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  • Ryokan Stay in Kinosaki
  • Kinosaki's Community with Tourism
  • Kinosaki Onsen's Brief History
  • Strolling the Town in Yukata
  • The 7 Mystic Onsen
  • Tattoo Friendly Onsen of Kinosaki
  • Coastal Kinosaki - Hiyoriyama
  • Beach & Seaside Town - Takeno
  • Shopping, Dining, Stork Sanctuary - Toyooka
  • Castle Town - Izushi
  • Mountains & Ski Areas - Kannabe
  • Farming Village - Tanto
  • Ancient Kyoto - Kyotango
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  • Articles to Inspire Your Trip
  • National Treasure – The Oriental White Stork
  • Getting to Kinosaki
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  • Onsen etiquette
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Kinosaki Onsen

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Kinosaki Onsen (��艷��) is located in northern Hyogo Prefecture on the coast of the Sea of Japan. This pleasant town, built along a willow-lined river, is one of the top onsen destinations of the Kansai Region .

Hot springs were discovered in Kinosaki around the 8th century and since then the town has developed into a charmingly old-fashioned onsen town . In the evenings guests of the local ryokan stroll about town in yukata and geta (wooden clogs), visiting the numerous public baths and nostalgic game arcades .

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How to Visit the Kinosaki Onsens [Onsen Guide + Map]

Kinosaki is known as the best onsen town in Japan.  Its natural hot springs, cherry tree-lined canal, and traditional architecture will have you delighted before you even get to an onsen.  You can visit Kinosaki on a day trip, or stay for longer (which I recommend), but one of the best things to do in Kinosaki is to visit the onsens or public baths here then you’ll want to know what to expect in each onsen, and how to visit them.  Come to Kinosaki and try an onsen Meguri – a pilgrimage where you walk around and soak in all 7 of the Kinosaki onsens.   Here’s my guide to the Kinosaki Onsens, how to visit the onsens of Kinosaki, and all you need to know to visit them.

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN COMPENSATED AND AFFILIATE LINKS MORE INFORMATION IN  OUR DISCLAIMER

Visiting Kinosaki Onsens on a Day Trip

If you are visiting Kinosaki on a day trip, take a look and see which of the onsens are open and what hours.  There’s information at the JR Station.  Leave your bags at the JR station with either left luggage or in a coin locker and head to your first onsen.  Buy a day pass, and begin your onsen adventure!

Visiting Kinosaki Onsens and Staying Overnight

If you are staying overnight in Kinosaki, it’s best to try and check in to your ryokan first.   You’ll be able to leave your bags and also change into the ryokan-provided Yukata for a true Kinosaki experience. Once you’ve checked in your ryokan will provide you with your day pass, change into your yukata, don a pair of wooden Japanese sandals, and begin your exploration.  You’ll never be as clean as this ever again!

#1 THING TO DO

Ryokan Onsen

Stay in a Ryokan with a Private Onsen

This 150-year-old Ryokan is built in the style of a Japanese tea house, some rooms open onto the garden and some have private onsens (book early for those)

  • My guide to the best ryokans to stay at in Kinosaki is here
  • Want to know what it’s like to stay in a ryokan onsen?  Then read my ryokan experience here
  • My guide to ryokan etiquette is here.
  • And if you’re staying longer in Kinosaki you’ll want to check out my guide on what to do in Kinosaki

You can usually check in at your ryokan at around 3 pm and it’s considered rude to be either early or late.  When you stay at the ryokans that we’ve recommended in Kinosaki, you get a free pass to visit the 7 public onsens in Kinosaki and it is valid from 15:00 on your day of arrival until 15:30 on your day of check out.

Kinosaki onsen Town

The Onsens of Kinosaki Onsen Town

There are 7 public onsens in Kinosaki Onsen Town.  Not all are open every day, each having at least one rest day per week, which is always published.  Here are the details of the 7 public onsens in Kinosaki.

Goshono-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening times of Goshono-Yu: 07:00 – 23:00

Closed days of Goshonu-Yu: 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month

One of the most popular onsens in Kinosaki, there is an outdoor stone bath – it looks like a rock pool, but with underwater seats – with a waterfall.    Goshonu-Yu was modeled on the Imperial Palace in Kyoto and is truly lovely.  The indoor bath has huge windows and a glass roof.

Ichino-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening times of Ichino-Yu: 07:00 – 23:00

Closed days of Ichino-Yu: Wednesdays

Huge and made of natural boulders, attending this soto-yu is thought to bring success and good fortune.

Outdoor Onsen Japan

Jizou-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening Times of Jizou-Yu: 07:00 – 23:00

Closed days of Jizou-Yu: Fridays

Jizou-yu, sometimes Jizo-yu is popular with families as it is one of the smaller bathhouses, but has no outdoor bath.   It has a large indoor bath and is rather plain.

Kouno-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening times of Kounu-Yu: 07:00 – 23:00

Closed days of Kouno-Yu: Tuesdays

Kouno-yu is Kinosaki Onsens’ first public onsen, it’s the furthest onsen from the JR Station and takes about 20 minutes to walk here.   Spending time at Kouno-yu is believed to bring you happiness and longevity in your marriage.    The onsen backs onto woodland and has an outdoor stone-lined onsen as well as a large indoor hot bath with floor-to-ceiling windows.

Mandara-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening Times of Mandara-Yu: 15:00 – 23:00

Closed days of Mandara-Yu: Wednesdays

A visit here is said to bring business prosperity, you’ll find the Mandara-Yu just off the main street.  There is a large indoor onsen as well as 2 small outdoor baths.

outdoor onsen

Satono-yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening times of Satono-yu; 13:00 – 21:00

Closed days of Satono-yu: Mondays

This huge onsen has a variety of different baths and bathing experiences from cold to Arab and salt.   As there are smaller baths contained within the experience, it’s not one huge one, so you might be lucky enough to get a bath to yourself.  There are different baths on different floors and each day switches between which baths are open to men and women.    It’s right next to the train station and has a free footbath outside.

Yanagi-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki

Opening Times of Yanagi-Yu: 15:00 – 23:00

Closed Days of Yanagi-yu: Thursdays

One of the most traditional, but also the smallest onsen in Kinosaki.  It’s made from cypress wood and a visit here is said to promote fertility and safe childbirth.

Map of Onsens in Kinosaki Onsen Town

You can also find the Kinosaki onsens map for Kinosaki here .

Map of Onsens of Kinosaki

Kinosaki Onsen FAQS

Got questions about visiting the Kinosaki onsens? Or want to know more about how to visit the onsens in Kinosaki and we haven’t answered your questions?  Check out our frequently asked questions about visiting onsens below, or ask us yours in the comments.

Are tattoos allowed in the onsens in Kinosaki?

Yes.  It is possible to visit the 7 public onsens of Kinosaki if you have tattoos.  Some onsens within ryokans may have different rules, so please check before booking a room

Is there a luggage storage service in Kinosaki Onsen?

Yes.  The hotel information center near the railway station has left luggage in Kinosaki Onsen town.  You can also find coin lockers at the station and you may also be able to leave your bags at your ryokan or hotel.

Where do I get a pass for the onsens in Kinosaki?

If you are staying at a ryokan you will be given a free onsen pass when you check in.  This gives you free access to all the 7 public onsens.  It is valid from 15:00 on the day you check in until 15:30 the day you check out.  If you wish to visit Kinosaki for a day, you can buy a day pass that covers all the onsens in Kinosaki at the door to each of the onsens.

How much are the onsen day passes in Kinosaki?

A day pass to the Kinosaki onsens costs 1300 Yen.

Can I use an onsen privately?

The public baths are just that, pubic, but some of the ryokans in Kinosaki offer private onsen booking experiences. You can find ryokans with private onsens in Kinosaki here.

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Final Words on the Onsens of Kinosaki Onsen Town

There might be other hot spring towns in Japan, but not many of them have as many onsens as Kinosaki, nor do they have onsens that differ so much in terms of style.  Whether you’re selective and pick just a few (like we did) or go for the full pilgrimage around all of them, you are about to be the cleanest you’ve ever been and probably the most relaxed too. 

Stock images in this article are courtesy Deposit Photos.

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I’ve never been to Japan, but this article really makes me want to hop on a plane and sit in an onsen, thanks for all the tips!

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Kinosaki Onsen: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Japan's 1300-Year-Old Hot Spring Town

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Kinosaki Onsen is a hot spring town in Hyogo Prefecture that can be reached from Osaka or Kyoto in about 2 hours and 30 minutes by train. This makes it a great day trip option for anyone visiting Osaka or Kyoto, especially if they're tired of exploring all the main cities of Japan. This article covers everything you need to know about Kinosaki Onsen, from the best places to stay and food you should eat to what kind of activities you can do there. Keep reading to learn more!

Check out our writers’ top Japan travel ideas!

This post may contain affiliate links. If you buy through them, we may earn a commission at no additional cost to you.

What is Kinosaki Onsen?

Kinosaki Onsen is an area in Hyogo Prefecture with 7 public bath houses placed along a river lined with willow trees. These bathing facilities are filled with 42°C (107.6°F) hot spring water that is known for helping with nerve, muscular, and stomach pain. Surrounding them are several traditional inns ("ryokan" in Japanese) where people can stay overnight and enjoy traditional Japanese meals.  

Don't Miss out on the Sotoyu Meguri

Generally, visitors take a stroll along the river to visit all 7 of the public bath houses in Kinosaki Onsen, as it is believed this will grant them good luck. This practice is called "Sotoyu Meguri", literally "strolling around the outer baths". A single pass is all you need to get access to all the bath houses, and if you stay overnight at one of the beautiful inns in the area, you can get this pass for free!

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Hot Spring Drinking Fountains and Foot Baths

Who said hot spring waters are only good for bathing? You can find drinking fountains in front of the train station and Ichino-yu (one of the 7 bath houses) that are filled with drinkable hot spring water! Go ahead and take a sip, especially if you suffer from chronic digestive issues!  

As you wander throughout the town, you should eventually stumble upon this landmark. Named "Shirosaki Onsen", this is actually the oldest hot spring source of the whole area. The temperature of its waters reach a stunning 80°C (176°F)!  

Both inside the bath houses and outside, you will find hot spring baths for your feet, called "ashiyu" in Japanese. They're great for warming your feet up on a cold day!

Check out our writers’ top Japan travel ideas!

Stroll Around Town in a Yukata

Unless you don't mind feeling like a fish out of water, you're going to need a yukata for your Sotoyu Meguri. A yukata is the light version of a kimono, and it comes in equally beautiful colors and designs. Most facilities in Kinosaki Onsen allow you to either rent or buy your yukata set, which includes the robe, the obi (belt), a pair of wooden sandals called "geta", and sometimes even matching accessories. Don't worry if you don't know how to wear it - a staff member will usually help you put it on!

Enjoy Some Street Food While You're Here

Kinosaki sweets main branch.

There's nothing quite like wandering around town all dressed up while snacking on various foods. One of the best places for snacks is Kinosaki Sweets Main Branch. As you might guess from its name, it makes desserts like ice cream, parfaits, and baked sweets with local ingredients.

Their Kinosaki Gelato is an incredibly popular treat among Sotoyu Meguri participants. Made with all-natural ingredients, this dessert comes in a variety of flavors - matcha, raspberry, mango, and so on - and will perk you right up.

Seasonal Events in Kinosaki Onsen

Danjiri festival.

While you can visit Kinosaki Onsen any time of the year, it is recommended to plan your trip around one of its seasonal events. The picture above shows a glimpse of the Danjiri Festival, which is the biggest event in town. Held on October 14th and 15th every year, it is meant to bring in good luck.

A "danjiri" is a decorated wooden cart, like the one you can see above. During this festival, several danjiri are paraded around town. It's a stunning sight that will remain in your memory even after you leave Japan!  

Another one-of-a-kind experience can be had with the Kani Okoku, a festival dedicated to crabs ("kani" in Japanese) that coincides with the crab season in Japan, which is from November to March. Kinosaki Onsen is home to ridiculously good snow crab thanks to its proximity to the Sea of Japan, and during the crab season, visitors get to sample this crab in restaurants and ryokan all across town! There's even an award ceremony for the best crab caught in that time period!

Recommended Ryokan

If you want to fully experience all of Kinosaki Onsen, it is recommended to spend at least one night there. Not sure which ryokan or hotel is the best to stay at? Check out the article below for some ideas!

Must-Buy Souvenirs

Rice flour cheesecake at kinosaki sweets main branch.

Mentioned before for its delicious gelato, Kinosaki Sweets happens to also be the best place to buy souvenirs for your family and friends! The little treats in the photo above are artisanal baked cheesecakes made with rice flour. They come in several flavor variations, such as chooclate, matcha, and vanilla, and are the perfect size to satisfy your sweet tooth without overeating!

What makes these little cheesecakes even more special is that the rice used for the flour are grown in fields inhabited by storks. These birds are considered to be symbols of happiness, and it is this happiness that the patissiers of this shop aim to transmit to their customers. A wonderful sentiment, no?

Now that you know what to do, what to wear, places to eat, and even where to stay, consider visiting Kinosaki Onsen the next time you have some days off or just feel like having a relaxing weekend! You may enjoy the experience so much that you'll repeat it multiple times.

If you want to give feedback on any of our articles, you have an idea that you'd really like to see come to life, or you just have a question on Japan, hit us up on our  Facebook  or  Twitter !

Thumbnail: Rei Imagine / Shutterstock.com

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The information in this article is accurate at the time of publication.

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Visit Kinosaki Onsen – Local Experience In Kansai

Kinosaki onsen

One of the favorite pastimes of many people in Japan is visiting onsen, the hot springs that are found all over the country. It is one of those local experiences that you can’t miss out on when you travel to Japan, and it will be difficult to choose where to go as there are so many options. One of the best places to enjoy a traditional hot spring experience is Kinosaki Onsen (城崎温泉) in Hyogo , an onsen town around 2.5 hours north from Kyoto by train. Let us show you why a stay at Kinosaki Onsen should feature on your Japan itinerary!

Short history of public bath houses

Kinosaki onsen old town center, kinosaki ropeway, onsenji temple, konotori no sato park (oriental stork), cycling the maruyama river, kinosaki crab, stay at a ryokan, a true local experience in kansai, other article you might enjoy.

Being one of the most tectonically active areas in the world , Japan has its fair share of natural hot springs. They are known for providing several health benefits to bathers such as the alleviation of aches and pains, easing digestive issues, and nurturing the skin. This knowledge is not new, in fact, the oldest books that were written in Japan dating back as far as the 1st century already mention people bathing in hot springs.

The Japanese have been enjoying onsen since ancient times. Back in the days, former Emperors and important lords were among the first to enjoy the benefits of Japan’s onsen, and from the Edo Period onwards regular citizens were also allowed to relax in communal baths. In fact, in those sento bath houses men and women were allowed to bathe together, greatly surprising the Westerners who started coming to Japan from the late 19th century. Nowadays, it is almost always a gender-separated affair and visiting small sento as well as onsen resorts has become a popular thing to do on weekends and national holidays. When visiting an onsen always make sure to follow the onsen etiquette, they’re many written and unwritten rules when taking an onsen and you are expected to follow there. After all, onsen are an integral part of the Japanese culture.

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Being one of the oldest hot spring towns in Japan, the village of Kinosaki Onsen is completely devoted to bathing. There are 7 public bath houses in Kinosaki Onsen, each of which has its own features and health benefits. They are set indoors as well as outdoors, and we recommend you to try both. In wintertime, outdoor bathing is especially invigorating. Most of the bath houses have beautiful traditional exteriors and are situated alongside a tree-lined canal. Once night falls, the village will be pleasantly lit up. Just taking a stroll around the scenic old town center will be one of the highlights of your stay.

Kinosaki onsen

The townscape seems to come straight out of a Japanese anime , and you will feel like you’re transported back in time. Many visitors wear a yukata while they are strolling around the little town, adding to the charming atmosphere. You will be provided with a yukata by the ryokan you are staying at , so feel free to join in! Besides the atmosphere of the town itself and bathing in different hot springs, there are other things to do in Kinosaki Onsen. Let’s have a look at some other must-do activities in the region!

Mount Dashi (大師山), with an height of (only) 231m, is overlooking the small town of Kinosaki Onsen and the surrounding area. From the top, you can enjoy a beautiful panoramic view of the mountainous area. The spectacular view was awarded 1 Star by the Michelin Green Guide Japan. To get to the top, you have two options. If you are feeling like a little walk you can take the hiking trail which takes you from Kinosaki Station to the top. The hike to the top takes approximately 45 minutes one way. Alternatively you can take the ropeway up, or combine to two options.

Kinosaki onsen

Kinosaki Ropeway Daily operating 9.10am to 4.50pm Round trip to summit ¥910 Round trip to middle station ¥570

Along the mountain slope of Mt. Daishi, this Buddhist temple reveres the guardian spirit of the hot springs. Legend has it that the saint who this temple is dedicated to has patiently prayed for 1.000 days after which the spring water came to Kinosaki. Some visitors of the hot spring town first visit Onsenji Temple (温泉寺), which literally translates as ‘onsen temple’, in order to receive the healing powers that will make their visit to the hot springs as powerful as possible. Most of the temple’s main buildings are located halfway up the forested mountain, but some additional temple structures are located at the foot of the mountain.

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If you like art, you may want to visit the Kinosaki Art Museum (城崎美術館) nearby that displays the temple’s treasures. In order to get to the temple, you can either get some physical exercise and climb the stairs, or you can take the Kinosaki Ropeway. It stops at the main hall of the temple, and goes even further up to the observation deck from where you can overlook the town and it’s beautiful green surroundings.

Onsenji Temple 9am to 5pm (may be closed when the ropeway doesn’t operate) Admission fee temple: ¥300 (¥400 including the museum)

Only 10 kilometers from Kinosaki Onsen you can find the Konotori no Sato Park (コウノトリの郷公園), where they breed the stately Oriental Stork. This local bird went extinct in the 1970s because of farming eliminating its food sources, but the government decided to bring them back. They imported some birds from Russia, and the breeding program that centers around this park was successful as birds that were born in the park are now breeding in the wild as well.

There is a museum where you can learn more about the breeding program and the birds themselves, and you can see the Oriental Storks in their breeding habitat. If you are lucky, you can see multiple storks going about their business from close up!

Stork

Konotori no Sato Park 9am – 5pm (closed on Mondays) Free admission

Kinosaki Onsen is surrounded by quiet, natural areas. For those who want to spend some more time in nature, cycling along the Maruyama river is a great way to enjoy the environment without breaking a sweat. You can get a rental bicycle from the SOZORO Kinosaki Tourist Information Center, and cycle either north or south. If you go north, you will reach Kehi Beach and the Tsuiyama Fishing Port. Just of the Hiyoriyama Kaigan Coast in the north, you can see the small island Nochigashima Island with an ancient palace-like structure built on the top. The island is also known as Dragon Palace Island and the view is particularly nice when the light of the sunset creates a fairytale-like atmosphere. During the spring and summer months, you can enjoy swimming in the ocean at Kehi Beach, as well as BBQing.

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When you cycling south along the river from Kinosaki, you will pass by the Hachigoro Wetlands and the 5 Genbudo Caves. These basalt caves were formed after volcanic eruptions more than a million years ago after the magma cooled down. Interesting formations were exposed after the area’s earlier inhabitants carved out the caves, and they were designated as a national natural treasure in the 1930s.

Every region in Japan has its own local gourmet specialties, and Kinosaki Onsen’s pride is the Matsuba-gani, or snow crab. Only available during the winter season (November-March), this crab is supposed to be one of the most delicious crabs out there. Its meat is rich and slightly sweet, and the female version has eggs that give it a strong umami flavor.

They are caught right off the coast of Kinosaki, so the crab here is super fresh. Most restaurants and ryokan serve Kinosaki crab when it is in season, so make sure to look for it if you come to Kinosaki Onsen during the winter months!

If you want to be able to truly relax in Kinosaki Onsen, we recommend you to stay overnight. Of course, a stay at a ryokan (a traditional Japanese accommodation) is essential if you want to have the full local experience. Typical features of a ryokan stay are staying in a tatami room, sleeping on a futon, and enjoying exquisite Japanese cuisine for dinner and breakfast. You will also experience true Japanese hospitality from your hosts known omotenashi , meaning to wholeheartedly look after guests.

A ryokan stay also comes with a private or semi-private onsen bath, so you can enjoy another soak just before you roll onto your futon. You will surely have one of the most restful nights of sleep of your holiday in the ryokan! Some of our recommended ryokan in Kinosaki:

  • Nishimuraya Honkan
  • Oyado Hayakawa

You can plan your visit to Kinosaki Onsen between a stay in Kanazawa and Kyoto, two of the popular cities to visit in Japan. If you want to make the most of your stay in those historic cities, why not plan a private tour with one of our amazing guides? We have local experts in both Kyoto and Kanazawa . A guided tour will provide you with insights that you otherwise wouldn’t easily gain, and you can be sure that you will see all the best a city has to offer.

Other fun activities to do in and around Kinosaki Onsen:

▶ Learn the ancient Onsenji bathing method at Kinosaki Onsen ▶ Sea kayaking in the Sea of Japan ▶ Temple visit and matcha tea experience

Kinosaki Onsen

As you can see, visiting Kinosaki Onsen will provide you with a true local experience in the Kansai region, and there are many things to see and do in the area. This lovely little onsen town is among the best onsen towns in the Kansai area and a pleasant getaway from the well known areas. like nearby Kyoto. As it is a little bit off the beaten track, you will be one of the few foreign tourists here. It will be one of the highlights of your stay in Japan for sure!

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Happy travelling!

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Stefanie Akkerman moved from the Netherlands to Japan in 2013 with her Japanese husband and son. She jumped into the niche of Dutch tour guiding in Tokyo and Kamakura in 2015 and occasionally writes articles about all the great sights and activities Japan has to offer. She loves (Japanese) food, and to work that all off she goes diving, snorkeling, cycling, or hiking.

This post may contain some affiliate links. When you click through and make a purchase we may receive some commission, at no extra costs to you.

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The Best Places to Visit in Japan

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The best places to visit in Japan shouldn’t be limited to Tokyo , Kyoto, and Osaka. While the popular triangle is certainly convenient—and memorable—for visitors, there’s so much more to the Land of the Rising Sun than these three major cities. In fact, Japan’s true beauty lies in the rural destinations that make up the majority of the country, along with secondary and tertiary metropolises that offer a less, shall we say, traveled opportunity to view the culture.

Once you’ve ventured away from the popular trio, you’ll find yourself craving for more. Alluring landscapes that transform with the seasons, small towns embalmed in the past, the healing powers of natural wonders, and highly regional cuisine are just the tip of the iceberg. Where to start? Well, really, anywhere. Randomly point to a town on a map and you’ll probably fall in love. But if that’s too intimidating, here are 10 of the best places to visit in Japan that you probably haven’t heard of yet.

The Nakasendo Trail

Image may contain City Road Street Urban Alley Outdoors Nature Plant Countryside Architecture and Building

Thanks to the recent FX hit Shōgun , interest in feudal Japan has reached an all-time high. Walk back in time on the Nakasendo Trail, a 17th-century route that samurai once used to travel between Kyoto and present-day Tokyo. Along the route, several well-preserved post towns offer a glimpse back into the Edo Period, and majestic mountain landscapes serve as the backdrop to traditional timber buildings and cobblestone roads. Two of the most popular and picturesque post towns are Magome and Tsumago, but it’s also worth venturing to some of the others like Narai and Kiso-Fukushima. Hiking at least a section of the route is the best way to get a sense of this piece of history. You can visit centuries-old rest stops for tea—or even umeshu (plum wine)—along the way. If you want to take a more leisurely approach, a local train also stops at some of these idyllic villages.

Where to stay:

Opened in 2021, Byaku Narai is the only luxury boutique hotel that’s set directly along the Nakasendo Trail. Spread across four meticulously restored machiya (traditional wood homes) in its namesake town, you’ll find 16 individually designed rooms with sumptuous touches like self-filling tubs or open-air baths, locally made lacquerware, and spacious courtyards with manicured gardens. The on-site Kura restaurant is also not to be missed, with a menu overseen by chef Zaiyu Hasegawa of accolade-decorated Den in Tokyo and dishes that highlight the abundance of the Kiso Valley. If you’re traveling with a larger group and looking for an exclusive-use villa that includes experiences and a private chef, Zenagi , located in a rural area of Nagiso, can accommodate up to 12 guests.

Image may contain City Architecture Building Cityscape Urban Downtown Outdoors Neighborhood and Road

Hokkaido , Japan’s northernmost island, is well regarded for its exemplary produce, dairy, seafood, and beef. In other words, expect phenomenal food. Sapporo, the isle’s capital, is arguably one of the most underrated major cities in the country. Yes, this is where the popular Japanese premium lager was founded, but there’s more to Sapporo than its beer. Pay a visit to Sapporo Art Park , one of the country’s most extraordinary outdoor institutions for contemporary sculptures, or the Sapporo Snow Festival, an annual weeklong event featuring dozens of snow and ice sculptures, including several large-scale installations. And, it’s worth mentioning again that you’ll have some of your most memorable bites here, from creamy soft serves to succulent king crab. Be prepared for lots of powder in the winter (it’s the second snowiest city in the world), but for those who are smart enough to come during the summer, Hokkaido is a nice break from the rest of Japan’s humid climate; there are several picturesque flower fields near Sapporo that make for gorgeous day trips.

Truth be told, up until recently, Sapporo was sort of a dead zone for hotel lovers. But that started to change in 2020 when Onsen Ryokan Yuen Sapporo opened. A modern take on traditional Japanese inns, the property offers well-appointed rooms, minimalist interiors, and hot spring facilities. This year also saw the arrival of Sapporo Stream Hotel —primely situated in the heart of the city’s entertainment district, Suskino—and Hotel Sosei Sapporo , an M Gallery property that’s part of French hospitality group Accor.

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Sea Water Beach Coast Shoreline Scenery Sky and Landscape

Sandwiched between Honshu and Shikoku in the Seto Inland Sea are a string of islets known as Japan’s art islands. The most popular—largely thanks to Yayoi Kusama’s yellow Pumpkin —is Naoshima. In addition to the artist’s iconic gourd-shaped sculpture by the water, this is where you’ll also find two of the country’s most prized contemporary art institutions, Benesse House Museum and Chichu Art Museum . There are also several other venues worth visiting, including one dedicated to renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando, who designed both Benesse House and Chichu, as well as Art House Project, a collection of abandoned homes that have been restored and transformed into installations by various Japanese artists.

While Benesse House doubles as a hotel, one of the hottest hotels in the country right now is Naoshima Ryokan Roka . The relatively new, all-suite ryokan is the first of its kind on the island. Enjoy chic, minimalist digs with open-air baths and the property’s own collection of contemporary art by emerging talents spread throughout the grounds.

Image may contain City Plant Tree Urban Nature Outdoors Scenery Architecture Building Hotel Resort and Road

About two and a half hours from Kyoto, Kinosaki is an onsen town famed for its seven tattoo-friendly hot springs (typically, those bearing ink are forbidden from entering these shared facilities due to the association with yakuza). When you arrive, it feels like you’ve been transported back in time: built along a willow-lined river, stone bridges connect the split roads and buildings retain their centuries-old architecture. Visitors are highly encouraged to walk about in a yukata (a casual version of a kimono) and geta (wooden flip-flops) shoes—whether they’re shopping at the various souvenir stores or onsen -hopping. It’s the perfect place to unwind after you’ve had a busy few days exploring some of Japan’s other popular destinations.

Founded in 1860, Nishimuraya Honkan is widely recognized as one of the country’s best traditional ryokans . It boasts 32 archetypal rooms with tatami mat flooring, shoji screens, and futon bedding; in-room kaiseki (a traditional multi-course meal) experiences; and a beautifully manicured garden with a small koi pond. The property offers its own public baths, but if you’re shy and prefer a private option, its sister hotel just down the street has you covered.

Image may contain Transportation Tricycle Vehicle Computer Hardware Electronics Hardware Monitor and Screen

Craving small town energy? Tucked away in the mountains of Gifu Prefecture, Takayama is home to one of Japan’s most meticulously preserved old towns. Known as Sanmachi, the narrow streets are lined with historic wooden buildings dating back to the Edo Period. Once the dwellings of merchants and craftsmen, many have turned into souvenir shops and stalls selling the region’s delicacy, Hida beef (a type of Wagyu), with a few centuries-old sake breweries peppered throughout. While you’re here, head over to Hida no Sato, an open-air museum showcasing dozens of traditional homes that were built in the Edo Period, or make it a launching point for a day trip to Shirakawa-go, a quaint village with wood-beamed gassho-zukuri farmhouses that has been dubbed a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Trade traditional accommodations for an overnight stay in a Buddhist temple at Temple Hotel Zenkoji . The five rooms are simple, but offer a surprising mix of old and new: tatami mat flooring and futons meet modern bathrooms complete with a Toto bidet. Slide open the shoji screens to reveal a beautiful garden and rise early for morning meditation with the resident monk.

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Scenery and Autumn

If a national park , UNESCO World Heritage Site, mountain landscapes, and serene lake are on your travel list, you can tick them all off with one visit to Nikko. This town is most famous for the ornate and gilded 17th-century Toshogu Shrine built in honor of the founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate. But beyond this piece of UNESCO-status history, Nikko offers a scenic escape for those looking for respite from the neon lights of Tokyo. Head further into the national park and you’ll find hot springs, waterfalls, and Lake Chuzenji, Japan’s highest natural lake. Hike along its 15.5-mile circumference or—for something a little more challenging—summit Mount Nantai, a trek that some deem more rewarding than climbing Mount Fuji.

Nikko is an easy day trip from Tokyo , but the Ritz-Carlton, Nikko makes a strong case for staying a night or two. A majority of the sumptuous rooms look out to Lake Chuzenji, and there’s even a lake house-style restaurant. The hotel offers fantastic programming that runs the gamut from outdoor adventures to cultural activities, including zazen sessions with a monk at the nearby temple and hands-on experience with Nikko-bori wood carving. Unwind at the onsen in your free time and enjoy a nightcap at the bar where you’ll find an extensive range of whiskies from all over the country.

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Scenery Water Waterfront Boat Transportation Vehicle Flower Plant and Watercraft

One could argue that every city in Japan is a food destination , but Fukuoka is truly the epitome of a culinary wonderland. For starters, the capital of Kyushu Island is the birthplace of tonkotsu ramen—the unctuous and creamy pork bone-based broth that’s often associated with the noodle dish—and is where ramen stalwarts Ichiran and Ippudo first started. It’s also a go-to spot for high-quality mentaiko (spicy pollock roe), a local delicacy. To top it all off, it’s the only place in Japan that truly has a street food culture thanks to its unique yatai food stalls. These temporary stands pop up in the evenings across the city and serve a variety of comfort foods until well after midnight when they’re broken down and tucked away ahead of sunrise. Unlike typical grab-and-go street food stalls, these have built-in, counter-esque seating so that you can plop down and enjoy your meal with a drink in hand.

When the Ritz-Carlton, Fukuoka opened last year, it marked the arrival of the city’s first true luxury hotel. Set in the vibrant district of Tenjin, a bevy of shops and restaurants are just steps away from comfortable, modern digs.

Image may contain Mountain Nature Outdoors and Water

Known as one of the country’s most sought-after hot springs destinations, the seaside town of Beppu just southeast of Fukuoka is where you go to relax and soak in mineral-rich waters. What sets Beppu apart from every other onsen town? In addition to having the highest number of onsen sources in Japan, it’s famed for its eight “hells”—distinct-looking hot springs that are too hot to bathe. (Chinoike Jigoku, for example, has a red hue due to the iron oxide–dense mud.) Tour the circuit to see the unmatched geological diversity for yourself and enjoy the unique practice of cooking food over the steam produced by these thermal sites.

Hugging a bluff overlooking the city, ANA InterContinental Beppu Resort & Spa affords picture-perfect panoramic vistas from just about every angle of the property. Dip into your en-suite onsen on the balcony and watch as plumes of steam billow up from the ground. If you prefer to be closer to town and the bay, Kai Beppu is in the thick of the action.

Image may contain Architecture Building Cityscape Urban Outdoors Nature Sea Water Aerial View Coast and Shoreline

About an hour train ride from Tokyo Station, Atami is an easy day trip or add-on to any Tokyo itinerary. The coastal city on the Izu Peninsula has long been a popular resort destination for those seeking a break from the frenetic city thanks to its abundance of hot springs and a tropical sandy beach. It’s also home to some of the earliest blooming plum trees in Japan, affording visitors the chance to admire delicate pink flowers as soon as January ahead of spring’s busy cherry blossom season . And while most places in Japan limit fireworks to summer, Atami puts on sky-illuminating displays all year round; they’re best viewed from the namesake castle overlooking the city.

While there are plenty of great hotels in Atami, take this overnight opportunity to visit an off-the-beaten-path locale. Just under an hour away, the quaint port city of Numazu is most known for the anime Love Live! Sunshine!! as well as its production of dried Japanese horse mackerel which is sold in a small but lively morning market. It’s also in Numazu that you’ll find Numazu Club , a 1913 teahouse-turned-WWII refuge-turned-restaurant-turned-members club-turned-hotel. It has quite the past and is now a hidden gem ensconced in a verdant garden with a mix of just eight Japanese- and Western-style rooms that feature traditional elements in a modern space. After a busy day, enjoy a meal of upscale Chinese fare in the historic teahouse followed by a relaxing soak in the spa’s open-air bath.

Noboribetsu

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Scenery Water Waterfront Landscape Mountain Path Boardwalk and Bridge

In case you haven’t noticed by now, hot springs are Japan’s pinnacle of relaxation and wellness. If you, too, have become a fan of these mineral-rich waters, a visit to Noboribetsu is in order. Hokkaido’s most popular onsen town is located between Sapporo and Hakodate, making it an ideal layover between the two cities. The main attraction here is Jigokudani. Literally translating to “hell valley,” the moniker alludes to the hot steam vents that rise from volcanic land. Hiking trails wind through the valley, with the most popular leading up to Oyunuma, a sulfurous pond surrounded by a lush forest with a river that doubles as a foot bath for trekkers. The best time to visit is in autumn, when the fall foliage beautifully contrasts the blue water. (In the winter, many paths may be closed due to snow and treacherously icy conditions.)

Another opportunity for a two-in-one deal, Shiraoi is just five train stops away from Noboribetsu. In this small town, you’ll find Upopoy National Ainu Museum and Park , an institution dedicated to educating visitors on Hokkaido’s indigenous people. Just around the corner is Kai Poroto , a recently opened onsen hotel on the banks of its namesake lake. The retreat pays homage to Ainu culture with its cone-shaped bathhouses inspired by its traditional architecture, activities that celebrate the Ainu’s connection with nature, and kaiseki meals inspired by local flavors and techniques.

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The best places to visit in Japan

best places to visit in japan

The best places to visit in Japan shouldn’t be limited to Tokyo , Kyoto and Osaka. While the popular triangle is certainly convenient—and memorable—for visitors, there’s so much more to the Land of the Rising Sun than these three major cities. In fact, Japan’s true beauty lies in the rural destinations that make up the majority of the country, along with secondary and tertiary metropolises that offer a less, shall we say, travelled opportunity to view the culture.

Once you’ve ventured away from the popular trio, you’ll find yourself craving for more. Alluring landscapes that transform with the seasons, small towns embalmed in the past, the healing powers of natural wonders and highly regional cuisine are just the tip of the iceberg. Where to start? Well, really, anywhere. Randomly point to a town on a map and you’ll probably fall in love. But if that’s too intimidating, here are 10 of the best places to visit in Japan that you probably haven’t heard of yet.

The Nakasendo Trail

Image may contain City Road Street Urban Alley Outdoors Nature Plant Countryside Architecture and Building

Thanks to the recent FX hit Shōgun , interest in feudal Japan has reached an all-time high. Walk back in time on the Nakasendo Trail, a 17th-century route that samurai once used to travel between Kyoto and present-day Tokyo. Along the route, several well-preserved post towns offer a glimpse back into the Edo Period, and majestic mountain landscapes serve as the backdrop to traditional timber buildings and cobblestone roads. Two of the most popular and picturesque post towns are Magome and Tsumago, but it’s also worth venturing to some of the others like Narai and Kiso-Fukushima. Hiking at least a section of the route is the best way to get a sense of this piece of history. You can visit centuries-old rest stops for tea—or even umeshu ( plum wine )—along the way. If you want to take a more leisurely approach, a local train also stops at some of these idyllic villages.

Where to stay:

Isha Ambani Piramal: “I’m very quick to say that my twins were conceived via IVF because that’s how we’ll normalise it”

Opened in 2021, Byaku Narai is the only luxury boutique hotel that’s set directly along the Nakasendo Trail. Spread across four meticulously restored machiya (traditional wood homes) in its namesake town, you’ll find 16 individually designed rooms with sumptuous touches like self-filling tubs or open-air baths, locally made lacquerware and spacious courtyards with manicured gardens. The on-site Kura restaurant is also not to be missed, with a menu overseen by chef Zaiyu Hasegawa of accolade-decorated Den in Tokyo and dishes that highlight the abundance of the Kiso Valley. If you’re traveling with a larger group and looking for an exclusive-use villa that includes experiences and a private chef, Zenagi , located in a rural area of Nagiso, can accommodate up to 12 guests.

Image may contain City Architecture Building Cityscape Urban Downtown Outdoors Neighborhood and Road

Hokkaido, Japan’s northernmost island, is well regarded for its exemplary produce, dairy, seafood, and beef. In other words, expect phenomenal food. Sapporo, the isle’s capital, is arguably one of the most underrated major cities in the country. Yes, this is where the popular Japanese premium lager was founded, but there’s more to Sapporo than its beer. Pay a visit to Sapporo Art Park, one of the country’s most extraordinary outdoor institutions for contemporary sculptures, or the Sapporo Snow Festival, an annual weeklong event featuring dozens of snow and ice sculptures, including several large-scale installations. And, it’s worth mentioning again that you’ll have some of your most memorable bites here, from creamy soft serves to succulent king crab. Be prepared for lots of powder in the winter (it’s the second snowiest city in the world), but for those who are smart enough to come during the summer, Hokkaido is a nice break from the rest of Japan’s humid climate; there are several picturesque flower fields near Sapporo that make for gorgeous day trips.

Truth be told, up until recently, Sapporo was sort of a dead zone for hotel lovers. But that started to change in 2020 when Onsen Ryokan Yuen Sapporo opened. A modern take on traditional Japanese inns, the property offers well-appointed rooms, minimalist interiors, and hot spring facilities. This year also saw the arrival of Sapporo Stream Hotel—primely situated in the heart of the city’s entertainment district, Suskino—and Hotel Sosei Sapporo, an M Gallery property that’s part of French hospitality group Accor.

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Sea Water Beach Coast Shoreline Scenery Sky and Landscape

Sandwiched between Honshu and Shikoku in the Seto Inland Sea are a string of islets known as Japan’s art islands. The most popular—largely thanks to Yayoi Kusama’s yellow Pumpkin —is Naoshima. In addition to the artist’s iconic gourd-shaped sculpture by the water, this is where you’ll also find two of the country’s most prized contemporary art institutions, Benesse House Museum and Chichu Art Museum. There are also several other venues worth visiting, including one dedicated to renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando, who designed both Benesse House and Chichu, as well as Art House Project, a collection of abandoned homes that have been restored and transformed into installations by various Japanese artists.

While Benesse House doubles as a hotel, one of the hottest hotels in the country right now is Naoshima Ryokan Roka. The relatively new, all-suite ryokan is the first of its kind on the island. Enjoy chic, minimalist digs with open-air baths and the property’s own collection of contemporary art by emerging talents spread throughout the grounds.

Image may contain City Plant Tree Urban Nature Outdoors Scenery Architecture Building Hotel Resort and Road

About two and a half hours from Kyoto, Kinosaki is an onsen town famed for its seven tattoo-friendly hot springs (typically, those bearing ink are forbidden from entering these shared facilities due to the association with yakuza). When you arrive, it feels like you’ve been transported back in time: built along a willow-lined river, stone bridges connect the split roads and buildings retain their centuries-old architecture. Visitors are highly encouraged to walk about in a yukata (a casual version of a kimono) and geta (wooden flip-flops) shoes—whether they’re shopping at the various souvenir stores or onsen -hopping. It’s the perfect place to unwind after you’ve had a busy few days exploring some of Japan’s other popular destinations.

Founded in 1860, Nishimuraya Honkan is widely recognized as one of the country’s best traditional ryokans . It boasts 32 archetypal rooms with tatami mat flooring, shoji screens, and futon bedding; in-room kaiseki (a traditional multi-course meal) experiences; and a beautifully manicured garden with a small koi pond. The property offers its own public baths, but if you’re shy and prefer a private option, its sister hotel just down the street has you covered.

Image may contain Transportation Tricycle Vehicle Computer Hardware Electronics Hardware Monitor and Screen

Craving small town energy? Tucked away in the mountains of Gifu Prefecture, Takayama is home to one of Japan’s most meticulously preserved old towns. Known as Sanmachi, the narrow streets are lined with historic wooden buildings dating back to the Edo Period. Once the dwellings of merchants and craftsmen, many have turned into souvenir shops and stalls selling the region’s delicacy, Hida beef (a type of Wagyu), with a few centuries-old sake breweries peppered throughout. While you’re here, head over to Hida no Sato, an open-air museum showcasing dozens of traditional homes that were built in the Edo Period, or make it a launching point for a day trip to Shirakawa-go, a quaint village with wood-beamed gassho-zukuri farmhouses that has been dubbed a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Trade traditional accommodations for an overnight stay in a Buddhist temple at Temple Hotel Zenkoji. The five rooms are simple, but offer a surprising mix of old and new: tatami mat flooring and futons meet modern bathrooms complete with a Toto bidet . Slide open the shoji screens to reveal a beautiful garden and rise early for morning meditation with the resident monk.

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Scenery and Autumn

If a national park, UNESCO World Heritage Site, mountain landscapes, and serene lake are on your travel list, you can tick them all off with one visit to Nikko. This town is most famous for the ornate and gilded 17th-century Toshogu Shrine built in honor of the founder of the Tokugawa Shogunate. But beyond this piece of UNESCO-status history, Nikko offers a scenic escape for those looking for respite from the neon lights of Tokyo. Head further into the national park and you’ll find hot springs, waterfalls, and Lake Chuzenji, Japan’s highest natural lake. Hike along its 15.5-mile circumference or—for something a little more challenging—summit Mount Nantai, a trek that some deem more rewarding than climbing Mount Fuji.

Nikko is an easy day trip from Tokyo, but the Ritz-Carlton, Nikko makes a strong case for staying a night or two. A majority of the sumptuous rooms look out to Lake Chuzenji, and there’s even a lake house-style restaurant. The hotel offers fantastic programming that runs the gamut from outdoor adventures to cultural activities, including zazen sessions with a monk at the nearby temple and hands-on experience with Nikko-bori wood carving. Unwind at the onsen in your free time and enjoy a nightcap at the bar where you’ll find an extensive range of whiskies from all over the country.

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Scenery Water Waterfront Boat Transportation Vehicle Flower Plant and Watercraft

One could argue that every city in Japan is a food destination, but Fukuoka is truly the epitome of a culinary wonderland. For starters, the capital of Kyushu Island is the birthplace of tonkotsu ramen—the unctuous and creamy pork bone-based broth that’s often associated with the noodle dish—and is where ramen stalwarts Ichiran and Ippudo first started. It’s also a go-to spot for high-quality mentaiko (spicy pollock roe), a local delicacy . To top it all off, it’s the only place in Japan that truly has a street food culture thanks to its unique yatai food stalls. These temporary stands pop up in the evenings across the city and serve a variety of comfort foods until well after midnight when they’re broken down and tucked away ahead of sunrise. Unlike typical grab-and-go street food stalls, these have built-in, counter-esque seating so that you can plop down and enjoy your meal with a drink in hand.

When the Ritz-Carlton, Fukuoka opened last year, it marked the arrival of the city’s first true luxury hotel. Set in the vibrant district of Tenjin, a bevy of shops and restaurants are just steps away from comfortable, modern digs.

Image may contain Mountain Nature Outdoors and Water

Known as one of the country’s most sought-after hot springs destinations, the seaside town of Beppu just southeast of Fukuoka is where you go to relax and soak in mineral-rich waters. What sets Beppu apart from every other onsen town? In addition to having the highest number of onsen sources in Japan, it’s famed for its eight “hells”—distinct-looking hot springs that are too hot to bathe. (Chinoike Jigoku, for example, has a red hue due to the iron oxide–dense mud.) Tour the circuit to see the unmatched geological diversity for yourself and enjoy the unique practice of cooking food over the steam produced by these thermal sites .

Hugging a bluff overlooking the city, ANA InterContinental Beppu Resort & Spa affords picture-perfect panoramic vistas from just about every angle of the property. Dip into your en-suite onsen on the balcony and watch as plumes of steam billow up from the ground . If you prefer to be closer to town and the bay, Kai Beppu is in the thick of the action.

Image may contain Architecture Building Cityscape Urban Outdoors Nature Sea Water Aerial View Coast and Shoreline

About an hour train ride from Tokyo Station, Atami is an easy day trip or add-on to any Tokyo itinerary. The coastal city on the Izu Peninsula has long been a popular resort destination for those seeking a break from the frenetic city thanks to its abundance of hot springs and a tropical sandy beach. It’s also home to some of the earliest blooming plum trees in Japan, affording visitors the chance to admire delicate pink flowers as soon as January ahead of spring’s busy cherry blossom season. And while most places in Japan limit fireworks to summer, Atami puts on sky-illuminating displays all year round; they’re best viewed from the namesake castle overlooking the city.

While there are plenty of great hotels in Atami, take this overnight opportunity to visit an off-the-beaten-path locale. Just under an hour away, the quaint port city of Numazu is most known for the anime Love Live! Sunshine!! as well as its production of dried Japanese horse mackerel which is sold in a small but lively morning market. It’s also in Numazu that you’ll find Numazu Club, a 1913 teahouse-turned-WWII refuge-turned-restaurant-turned-members club-turned-hotel. It has quite the past and is now a hidden gem ensconced in a verdant garden with a mix of just eight Japanese- and Western-style rooms that feature traditional elements in a modern space. After a busy day, enjoy a meal of upscale Chinese fare in the historic teahouse followed by a relaxing soak in the spa’s open-air bath.

Noboribetsu

Image may contain Nature Outdoors Scenery Water Waterfront Landscape Mountain Path Boardwalk and Bridge

In case you haven’t noticed by now, hot springs are Japan’s pinnacle of relaxation and wellness. If you, too, have become a fan of these mineral-rich waters, a visit to Noboribetsu is in order. Hokkaido’s most popular onsen town is located between Sapporo and Hakodate, making it an ideal layover between the two cities. The main attraction here is Jigokudani. Literally translating to “hell valley,” the moniker alludes to the hot steam vents that rise from volcanic land. Hiking trails wind through the valley, with the most popular leading up to Oyunuma, a sulfurous pond surrounded by a lush forest with a river that doubles as a foot bath for trekkers. The best time to visit is in autumn, when the fall foliage beautifully contrasts the blue water. (In the winter, many paths may be closed due to snow and treacherously icy conditions.)

Another opportunity for a two-in-one deal, Shiraoi is just five train stops away from Noboribetsu. In this small town, you’ll find Upopoy National Ainu Museum and Park, an institution dedicated to educating visitors on Hokkaido’s indigenous people. Just around the corner is Kai Poroto, a recently opened onsen hotel on the banks of its namesake lake. The retreat pays homage to Ainu culture with its cone-shaped bathhouses inspired by its traditional architecture, activities that celebrate the Ainu’s connection with nature, and kaiseki meals inspired by local flavors and techniques.

This article first appeared on Vogue.com

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The White House won't explain why a Parkinson's specialist visited 8 times in 8 months

  • A Parkinson's disease expert repeatedly visited the White House between last summer and this spring.
  • On at least one occasion, Dr. Kevin Cannard met with President Joe Biden's White House doctor.
  • It's not immediately clear what Cannard's visits entailed.

Insider Today

The White House is refusing to say why a Parkinson's disease expert met with President Joe Biden's doctor earlier this year.

In fact, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre won't even confirm that the meeting took place — even though due to Biden's own policy, the doctor's eight visits are public information.

"I'm not going to confirm a name," Jean-Pierre said during a tense exchange with CBS reporter Ed O'Keefe. "It doesn't matter even if it is in the log. I'm not going to do that from here."

Related stories

The White House press briefing today got extremely heated between CBS News correspondent Ed O'Keefe and Karine Jean-Pierre after KJP wouldn't discuss why a Parkinson's specialist repeatedly visited the White House. "It doesn't matter how angry you get with me..." pic.twitter.com/VovyOvWklu — Justin Baragona (@justinbaragona) July 8, 2024

Here's what we do know about the expert's visits

Dr. Kevin Cannard, a neurological expert, visited the White House eight times in roughly eight months, though it's unclear what his trips entailed.

According to his official biography, Cannard is a neurologist and movement disorders specialist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. He was also described as a Neurology Consultant to the White House medical unit from 2012 to 2022. In August 2023, Cannard also published a research paper in the journal Parkinsonism & Related Disorders on the early stages of the disease.

During at least one of his visits, Cannard met with President Joe Biden's physician, Dr. Kevin O'Connor , during a January visit. It's unclear if Cannard has visited the White House since March, as the Biden White House only discloses visitor information on a delayed basis. Cannard traveled to the White House eight times between August 2023 and March of this year.

Cannard did not immediately respond to a message Business Insider left for him.

Biden's health has received renewed attention in the wake of a disastrous debate performance in which he sometimes struggled to finish his sentences and stared off into the distance on other occasions. Five Democratic lawmakers have since publicly called on the president to drop out of the 2024 race. Biden has adamantly declared he's not going anywhere.

Since the debate, Biden has repeatedly declined to commit to taking a cognitive test. He has said that the rigors of serving as commander in chief are a de facto test of his capabilities.

In February, O'Connor deemed Biden "fit for duty" and able to be president "without any exceptions or accommodations," according to a six-page summary of the president's health. O'Connor has previously not seen the need for Biden to take a detailed cognitive test. According to the February health summary, Biden did receive "an extremely detailed neurological exam" that ruled out the possibility of Parkinson's disease, stroke, multiple sclerosis, or other similar disorders.

The New York Post first wrote about one of Cannard's visits to the White House. On Monday, The New York Times published a more extensive report on Cannard's visits, citing both current and Obama-era White House visitor logs. President Joe Biden voluntarily discloses most visitors to the West Wing, an Obama-era transparency initiative that President Donald Trump scrapped during his time in office.

Watch: Surprising misconceptions about Trump and Biden ahead of the 2024 election

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Dutch ministers pledge 'rock solid' support for Ukraine on first visit to Kyiv

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Dutch Foreign Minister Veldkamp visits Ukraine

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Reporting by Olena Harmash

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Russian late opposition leader Alexei Navalny's wife Yulia attends the Munich Security Conference

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Aftermath of an Israeli strike on a house, in Nusairat refuge camp, in the central Gaza Strip

Dozens of Gazans killed in Israeli assault that Hamas warns may threaten truce talks

Palestinian officials said an Israeli airstrike in southern Gaza Strip killed dozens while advancing tanks in Gaza City forced residents to flee under fire as Israel on Tuesday stepped up an offensive that Hamas warned could jeopardise ceasefire talks.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin meets with India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi in Moscow

IMAGES

  1. About Kinosaki Onsen

    visit kinosaki facebook

  2. About Kinosaki Onsen

    visit kinosaki facebook

  3. Visit Kinosaki

    visit kinosaki facebook

  4. Kinosaki Onsen Summer Festivals 2021

    visit kinosaki facebook

  5. Visit Kinosaki

    visit kinosaki facebook

  6. What to do in Kinosaki Onsen [9 Things to do in Kinosaki]

    visit kinosaki facebook

COMMENTS

  1. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 36,597 likes · 850 talking about this · 44 were here. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  2. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki - TH. 870 likes · 9 talking about this. เพจ Facebook ภาษาไทยอย่างเป็นทางการของ Kinosaki Onsen และพื้นที่โดยรอบ เมืองโตโยโอกะ จังหวัดเฮียวโกะ

  3. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki - Facebook ... Log In

  4. Visit Kinosaki

    About Kinosaki. Famous for its 7 tattoo friendly natural hot spring baths, Kinosaki Onsen is a classic Japanese town steeped in 1,300 years of culture and tradition. See more. More about getting to Kinosaki Onsen.

  5. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 32.732 Me gusta · 15.341 personas están hablando de esto · 40 personas estuvieron aquí. The official English Facebook page of...

  6. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 36,430 "mi piace" · 569 persone ne parlanu · 43 eranu quì. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  7. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 36 676 malaiki · 1 787 varikutaura nezvazvo · 44 vanga vari pano. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  8. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 34,489 sukaan · 929 berbicara tentang ini · 39 pernah berada di sini. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  9. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki、豊岡市 - ええやん! 33,115件 · 645人がこれのこと話してんで · 40人がここにおったで - The official English Facebook page of Kinosaki Onsen, and its surrounding areas.

  10. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 36 700 tykkäystä · 714 puhuu tästä · 44 oli täällä. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  11. How to Guides

    Make hotel reservations and get information on sightseeing, dining, activities, and more in Kinosaki and its surrounding areas, 2.5 hours from Kyoto. We use cookies on this site to enhance your user experience. If you continue to browse, you accept the use of cookies on our site. ... Visit Kinosaki ...

  12. Things to Do

    Visit Kinosaki > Things to Do. Things to Do TOP RECOMMENDATIONS. Kannabe Highlands Cycling Tour. Details. Yukata Rental in Kinosaki Onsen. ... About 21 km from Kinosaki, ancient shrines and beautiful sunset beaches. Approx. distance from Kinosaki 21 km. 50 min. by car 1 hr. 45 min. by train & bus.

  13. Visit Kinosaki

    Kinosaki is a 1300 year old onsen (hot spring) town famous for 7 different public hot springs and a charming atmosphere.

  14. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 36 670 ember kedveli · 121 ember beszél erről · 45 ember járt már itt. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  15. Kinosaki Onsen Travel Guide

    Kinosaki Onsen Ropeway Station is 650 metres away, and Kono Yu Hot Spring is about a 10-minute walk. Sister hotel Nishimura Honkan, which has additional free-use hot-spring baths, is 700 metres away. Free-use bicycles are provided. Guests can relax at the hot tub or sauna, enjoy a massage or sing at the karaoke bar.

  16. Kinosaki Must-Visits Pass

    MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE. 1. AGE REQUIREMENT. Certain promotions and activities included in the Must-Visits Pass may not be available for young children. MEETING PLACE. SOZORO Tourist Information Center, 96 Kinosakicho Yushima, Toyooka, Hyogo 669-6101. ". IMPORTANT INFORMATION. ・Each Must-Visits Pass can only be used for a single person.

  17. How To Spend 2 Perfect Days In Kinosaki, Japan

    Spend a few hours perusing the local shops. There are so many of them everywhere! Pro Tip: Try to opt for an earlier train that gets you in around 11am to 1 pm. Kinosaki has this sweet spot of quietness where the previous night's guests have all left town and the current day's guests have yet to arrive in town.

  18. What to do in Kinosaki Onsen [9 Things to do in Kinosaki]

    6. Visit the Onsenji Temple in Kinosaki. 7. Visit the beaches near Kinosaki. 8. Go sea kayaking in the Sea of Japan. 9. Eat and Drink the Specialities of Kinosaki. Map of The Best Things to do in Kinosaki Onsen.

  19. Visit Kinosaki

    Visit Kinosaki, Toyooka. 36.694 de aprecieri · 898 discută despre asta · 44 au fost aici. The official English page of Kinosaki Onsen and Toyooka City.

  20. How to Visit the Kinosaki Onsens [Onsen Guide + Map]

    Mandara-Yu Onsen, Kinosaki. Opening Times of Mandara-Yu: 15:00 - 23:00. Closed days of Mandara-Yu: Wednesdays. A visit here is said to bring business prosperity, you'll find the Mandara-Yu just off the main street. There is a large indoor onsen as well as 2 small outdoor baths.

  21. Kinosaki Onsen: The Ultimate Travel Guide to Japan's 1300-Year-Old Hot

    Seasonal Events in Kinosaki Onsen Danjiri Festival. While you can visit Kinosaki Onsen any time of the year, it is recommended to plan your trip around one of its seasonal events. The picture above shows a glimpse of the Danjiri Festival, which is the biggest event in town. Held on October 14th and 15th every year, it is meant to bring in good ...

  22. Visit Kinosaki Onsen

    Kinosaki Ropeway. Mount Dashi (大師山), with an height of (only) 231m, is overlooking the small town of Kinosaki Onsen and the surrounding area. From the top, you can enjoy a beautiful panoramic view of the mountainous area. The spectacular view was awarded 1 Star by the Michelin Green Guide Japan. To get to the top, you have two options.

  23. The Best Places to Visit in Japan

    The best places to visit in Japan are off-the-beaten-track and offer opportunities for hot springs, nature, and traditional culinary delights. ... Kinosaki is an onsen town famed for its seven ...

  24. The best places to visit in Japan

    Two of the most popular and picturesque post towns are Magome and Tsumago, but it's also worth venturing to some of the others like Narai and Kiso-Fukushima. Hiking at least a section of the route is the best way to get a sense of this piece of history. You can visit centuries-old rest stops for tea—or even umeshu —along the way. If you ...

  25. 3 Big Mistakes People Traveling to Japan Make

    Grace Cheng, a 22-year-old travel blogger based in NYC, has visited Japan 11 times. She said travelers going to Japan for the first time consistently make a few mistakes. Travelers focus on Tokyo ...

  26. The White House won't explain why a Parkinson's specialist visited 8

    A Parkinson's disease expert repeatedly visited the White House between last summer and this spring. On at least one occasion, Dr. Kevin Cannard met with President Joe Biden's White House doctor.

  27. India's Modi on visit to Moscow appreciates 'dear friend' Putin

    India's relationship with Russia is based on "mutual trust and mutual respect," Prime Minister Narendra Modi said in Moscow on Tuesday, where he also said he appreciated President Vladimir Putin's ...

  28. Zelenskiy Blasts Modi's Visit to Russia as a Blow to Peace

    Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi called on his "friend" Vladimir Putin to seek a peaceful end to Russia's war in Ukraine, a day after a deadly missile strike on a children's hospital in ...

  29. Dutch ministers pledge 'rock solid' support for Ukraine on first visit

    The newly appointed Dutch defence and foreign affairs ministers have said the Netherlands' support for Ukraine is "rock solid".

  30. New group unveils petition urging Biden to 'pass the torch'

    A new group, "Pass the Torch, Joe," has formed to circulate a petition among Democratic voters that urges President Biden to step aside from the 2024 race.