day expedition that includes a 7-night cruise from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, to Hanoi. This program features guest speakers Kim Phuc, famously photographed as a child in 1972 Vietnam; Nick Ut, the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer who took that iconic image; and Jim Laurie, a TV news correspondent during the Vietnam War. Enhance your experience with the Siam Reap and Cambodia Pre-Program Option.

Whale and her calf

Baja: Among the Great Whales

Venture to Baja California and the Sea of Cortez to enter the California gray whale birthing lagoons of Bahía Magdalena for close encounters with these gentle giants―a rare privilege in the natural world. Go aboard the 100-guest expedition ship National Geographic Venture to get up close with whales, snorkel among sea lions, stand-up paddle board, and hike the pristine desert islands dotting the Sea of Cortez.

duke travel office

Machu Picchu to the Galapagos

Machu Picchu’s enigmatic ruins and the fascinating Galapagos Islands rank among South America’s greatest treasures, and a small group tour is the ideal way to experience both.  This outstanding 16-day adventure begins with Lima’s highlights.  Traverse the magnificent Sacred Valley, visiting impressive Incan sites and indigenous villages during a two-night stay.  After taking a scenic train ride to Machu Picchu, tour and absorb this astounding site on two separate days, overnighting nearby.  Then encounter the history and beauty of Cuzco and Quito,

Havana Vintage Automobiles

Havana: featuring the Afro-Cuban Experience

Discover the profound influence of the African diaspora on Cuban culture! Daily excursions will broaden your perspective of Cuba while benefiting and supporting the local people. Visit Guanabacoa and Matanzas, rich with Afro-Cuban history. Enjoy Havana’s jazz and art scenes, and learn about the Santería religion. Meet entrepreneurs, professionals and community leaders who share their experiences during meaningful conversations.

Helsinki Finland

Finland: Arctic Magnificence

Embrace Finland’s majestic beauty and Nordic charm on this seven-night, active journey! Explore vibrant Helsinki and indulge in the quintessentially Finnish tradition of a rejuvenating sauna. In northern Lapland, gaze at the awe-inspiring Northern Lights from your glass-domed cabin, plus enjoy a snowshoe trek by moonlight and a fast-paced dogsled ride across the pristine fjells. You’ll also tour the splendid old town of Tallinn, Estonia! Includes first-class hotels and a round-trip flight within Finland.

Prince Abbas cruise

Egypt & the Eternal Nile

Accompanied by an expert Egyptian guide, this singular 15-day small group journey through antiquity reveals a storied land’s treasures.  In Cairo, visit Memphis’s open-air museum, splendid Sakkara, and the astounding Pyramids of Giza with their Great Sphinx.  After touring Aswan’s massive dam, embark on a fascinating four-night Lake Nasser cruise through ancient Nubia, exploring the outstanding temples at Philae, New Kalabsha, Wadi el-Seboua, Amada, and Abu Simbel – the setting for a dramatic sound-and-light show.  Return to Aswan for a classic three-ni

What You Need To Do Before Traveling Abroad on Behalf of Duke

Students, faculty and staff traveling internationally for Duke are required to enter their plans in the university’s travel registry

An airplane taking off.

After the attacks by Hamas in Israel on Saturday, Oct. 7, Christy Parrish and her team in Global Affairs immediately logged into Duke's Travel Registry to find any students, faculty or staff in the area. 

The search came back with no results.

By Monday, however, Parrish knew otherwise. More than a dozen members of the Duke community were in Israel and the West Bank with Duke Support, but they had not entered their trip in Duke's Travel Registry , which Duke the university consults in an emergency to identify individuals and determine if assistance can be provided.

It was only through word of mouth and the Office of Information Technology (OIT) checking if Duke users logged in from within the area that Parrish, Director of Global Travel Policies and Incident Manager, was able to begin tracking down students, faculty, staff and alumni who were in Israel or Palestinian Territories. Parrish began checking on their safety, offering assistance and inquiring as to their plans for leaving the country following the university's travel restriction to the entirety of Palestinian territories and the country of Israel. 

"You want that help as fast as you can," Parrish said. "It makes all the difference. If we see something awful happen, and we see in the Duke Travel Registry system that you're there, we're going to include you in outreach. Do you need evacuation? Do you need search and rescue? Are you not responding? Our office does that. We call. We email. We text. We call your emergency contact. We call your department and colleagues to see if they've heard from the traveler."

duke travel office

Students, faculty and staff who travel abroad with Duke support are required to enter their plans with the university's travel registry in advance of departure. This includes any trip for which financial and logistical support, academic approval, granting of credit for activity or work completed based on the travel, offering mentorship or there is any kind of material role for Duke in the travel. Registering enables Duke's responders to locate people, and it is the first step to connect travelers with the university's provider, International SOS . The service provides medical, safety and security services as well as evacuation and repatriation of remains services. They have their own international clinics, remote-site medical facilities across five continents and their own fleet of medical evacuation airplanes with medical staff onboard. 

Trips are automatically added to the registry when travel is booked using the university's Concur purchasing system , but travelers can also manually enter their trip itinerary and flight information if booked on their own. The quick task of adding an itinerary in the registry at travel.duke.edu , Parrish said, not only complies with Duke's Global Travel Policy but also provides a wealth of resources to prepare for a trip and serves as a support system while abroad.

Once registered, International SOS will provide a report on a destination, including history, holidays, medical care locations and where to find English speakers should you need services such a medical clinics or pharmacies. Then, while traveling abroad, the service can provide emergency support in case of a medical issue, stolen passport or evacuation in the event of a natural disaster or act of terrorism. International SOS can even provide mental health counselors if you're in crisis abroad as well.

For Beth Ray-Schroeder, Senior Director of Duke Travels at Duke Alumni Engagement and Development , the Duke Travel Registry has been a staple of her pre-trip checklist for years as she regularly travels internationally for work and plans international travel programs for alumni led by faculty and staff. The registry provides peace of mind that she or the travelers will get the support and information they need in an emergency abroad. 

She's experienced with how International SOS can quickly take control in a scary situation and provide support by connecting travelers with doctors and services on the ground immediately. But International SOS offers more than just logistics, she said. It also provides a sense of relief and care when you may be on your own in a foreign city. 

"There's no predicting what can happen when you're abroad," Ray-Schroeder said. "When these emergencies happen, they happen in real-time. What I hear most is not only that the assistance is there, but it's just this feeling that 'I'm not alone, not isolated.' It does help. It's comforting."

While registering is required for anybody traveling abroad with Duke support, students, faculty and staff traveling internationally for personal reasons can also add their trip to the registry and purchase personal coverage from International SOS at a discount. 

The travel registry and International SOS serve as a critical lifeline back to Duke and the United States in case something goes wrong. Without it, you may find yourself on your own when you need assistance most. 

"You don't expect to have an emergency. You don't expect to get in a car accident. You don't expect to trip on a curb and break a leg," Parrish said. "If it's a serious health event, you want that help as fast as you can get it. It makes all the difference."

Submit your next international trip to the travel registry

Send story ideas, shout-outs and photographs through  our story idea form  or write  [email protected] .

Follow Working@Duke on  X (Twitter) , Facebook, and  Instagra m .

  • FINANCIAL SERVICES HOME

Search form

It is the intent of Duke to reimburse travelers for necessary and reasonable expenses incurred while traveling on Duke related business. Reimbursement of travel expenses will be fair and equitable; it is Duke's expectation that employees and students should neither lose nor gain financially when traveling on official business. Duke is not obligated to reimburse employees or students for expenses that are not in compliance with Duke's policy.

Management centers, schools, or departments may choose to impose greater control than required at the corporate level, but their requirements, at a minimum, should include Duke's corporate requirements.

News & Events

Accounts payable & employee travel and reimbursements offices are moving, we are moving.

Corporate Accounts Payable (AP) and Employee Travel & Reimbursement (ET&R) will be relocating to 705 Broad Street during the last week of September. Movers will be onsite starting Thursday, September 28; therefore, offices will be closed to walk-in customers on Thursday and Friday of that week.

Employee Travel and Reimbursement Fiscal Year End Updates FY 2023

Employee Travel and Reimbursement (ET&R) has included updates for the 2023 fiscal year end process. Please use the information below as a reference for the fiscal year end schedule related to out of pocket reimbursements, corporate card charges, and experimental subject payment forms.

*Please note; for consistency all reimbursement forms/expense reports are due to ET&R by 5:00pm on Thursday, June 15, 2023. This is a change from prior fiscals years.

Concur Expense - New User Interface

Employee Travel & Reimbursement is excited to announce the upcoming migration of Concur Expense to the NextGen User Interface (UI) on Monday, May 2, 2022. The transition to the new UI requires no action on the part of Concur users and will have no impact on expense reports created utilizing the current user interface.

Corporate Card Information

For information regarding the Corporate Card, please refer to the  Corporate Card website .

Departmental TRaC Representative

For information related to your departmental TRaC Representatives, please refer to the  Departmental TRaC Representatives webpage .

Military Time Conversion Chart

If you need assistance in converting time to 24-hour time, please refer to  this chart .

Preferred Travel Services

If you are seeking information on Duke's preferrred travel services, please refer to the  Procurement website .

Christelle Gonthier, the director of the Duke in Paris summer program, takes an afternoon shot of the Eiffel Tower.

New EU Travel Program Requiring US Citizens to Register

The program, initially slated for 2021, will soon go into effect in 2024.

-By Chuck Givens

July 27, 2023

The European Union is implementing a new travel authorization program called the European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS) , which will require U.S. citizens to register and pay a fee before traveling. The program is intended to strengthen border security and will officially begin in October 2024.

For members of the Duke community, this new requirement can have a major impact. In 2022, 1,246 individual trips were taken by members of the Duke community to EU countries.

Christelle Gonthier, the director of the Duke in Paris summer program, takes an afternoon shot of the Eiffel Tower.

The ETIAS will apply to U.S. citizens and citizens from 60 other countries who currently travel to Europe visa-free. This includes countries like Australia, Canada, Mexico, and New Zealand. The full list of affected countries can be found via this link: etias.com/etias-requirements

The application fee is estimated to be €7 for adults between the ages of 18 and 70, with some exemptions. The application will be available online and is expected to take roughly 10 minutes to complete. Applicants will need to provide passport information, travel dates, contact information, and answer some security-based questions.

“DUKE TRAVELERS WILL HAVE TO DO A BIT MORE PLANNING”

Once an application has been submitted, an email confirmation should arrive within 96 hours.  However, an approval can take longer and travelers are cautioned to allow up to three weeks for the approval.  If a traveler does not have an ETIAS authorization, they will not be allowed to travel to countries within the European Union.

“This will definitely mean Duke travelers will have to do a bit more planning in advance of visiting the EU than in the past,” notes Christy Parrish, Director of Global Travel Policies and Incident Management in the Office of Global Affairs. “Coming out of the pandemic, we’re experiencing record travel numbers. One thing we’ve learned is that countries are instituting new entry requirements, so it’s not surprising the EU is making this change as well,” said Parrish.

ETIAS authorization is valid for three years or until the passport expires, whichever comes first. Travelers can visit EU countries multiple times within the three-year period without needing to reapply. Those wishing to apply for ETIAS online can do so up to 90 days before the scheduled travel date.

However, it is important to stress that the ETIAS is not a visa. It is a travel authorization that allows visa-free travelers to enter the Schengen Zone .

For more information, head to the ETIAS website via this link: etias.com

duke travel office

Duke Policy on Travel to DKU

Duke University (“Duke”) faculty and staff will routinely travel to Duke Kunshan University (“DKU”) in Kunshan, China to teach, work, promote academic, cultural, and scientific exchange, conduct business, present lectures, and attend conferences, seminars and other business meetings. This policy is designed to ensure cost-effective and equitable purchase of airline tickets and other common expenses, and that travel and in-country support is coordinated with DKU, proper visa and immigration regulations are followed, and related expenses are monitored.

  • This policy applies to all Duke faculty and staff traveling to DKU (“Duke Traveler”) regardless of the trip purpose, source of funds or length of visit.
  • The Duke-DKU Travel Form  should be completed for all trips and submitted to the Duke Office of DKU Relations ("DODR").
  • Per the Duke Global Travel Policy , individuals traveling internationally are required to enter travel dates, destination(s), supporting Duke unit(s), and emergency contact information into the Duke Travel Registry prior to departure.
  • Duke Travelers who will be teaching, conducting research or providing a service that will be paid or reimbursed by DKU are required to travel under a short-term business or work visa/permit (i.e., not a tourist or other type of visa). DODR will assist Duke Travelers with securing the appropriate entry document(s) in accordance with Chinese immigration laws and taking into consideration any other travel, personal or work related, during your assignment that would necessitate more than one entry to China.
  • Exceptions to this policy will be handled through individual appointment/assignment letters or by approval of the appropriate Duke or DKU administrator.

Travel Funded by Duke University

The  Duke-DKU Travel Form   should be completed for all trips and submitted to DODR. Travel should be approved in advance by the Duke sponsoring entity and confirmed in advance with DKU.

Duke Travelers should follow normal Employee Travel and Reimbursement policies and processes for Foreign Travel and Payments Related to Obtaining Travel Documentation .

  • Duke Travelers should follow normal Employee Travel and Reimbursement policies and processes for Foreign Travel. If the traveler has a Duke Corporate Card with travel privileges, the Duke Corporate Card should be used to pay for travel related expenses.
  • Duke permits but does not require or guarantee business class travel on transcontinental flights. The class of service for travel to China is decided by the Duke entity sponsoring and funding the trip.

Ground Transportation and Lodging

  • Duke Travelers should follow normal Employee Travel and Reimbursement policies and processes for Foreign Travel.
  • DKU will coordinate ground transportation to/from the airport in China.
  • DKU will make lodging arrangements for the Duke Traveler.

Travel Funded by Duke Kunshan University

The DKU Travel Form should be completed for all trips and submitted to DODR as far in advance of the trip as possible, preferably 60 days. Travel should be approved in advance by DKU.

  • Generally, DKU will make reservations based on the Duke Traveler’s preferences and make payment directly to the airline for approved travel.
  • DKU does not guarantee that the Duke Traveler’s preferred airline carrier will be selected.
  • DKU permits but does not require or guarantee business class travel on transcontinental flights.
  • Generally, DKU will provide Duke faculty and Duke staff at the director level and above one roundtrip business class ticket per year between the airport closest to their home and Shanghai Pudong International Airport (PVG), which typically involves only one stop in a major hub. For those with approved business class travel, two economy or economy plus tickets can be provided , one for the employee and one for a dependent traveling with the employee between the airport closest to their home and PVG.    [Due to post-COVID travel complexities, travelers should reference their assignment letter for their DKU approved travel details.]
  • DKU will provide all Duke staff below the director level an economy or economy plus airfare for each assignment between the airport closest to their home and PVG. For those Duke Travelers with written approval from Duke to fly business class, DKU will provide $1,500 and the Duke sponsoring entity may provide funding for the balance when airfares are back to normal.
  • Travel expenses such as lodging during layovers or rental cars will only be reimbursed if they are approved by DKU during the airfare booking process.
  • DKU does not guarantee coverage of fees associated with flight changes at the request of the Duke Traveler.

Visa and Passport

  • Fees associated with securing the appropriate entry visa to China (including the travel to the Embassy in Washington, DC, if required), photographs, mailing, visa expediting and fees imposed by the Embassy or Consulate, will be reimbursed by DKU.
  • Passport fees, including renewal, adding pages or securing a second passport, are the responsibility of the Duke Traveler. Faculty discretionary funds may be used to pay for these fees if there is an immediate business purpose. Fees for any trusted traveler programs are a personal expense.
  • Fees associated with accompanying dependents, including the costs of passport(s), entry visa fees, work or residency permits, remain the responsibility of the Duke Traveler. Faculty discretionary funds may not be used to pay for these costs.

Duke Corporate Card

  • While in China, the Duke Traveler should not use their Duke Corporate Card unless conducting Duke-specific business activities. The DKU accounting team will provide reimbursement for DKU expenses by means of direct payments to vendors, an advance from petty cash or cash reimbursement.
  • DKU will provide lodging arrangements at no cost to the Duke Traveler.

Ground Transportation

  • Reimbursement will be provided for the cost of transportation to/from the Duke Traveler’s home to RDU International Airport. If personal funds are used, proper documentation can be provided to the DKU Accounting Team for immediate reimbursement.
  • DKU will coordinate and pay for ground transportation to/from the airport in China.
  • With advanced notice, DKU can coordinate ground transportation to/from the airport for dependents traveling separately but the cost will be the responsibility of the Duke Traveler and must be paid directly to DKU. The Duke Traveler will pay DKU for this service with cash.
  • DKU provides a free shuttle bus for local transportation. DKU will not reimburse travelers for rental cars in China.
  • Reimbursement will be provided for meals incurred on the day of air travel to/from DKU. If personal funds are used, proper documentation can be provided to the DKU Accounting Team for immediate reimbursement.
  • For trips lasting up to two weeks for the visitors providing operational support to DKU, a DKU meal card will be provided by DKU to travelers for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Meals purchased outside of DKU will be reimbursable by DKU with proper documentation (e.g., Fapiao for purchases within China) according to DKU’s Travel and Hospitality Standards.
  • For trips lasting more than two weeks, no meal cards are provided. Meals are considered a personal expense and will not be reimbursed. Subsidized on-campus dining is available at approximately $14 per day.

Employee Health Travel Clinic

  • For trips under 90 days, the Duke Traveler has the option to have a basic travel visit to review health and immunization history and to get immunizations and travel prescriptions.  Related expenses will be covered by DKU.
  • For trips over 90 days, the Duke Traveler is required to have a DKU Travel/Work Permit exam.  Related expenses will be covered by DKU.
  • To schedule an appointment with the travel clinic within Employee Occupational Health and Wellness (EOHW), call 919.684.3136. Complete the Travel Questionnaire online through the EOHW website and forward the appointment date to the Duke Office of DKU Relations. The Duke Office of DKU Relations will provide the required IR Form for the visit.

Incidentals

  • Converters/adapters are not a reimbursable expense by DKU.
  • Wi-Fi service on flights to/from DKU is not a reimbursable expense by DKU without written justification.

Direct questions about this policy to DODR at [email protected].  

IMAGES

  1. Duke Travel

    duke travel office

  2. Duke Travel Groepsreizen, Schoolreizen en Bedrijfsuitjes

    duke travel office

  3. Duke Travel bv

    duke travel office

  4. 25 Travel Agency Office Interior Designs You Must See

    duke travel office

  5. Duke Travel

    duke travel office

  6. OfficeWorks

    duke travel office

COMMENTS

  1. Global Administrative and Travel Support

    Our office offers faculty, staff, and students resources that aid in planning and implementing successful global travel, whether individual travel or a group trip. ... To be notified of updates to Duke's Global Travel Policy and Restricted Regions List, please send your name and email to [email protected]. Travel Registry.

  2. Our Office

    Please contact Global Administrative and Travel Support at [email protected] if you encounter difficulty in accessing the travel registry or if you have travel related questions. Ms. Christy Parrish. Senior Manager, Global Administrative and Travel Support. [email protected] or by phone at 919.684.2910. Mr. Schuyler Knowles, J.D.

  3. Passports & Visas

    Passports & Visas. In an effort to ensure Duke employees adhere to the immigration laws of countries they plan to visit when conducting their research, collaborations and teaching, the Office of Global Administrative and Travel Support can assist travelers with their travel documentation. Travel documentation ranges from a basic passport, to an ...

  4. Travel Clinics

    Ideally, your visit to a travel clinic should take place 4- to 6-weeks before you leave the country and for post-travel, as soon as possible for an injury or illness contracted abroad. The Duke Travel Clinic is located at 234 Crooked Creek Parkway, Suite 520, Durham NC 27713 and can be reached by phone at +1.919.385.5500 or scheduled through ...

  5. Duke Travel Office Joins Global Affairs

    The two offices are set to work more directly on future projects and initiatives-By Chuck Givens. April 7, 2022. On April 1 st, 2022, the Office of Global Affairs officially added the Duke Office of Global Administrative and Travel Support (GATS) under its umbrella.The move brings two new members into the OGA family: Christy Parrish and Schuyler Knowles.

  6. Duke Resources

    Duke Travelers - whether students, staff or faculty - are encouraged to consider all aspects of their travel and global engagement and to reach out to these resources for their assistance and advice well in advance of your planned departure. Corporate Risk Management works to ensure the safety of the people and assets of Duke University ...

  7. Duke Travel Registry

    The Duke Travel Registry, along with additional travel resources, can be accessed on the Duke Global Travel website at https://travel.duke.edu/. Duke Office of DKU Relations 402 Chapel Drive, Box 90036 Page Auditorium, Suite 214 Durham, NC 27708

  8. International SOS (ISOS): Emergency and Travel ...

    To help safeguard university travelers, Duke has contracted with a travel assistance company called International SOS (ISOS), which provides emergency assistance and other services for all students (both Duke and non-Duke students) studying abroad on Duke programs. These services include access to: Medical, dental, and mental health experts.

  9. Travel Information

    The Duke University International Travel Policy requires that all faculty, staff, undergraduate and graduate/professional students enter their travel plans in the Duke Travel Registry if a trip abroad will be funded by, sponsored by, or entails earning credit to be transferred to Duke or used to earn a Duke degree.

  10. Duke International Travel Restrictions Eased As COVID Cases Decline

    By Duke Today Staff. International travel will significantly open up to Duke scholars under new travel rules put in place March 25. The changes constitute the most significant loosening of international travel restrictions since the university put a world-wide travel suspension because of COVID in early 2020.

  11. Travel Abroad & Reentry to the United States

    A Duke Visa Services Adviser's most recent signature on the I-20 or DS-2019 should be less than one year old on the date that you plan to return to the U.S. (less than 6 months old if you are traveling while in F-1 OPT status). If you need an updated signature on the I-20 or DS-2019, visit or contact the Duke Visa Services Office before you ...

  12. Employee Travel & Reimbursement

    Employee Travel & Reimbursement is also responsible for auditing all employee and student travel reimbursement requests to ensure compliance with Duke policy and the IRS regulations. Duke is not obligated to reimburse employees or students for expenses that are not in compliance with Duke's policy. ... Office Hours: Customer Service hours are ...

  13. HOME PAGE

    Duke administers over 40 of its own study away programs. Get started finding the best fit for you. At Duke, we believe the best international study abroad and U.S.-based study away programs deliver high caliber academics, a strong support system, and the chance to integrate intellectual inquiry into a mosaic of cultural and personal experiences.

  14. Duke Travels

    Duke Travels is your destination for excellence in educational travel. Journey along with Duke alumni, parents and friends to fascinating places to learn and connect with Duke faculty and host leaders. Our learning adventures combine enriching itineraries, behind-the-scenes visits and stimulating lectures within the context of safety and ...

  15. What You Need To Do Before Traveling Abroad on Behalf of Duke

    Students, faculty and staff who travel abroad with Duke support are required to enter their plans with the university's travel registry in advance of departure. This includes any trip for which financial and logistical support, academic approval, granting of credit for activity or work completed based on the travel, offering mentorship or there ...

  16. DKU Travel to Duke

    Our office helps support DKU visitors and Duke offices inviting DKU visitors to campus. We will help maximize the effectiveness of these visits, working with Duke Visa Services as appropriate to ensure proper visa and immigration regulations are followed, and that travel and in-country support is coordinated (lodging, ground transportation and ...

  17. Travel

    Please contact Teia Moore at 919-684-2522 if you have an urgent need during this time. Procurement will be closed on Friday, 12/29/23 and Monday, 1/1/24. We will have coverage Friday, 12/29 from 9am-2pm for urgent Health System orders. Please contact Jesse Alston at 919-684-6883 if you have an urgent need during this time.

  18. Duke Travel to DKU

    STUDENTS. Duke students travel to DKU for short-term study programs, to attend conferences and events, or to visit campus. Student travel to DKU is coordinated through our office both for student groups and for individual student visitors, with the exception of students enrolled in DKU graduate programs and Duke undergraduates participating in the Duke-In DKU study away program managed by the ...

  19. Travel Insurance

    Cigna Global Health Benefits' Medical Benefits Abroad® (MBA) offers eligible Duke employees and dependents supplemental benefit coverage for unexpected injuries and illnesses that may occur while traveling internationally on Duke business for six months or less. Coverage under the plan is available without enrollment and at no additional cost ...

  20. New EU Travel Program Requiring US Citizens to Register

    The program, initially slated for 2021, will soon go into effect in 2024-By Chuck Givens. July 27, 2023. The European Union is implementing a new travel authorization program called the European Travel Information and Authorization System (ETIAS), which will require U.S. citizens to register and pay a fee before traveling.The program is intended to strengthen border security and will ...

  21. Duke Policy on Travel to DKU

    To schedule an appointment with the travel clinic within Employee Occupational Health and Wellness (EOHW), call 919.684.3136. Complete the Travel Questionnaire online through the EOHW website and forward the appointment date to the Duke Office of DKU Relations. The Duke Office of DKU Relations will provide the required IR Form for the visit.