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Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

The friendly staff at the Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre will handle your bookings for local tours and provide you with all the necessary information

Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

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23-27 Bromide Street, Broken Hill NSW 2880

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Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

Visitor Information Centre

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Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

The Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre is the go-to destination for anyone looking to explore the attractions and activities of the region. Located in the heart of Broken Hill’s CBD, the centre offers a range of services to visitors, including maps and brochures, accommodation and tour bookings, and local knowledge from the friendly and knowledgeable staff. The centre also features a gift shop stocked with unique souvenirs and products made by local artisans. The Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre is the perfect starting point for anyone looking to make the most of their time in the region.

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Today Broken Hill is still a working town, mining is still a major economic driver and in conjunction with the environment, agriculture, art and tourism – the city is buzzing! Not to mention the stunning, outback landscapes that surround this truly Australian city. You’ll really love the authentic and genuine people, history and landscapes.

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Home » Travel Guides » Australia » 15 Best Things to Do in Broken Hill (Australia)

15 Best Things to Do in Broken Hill (Australia)

The modern story of this city set deep in the NSW Outback begins in 1883 with the discovery of the world’s largest deposit of silver, zinc and lead.

That vast orebody is so integral to Broken Hill’s identity that there’s a towering mullock heap in the middle of the city, and even the streets are named after minerals, metals and compounds.

Beyond Broken Hill is the kind of romantic desolation that always springs to mind when you think of the Outback.

So it’s no wonder that generations of artists have chosen Broken Hill in their quest to capture the spirit of this harsh but captivating land.

Among them have been plenty of filmmakers too, and both Mad Max 2 and The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert were filmed around Broken Hill.

1. The Living Desert and Sculptures

The Living Desert and Sculptures

Couched in the Barrier Ranges just out of town is a 2,400-hectare reserve encompassing some inspiring desert scenery with panoramas that reach out for many miles.

You can traverse this patch of Outback on walking trails, and there are a few remarkable things to get up to while you’re here.

One is the John Simons Flora & Fauna Sanctuary, with free-roaming kangaroos and wallaroos, geological interpretation, a wildflower display, an arboretum with native plants and pieces of Aboriginal heritage.

And in keeping with Broken Hill’s high reputation for art, there’s the hilltop Sunset Sculptures, which were carved during a symposium in 1993. Now a symbol for Broken Hill, these 12 abstract forms were hewn from 53 tonnes of sandstone and take on a certain magic when the sun is low.

2. Line of Lode Memorial

Line of Lode Memorial

Broken Hill’s townscape is interrupted by a mountain-like mullock heap, crowned with a lookout.

This is an appropriate place to remember the mining industry’s staggering human toll, which was especially dramatic at the turn of the 20th century.

More than 800 miners have had their lives cut short in Broken Hill since 1883, and in remembrance a monument was inaugurated at the Line of Lode Lookout in 2001. This was designed by Angus Barry, Steve Kelly and Dario Palumbo, with names etched on glass panels under a structure designed to evoke the claustrophobic conditions of a mining tunnel.

You can read accompanying information plaques, while a few steps away there’s a staggering view of Broken Hill and the endless desert beyond.

3. Albert Kersten Mining and Minerals Museum (Geocentre)

Albert Kersten Mining and Minerals Museum

Broken Hill’s historic Bond Store now houses a superb museum digging up the region’s mineral heritage.

You’ll find out about Earth’s tumultuous early history and discover how the largest deposit of zinc and silver was formed under the surface in Broken Hill.

There are scores of world-class specimens illuminated in specially designed cabinets, although only a fraction of the vast inventory can be shown at one time.

One showpiece is the Silver Tree, made from 8.5kg of silver, once belonging to Charles Rasp, the boundary rider who delineated the first mining lease in Broken Hill.

Also special is a single nugget of silver weighing 42kg, while presentations at the Crystal Theatre answer the big questions about Broken Hill’s orebody and the forces that created it.

4. Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery

Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery

The oldest art gallery in regional New South Wales is in Broken Hill and dates back to 1904. The location is a carefully restored emporium, raised in 1885 and linked to two important families from Broken Hill’s past, the Sullys and the Sweetapples.

The gallery has put together a complete survey of Australian art from the colonial to the modern and contemporary periods.

For a just a snapshot of the artists represented in the collection there’s George Lambert, Arthur Streeton, John Olsen, Noel Counihan and Rupert Bunny.

The permanent collection is combined with a vibrant program of exhibitions by national, state and local artists, as well as landmark touring shows.

This is also the venue for the annual acquisitive award, The Pro Hart Outback Art Prize.

5. Pro Hart Gallery

Pro Hart Gallery

If you had to pick just one artist of European heritage to do justice to the Outback it might be the ever-creative Kevin Charles “Pro” Hart (1928-2006) who was born and died in Broken Hill.

Pro Hart’s work achieved huge popularity, capturing the scale and palette of the desert and scenes from everyday life in rural towns.

Later he was known for his sense of spectacle, working with metal and stone, using balloons and cannons in his process, and even signing his work with his own DNA to prevent forgery.

You can get to know this fascinating character at the Pro Hart Gallery, filled with dozens of his paintings and sculptures and with a documentary about his life on a loop.

6. Royal Flying Doctor Service, The Bruce Langford Visitors Centre

Royal Flying Doctor Service, The Bruce Langford Visitors Centre

The Royal Flying Doctor Service is a crucial lifeline for Australia’s most remote communities, and this visitor centre at Broken Hill Airport grants a privileged insight into this heroic organisation.

On a tour you’ll get the rare chance to see a working RFDS base in action.

The Mantle of Safety Museum meanwhile recounts almost 100 years of RFDS history, describes some of the service’s most amazing feats of heroism and offers a glimpse of the daily routine of its small army of nurses, doctors and pilots.

There’s an operational aircraft to check out in the hangar, a theatre screening educational films and a gift shop with proceeds going back into the organisation.

7. Sulphide Street Railway & Historical Museum

Sulphide Street Railway & Historical Museum

This station, rebuilt in 1905, was the terminus for the now defunct Silverton Tramway, serving Broken Hill’s mines for 58 kilometres.

It’s a lovely Federation-style building with delicate ironwork on its verandah and a picket fence in front.

The station reopened as a museum in the 1970s, preserving the Silverton Tramway’s locomotives, as well as its big collection of memorabilia.

This includes signs, lamps, tools, captivating old documents, tickets, stamps, as well as a power van and carriages from the old Silver City Comet.

The discoveries continue in the museum grounds are the Hospital Museum, Tess Alfonsi Mineral Collection, Migrant Heritage Collection and the Ron Carter Transport Pavilion.

8. Jack Absalom Gallery

Jack Absalom Gallery

The adventurer, author and artist Jack Absalom (1927-2019) was a self-taught artist, becoming a member of the Brushmen of the Bush group in the 1970s.

Down the years their exhibitions travelled across Australia and raised millions of dollars for good causes like the Royal Flying Doctor Service.

Every year Absalom would head off into the Outback for two months to paint.

And in 1997 his romantic depictions of this desertscape found a permanent home with the inauguration of his gallery.

On permanent display are 11 of Absalom’s oil paintings, on 8′ x 3′ canvases, depicting the places in Australia that most captured his imagination.

There are books and limited edition prints on sale, and you can view the extensive collection of opal that Absalom amassed on his travels.

9. Mad Max 2 Museum

Mad Max 2 Museum

We’ve seen that Broken Hill’s stark Outback has been a backdrop to several major films, from the arty psychological thriller Wake in Fright (1971) to The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994). In 1981 George Miller chose Broken Hill’s dusty desertscape as the location for the seminal Mad Max 2, and fans continue to make the pilgrimage to the region for a dose of the post-apocalypse.

One such fan is Adrian Bennett, whose ardour for Mad Max 2 has brought him all the way from Northern England to Silverton, where he has opened a suitably ramshackle museum filled with artefacts from production.

From customised vehicles to costumes and myriad props, this memorabilia has been amassed by donations but also by rummaging around the abandoned filming locations.

10. Mundi Mundi Lookout

Mundi Mundi Lookout

Fans of Mad Max 2 will instantly recognise the scenery from this rise a few kilometres north-west of Silverton.

But more than that, the lookout over the Mundi Mundi Plains gives you one of Australia’s great views.

From here, the Outback seems to continue forever and lies before you in vivid detail, to the point where you can trace the ridges of the alluvial fans in the distance.

When the sky is clear you can sense the curvature of the earth, while the colours are breathtaking as they change through the day.

The sunsets are dreamlike, when the low sun gives the desert a deep red glow, and then after dark the plains are lit up by a brilliant night sky.

11. Mutawintji National Park

Mutawintji National Park

At 130 kilometres, Broken Hill is the closest large settlement to this timeless landscape imbued with Aboriginal heritage.

Mutawintji National Park is all arid saltbush, reddish desert vistas and rocky gorges, against the gold tones of the Byngnano Ranges.

One of the state’s great displays of Aboriginal art awaits you at the park, comprising paintings, stencils and engravings, and you can pick up fascinating insights on a guided Aboriginal heritage tour.

For a self-guided walk, check out the art on the Rockholes Loop or take the Homestead Gorge Walking Track, where you may be greeted by emus and wallabies.

The Mutawintji Gorge Walking Track is an adventure through a rocky canyon ending at a hidden pool below massive red cliffs.

12. Silver City Mint & Art Centre

Silver City Mint & Art Centre

This multifaceted attraction is a sales point for locally crafted silver jewellery, art and handmade confectionery at the Mint & Art Centre’s own chocolate factory.

But maybe the biggest reason to swing by is for the Big Picture panorama, which is officially the world’s largest acrylic painting by a single artist.

This work, by local painter “Ando”, depicts an Outback landscape and is 100 metres long and 12 metres high.

You can easily lose yourself in the detail of this piece, and its 20,000 trees, 3,000 clouds, 1,500 hills and 1,000 large rocks.

13. Broken Hill Heritage Walk Tour

Broken Hill Trades Hall

A fine way to get the lowdown on Broken Hill is to join this two-hour guided walking tour around the CBD, departing from the visitor information centre.

Beginning at 10:00 on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, the volunteer-led tour shows off this unique townscape, punctuated by that barren mullock heap.

There’s a lot of heritage architecture to admire as you go, like the Palace Hotel from 1889, the Broken Hill Post Office (1892), the Broken Hill Trades Hall (1905) and the Wesley Uniting Church (1888).

14. Day Dream Mine Tour

Historic Day Dream Mine

To show how fast things moved in the pioneer days, a town was born and died at this place in the space of a decade.

Silver-bearing ore was found here, 20 kilometres north-west of Broken Hill in 1882. Within two years there was a settlement of 500 people at the Day Dream Smelter, but by the 1890s everybody had left.

With all the reusable materials from the settlement long salvaged, there’s now no sign that anybody ever lived here.

But you can enter the mine for an hour-long tour (be sure to wear sturdy shoes). The tour begins with a walk around the place where the township used to be, and you’ll see the crumbling remnants of the smelter.

Then you’ll put on a helmet and lamp to go into the mine, where men and boys as you as eight worked in candlelight using primitive methods.

Finish up with a civilised cream tea at the Daydream Tea Rooms.

15. Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

Visitor Information Centre

You better be prepared if you’re taking on the Outback, so a place like this will come in handy.

The Broken Hill Visitor Centre is in a modern building and has amenities that go way beyond a simple information point.

It’s all part of the Tourist & Travellers Centre, so there’s ample RV parking, toilets and showers and a dump point if you need to fill up on potable water.

Inside is a large branch of Gloria Jean’s Coffee Shop, together with a gift shop where you can browse handmade gifts and a wide range of local produce.

And of course, all the services you’d want from an information point are at your disposal, like friendly travel advice, maps, brochures, free Wi-Fi and a booking facility.

15 Best Things to Do in Broken Hill (Australia):

  • The Living Desert and Sculptures
  • Line of Lode Memorial
  • Albert Kersten Mining and Minerals Museum (Geocentre)
  • Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery
  • Pro Hart Gallery
  • Royal Flying Doctor Service, The Bruce Langford Visitors Centre
  • Sulphide Street Railway & Historical Museum
  • Jack Absalom Gallery
  • Mad Max 2 Museum
  • Mundi Mundi Lookout
  • Mutawintji National Park
  • Silver City Mint & Art Centre
  • Broken Hill Heritage Walk Tour
  • Day Dream Mine Tour
  • Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

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Living Desert Sculptures, Broken Hill

A 3-day itinerary in Broken Hill for art & culture

The red dirt landscapes and outback heritage of broken hill has made it an oasis for artists and art lovers. here's how to experience the desert city's creative cache in 72 hours..

Destination NSW

Destination NSW

Immerse yourself in an artistic world inspired by outback life in Broken Hill, where art galleries outnumber pubs and show off bold local personalities, sculptures come with incredible desert views and you can get up close to iconic film locations that have become part of the town’s culture. This 72-hour art and culture itinerary proves that Broken Hill is an art destination unlike any other: feel the inspiration of the landscape, meet the artists and be welcomed like a local.  

DAY ONE: Broken Hill

DAY ONE KEY FACTS:

The Living Desert Sculptures is located at:   

  • Nine Mile Road, Broken Hill, NSW 2880 
  • A 17-minute drive (12.9km) from Broken Hill centre 

On your first day in the Silver City, it’s time to absorb the region’s talent with a self-guided gallery tour. Get prepped with a coffee and croissant at Sufi Bakery , then take a walk down the town’s main strip of Argent Street, which is also home to public art such as the wood-carved Aboriginal Story Poles, and human canoe sculpture by local artist Geoff De Main. Make time to explore the oldest regional art gallery in the state, Broken Hill City Art Gallery , which houses an incredible array of important works, from local and central Australian Aboriginal artists, as well as modern pieces by Margaret Preston and Arthur Boyd. A morning spent within these walls is a thorough grounding in the region’s prolific artscape. Pick up a copy of the free Art & Culture map at the gallery or at the Visitor Centre to guide you to 54 other creative attractions in the city.  

Couple enjoying a visit to the Broken Hill City Art Gallery in Broken Hill, Outback NSW

Broken Hill City Art Gallery , Broken Hill

Afternoon  

An appetite for art requires sustenance, so meander across the road to the Silly Goat Café , Broken Hill’s coolest place to refuel and recaffeinate with smoothie bowls, smashed avo and excellent coffee. Next, stop at the Pro Hart Gallery , where you can marvel at the world-renowned artist’s most iconic works and recognisable depictions of outback life that are often as brightly coloured as the characters of the desert itself. You can even pick up a brush yourself in a painting class led by one of Pro’s children.

Pro Hart Gallery, Broken Hill

Pro Hart Gallery , Broken Hill

Sunset is the perfect time to stand among the The Living Desert Sculptures , one of the most photographed sites in Broken Hill. Created by 12 international artists in 1993, these magnificent sandstone sculptures stand proudly on a hilltop with an incredible backdrop of the endless expanse of the desert beyond. Tread the 900-metre track from the picnic area to fully appreciate the majesty of these works and snap them in their best light.   

Living Desert Sculptures in the Living Desert State Park, Broken Hill

Living Desert Sculptures in the Living Desert State Park, Broken Hill

Back in town, check into the historic Palace Hotel . This 1889 institution has stood as a grand portrait of outback life for more than 130 years, including a starring role in The Adventures of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert and resulting cult adoration. Each year in September, the hotel is the epicentre for the Broken Heel Festival , which is celebrated throughout the city. You’ll also find yourself spellbound by the hotel’s fantastically vivid murals, most of which were painted by Aboriginal artist Gordon Waye, each featuring water with the intent to create the illusion of a desert oasis. Upstairs, there are well-groomed rooms to bed down in, including the Priscilla Suite.  

Broken Heel Festival in Broken Hill, Outback NSW

Broken Heel Festival , Broken Hill

Before you retire, though, there’s fun to be had downstairs, head to the Front Bar before strolling 600 metres to The Old Salt Bush for dinner, where executive chef Lee Cecchin plates up seasonal fare using locally sourced produce and native ingredients such as finger lime, bush tomato, and, of course, saltbush.  

DAY TWO: Silverton

DAY TWO KEY FACTS: 

John Dynon Gallery is located at:     

  • 2 Stuart St, Silverton, NSW 2880 
  • A 33-minute drive (37.5km) from Broken Hill 

Start your day in a delightful time warp with a visit to the beloved Bells Milk Bar . This hallowed Broken Hill café has been serving up sweetness since 1892, but it was a renovation in the 1950s that catapulted it into the city’s cultural canon with its ‘futuristic’ style. It’s been lovingly preserved through the decades, so swing by and scoff down some peaches and cream waffles and a coffee and wander its adjoining museum full of Aussie milk bar heritage.  

Couple stepping back into time at Bells Milk Bar in Broken Hill, Outback NSW

Bells Milk Bar , Broken Hill

Your next destination is Silverton, and your first stop is Silverton Photography Gallery and Garden , where you can enjoy Helen Murray’s vignettes of outback life and stroll the ‘secret garden’. Follow up with a visit to the John Dynon Gallery with its colourful bicycle façade and equally vivid works by the iconic painter, who you may just meet onsite. 

Exterior view of the John Dynon Gallery at Silverton in Broken Hill, Outback NSW

John Dynon Gallery , Silverton

After trailing along in the dust in pursuit of fine art, you’re likely ready for a frosty beverage. Steer yourself on a two-minute walk to the remarkable Silverton Hotel . This outback public house has been operating since 1884, but took up residence in the town’s post office in 1918 after the original pub burnt down. It’s been here ever since, playing host to bush wanderers, film stars and anyone in need of a cold beer and robust meal. 

The Original Silverton Hotel, Silverton

The Original Silverton Hotel , Silverton

Try not to settle in, though, because your afternoon is scheduled for Australian film history on a visit to the Mad Max 2 Museum . Just a five-minute stroll from the hotel, pop in to ogle collectibles from George Millar’s hugely popular movie franchise Mad Max , some of which was filmed in the region. 

Mad Max 2 Museum, Silverton

Mad Max 2 Museum , Silverton

As the afternoon gives way to dusk, jump in the car for the five-minute drive to Mundi Mundi Lookout to absorb the otherworldly vastness of the Mundi Mundi Plains . With the horizon so unobstructed, you can see the curvature of the planet as you stare out to the distance, making it feel like you could be at the ends of the earth. It’s little wonder the plains made a perfect post-apocalyptic setting for Mad Max 2 . 

Sun rising over the Mundi Mundi Plains near Silverton, Broken Hill

Mundi Mundi Plains , Silverton

As darkness steals the view, return to your accommodation at The Palace Hotel in Broken Hill or spend the night at the onsite accommodation at Silverton Hotel and partake in the evening’s revelry. 

Inside the Priscilla Suite at The Palace Hotel, Broken Hill

Inside the Priscilla Suite at The Palace Hotel , Broken Hill

DAY THREE: Aviation & astronomy

DAY THREE KEY FACTS: 

Outback Astronomy is located at:     

  • 18817 Barrier Highway, Broken Hill, NSW 2880 
  • A 9-minute drive (8.4km) from Broken Hill 

Your third day in the Silver City begins at Soull Café and Espresso Bar , before you jump in the car for a 10-minute drive to discover the history and ongoing legacy of one of outback Australia’s most incredible services, The Royal Flying Doctor Outback Heritage Experience . Take a guided tour to learn about past- and present-day operations and the logistics of providing medical care to remote regions and the moving stories that go with it, or walk yourself through the hangar and control rooms from which aid is dispensed to 640,000 square kilometres of outback. 

Royal Flying Doctor Service Visitor Centre

Royal Flying Doctor Service Visitor Centre

Head back to town and swing by Willy Nilly Art to pick up a token of your stay. The studio gallery of local artist Amanda Johnson is also a retail store, where you can buy original works and prints, as well as painted décor, clothing and cards. Then pop into the family-run Amanya Mitha Indigenous Gallery to admire and purchase an authentic artefact made by Aboriginal owner Clint Kemp and his father, Paul. The gallery, which is open Saturdays (and by appointment during the week), also houses pieces from local NSW and central Australian Aboriginal artists, including jewellery, woodwork and paintings, and runs regular holiday programs for kids to create their own artefacts and learn about culture. 

Willy Nilly Art

Creatives at Willy Nilly Art, Broken Hill - Credit:  Willy Nilly Art

Spend the afternoon sipping local spirits laced with outback aromatics at Broken Hill Distillery . Work your way through a tasting flight enjoyed with a delicious meal outdoors or take a tour of the distillery to learn how they make their quandong-infused gin and Outback Moonshine. 

Broken Hill Distillery

Broken Hill Distillery

If you’ve been paying attention come nightfall, you’ll already be awestruck by the brilliance of the diamond-studded desert sky. But to truly comprehend the beauty and gob-smacking distances of those celestial bodies above, spend an evening with Outback Astronomy . Peer through telescopes and binoculars at the Milky Way, while your host fills you with astronomical amazement. Book in for a dinner before the show to spend the entire evening with the stars. It’s a fittingly glittering farewell to this heart-stealing desert city. 

Couple star gazing beneath the Milky Way at Outback Astronomy, Broken Hill

Outback Astronomy , Broken Hill 

Getting there

Broken Hill is a 13-hour drive from Sydney, 11 hours from Canberra, nine hours from Melbourne, and less than six hours from Adelaide. Otherwise, fly into Broken Hill Airport and hire a car to tour the region. Keeping in mind, you may need a 4WD to explore some unsealed roads. You can also take the Broken Hill Outback Xplorer train from Sydney or a daily connection with Transport NSW via XPT/Coach from Sydney. 

Aerial of the vast landscape in Outback NSW during a scenic drive to Broken Hill

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Broken Hill

tourist centre broken hill

  • 1.1 Tourist information
  • 2.2 By train
  • 2.3 By plane
  • 3 Get around
  • 4.1 Silverton

Broken Hill is a historic mining city in the Outback of New South Wales . Mining has occurred throughout the entire life of Broken Hill since its founding in 1883. Australia's largest mining concern BHP has its origins here with the initials BHP standing for "Broken Hill Proprietary". The mining industry has declined, but it still plays an important part in the story of the town with many tourist attractions associated with mining. The other main reason to visit Broken Hill is for the artists who have called the city home. There are many galleries around the city that are worth visiting.

tourist centre broken hill

Broken Hill and Silverton operate on Australian Central Standard Time (ACST). All other towns in the region operate on Australian Eastern Standard time (AEST). Despite its location in New South Wales, it has much closer ties to South Australia. When Australia adopted standard time in 1895, Broken Hill's only direct rail link was with South Australia's capital of Adelaide ; it was not linked by rail to Sydney until the late 1920s. Broken Hill is regarded as part of South Australia for postal parcel rates and telephone charges, and most advertising offers directed to South Australian residents specifically include Broken Hill (and by extension Silverton).

Tourist information

  • -31.960087 141.460818 1 Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre , Cnr. Blende and Bromide Streets , ☏ +61 8 8080 3560 , [email protected] . 9AM-5PM .  

It is just over 1,000 km of mostly long straight driving to Broken Hill from Sydney, and just over 500 km to Adelaide. Both roads are mostly good quality and sealed. The scenery will change slowly along the way. Broken Hill is in the outback, but is easily accessible by car. Traveling via car (even with bull-bars) from dusk to dawn should be avoided. It is the peak time for accidents with kangaroos. A large number of motorists are caught in the Outback having collisions with kangaroos. Any repairs in this isolated community can take quite a while to complete.

NSW TrainLink run weekly direct services to Broken Hill from Sydney. It is called the ' Outback Explorer' . The Sydney to Broken Hill leg is on the Monday (6:20AM–7:10PM). The return journey is on the Tuesday (7:45AM–9:48PM). NSW TrainLink also run a daily service that is a train to Dubbo from Sydney and then a bus from Dubbo to Broken Hill. Sydney to Broken Hill is 7:10AM–10:45PM and the return is 3:45AM–8:48PM.

The Indian Pacific stops at Broken Hill twice a week as it makes its way from Sydney to Adelaide and Perth. Tours of the town are included in the price of the ticket of the westbound train.

Broken Hill train station is one block from the main shopping strip and it is walking distance to some accommodation. Taxis are available at the station to meet the trains.

The airport is on the edge of South Broken Hill. Taxis are available at the airport into the town centre. Ask the flight attendant to arrange for a taxi pickup.

NSW Trainlink (see 'By Train' above) offer a combined train and bus route from Sydney via Dubbo.

Buses R Us have three scheduled services per week between Adelaide and Broken Hill. The travel time is about 7 hours. Greyhound (formerly McCafferty) no longer offer a service to Broken Hill from Adelaide and V Line only offers a service as far as Mildura (from Melbourne).

Map

Coach tours are an option. Taxis are also available. But you will need a car to see the town and surroundings independently. This poses problems for the adventurous. Rental cars in the city often charge a premium for travelling further than 100–200 km, which is easy to do. After that, the rate is generally 25 cents a kilometre. Driving on unsealed roads is only allowed if you hire a four-wheel drive; even then, if you have an accident, you are liable for the entire insurance excess. So getting off the beaten track is difficult. At least one company only lets you drive to Menindee or Silverton.

Avis and Thrifty rental car offices are located in Argent St. in the town centre. The Hertz office is in the Visitor Centre building.

tourist centre broken hill

  • -31.962462 141.466284 1 Miner's Memorial . Located on the top of the mullock heap on the edge of the CBD is the Line of Lode Miner's Memorial and Red Earth Cafe. Good views over the town and desert. Gain road access behind the railway track via Iodide St. and McGillvray Dve. You can also walk up that road but there is no shade. Free . ( updated Jun 2015 )
  • The film sets . A number of films have been produced in and around Broken Hill over the years, for example; Priscilla Queen of the Desert, Mad Max 2 and Race The Sun.  
  • -31.945072 141.447284 3 Pro Hart Gallery and Sculpture Park , 108 Wyman St . Contains a large collection of the noted Australian artist Kevin 'Pro' Hart's paintings and sculptures, as well as many artistic works of others that Hart collected during his lifetime. The gallery also features the Rolls Royce that he painted in his unique style. Pro was born in Broken Hill, New South Wales, was considered the father of the Australian Outback painting movement and his works are widely admired for capturing the true spirit of the outback. He was nicknamed "Professor" (hence "Pro") during his younger days, when he was known as an inventor. ( updated Jun 2015 )
  • -31.937392 141.477527 4 Afghan Mosque , Williams St . Established by the Afghan camel riders who helped get the town started back in the 1880s. Tours can be arranged through the Broken Hill visitor's centre. ( updated Jun 2015 )
  • -31.997195 141.471368 5 Royal Flying Doctor Service Bruce Langford Visitor Centre , Broken Hill Airport . 9AM-5PM . Tours and exhibits in the local RFDS base. $7 . ( updated Jun 2015 )
  • -31.939562 141.447832 6 Badsha Mahommed Gool's Ice Cream Cart , White Rocks Historic Site, Schlapp St . A replica cart at an infamous rocky outcrop on the edge of the town, this is the site of the so-called 'Battle of Broken Hill' in 1915. Essentially two Indian-Muslims went 'postal' and killed a bunch of people, after firing 30 or so shots on a special train of picnic-goers, over disputes of halal-meal. Even though a lot of films have been shot in BH, this bizarre story is yet to be turned into one! ( updated Jun 2015 )
  • -31.898849 141.451111 7 Sculpture Symposium and Living Desert Reserve , Off Nine Mile Road, 9 km north of town . The centrepiece is a hill containing a number of stone sculptures built in 1993. Very popular for sunset (look out for wildlife when driving back). There are also some walks through desert plants and multitudes of kangaroos. The hill is a 1-km walk from the parking lot. If you need direct access, contact the visitor centre. $5 . ( updated Jun 2015 )
  • -31.837 141.202 9 Mundi Mundi Lookout . See the sunset in the outback, just out of town. There are a few favourite pieces of high ground where the sun looks like it drops off the end of the world. The best spot is the lookout just west of Silverton, overlooking the Mundi Mundi plain. Truly spectacular.  
  • -31.888389 141.222361 10 Mad Max 2 Museum , 9 Stirling St , ☏ +61 8 8088 6128 . 10AM–4PM . A small museum that gives you a real insight of Mad Max 2 . There's a large exhibit of cars used (with some replicas) and the looks and feels really make it feel like you're in an apocalyptic world.  
  • Mine tours . You can go underground in the mining shaft and get a real experience of mining. Active mining in the vicinity had caused the mine to close to tourists. The Daydream Mine is just out of town on the road to Silverton , and is much smaller, but gives an impression of what mining was like in the 19th century, when all of the work was done by hand.  
  • Broken Hill is a major base for the Royal Flying Doctors Service and for the School of the Air . Expensive but fun!
  • -31.9975 141.4715 1 Silver City Scenic Flights , Airport Road ( Arrive at Broken Hill airport on a Regional Express scheduled flight. Collection from Broken Hill railway station or Tourist Information Centre also possible for pre-bookings. ), ☏ +61 457155393 , [email protected] . Silver City Scenic Flights shows you the Australian Outback landscape from the air. This affords amazing views of Broken Hill, the Barrier range, Flinders Range and Mildura areas, including the Menindee Lakes and Lake Eyre. Flying in their high winged aircraft provides unrivaled visibility of features that can not be seen from the ground. Silver City Scenic Flights offer a range of tours and air safaris with destinations throughout Central Australia. Broken Hill, Mildura, Menindee Lakes, White Cliffs, the Darling and Murray Rivers, Flinders Ranges, Wilpena Pound, Lake Eyre, Simpson Desert, Birdsville, Bourke & Wills camp 65 on the Cooper River, Coober Pedy, Mungo National Park and Uluru are all options. A 25-minute local scenic flight over Broken Hill starts at $95. A full-day air safari for two people to Lake Eyre, including Wilpena Pound, Lake Frome, Leigh Creek, William Creek and Arkaroola, costs $2140 per person. $95-2140 . ( updated Mar 2015 )
  • -31.870352 141.214303 2 Visit Silverton . Visit the ghost town of Silverton, 26 km away, visit the Mad Max museum and all the local artist galleries. ( updated Jan 2016 )
  • Silverton Self-Guided Heritage Walk . A self-guided heritage walk showcasing the remaining iconic historic buildings.

Broken Hill has developed a thriving artistic community. Take a browse through some of the art galleries and outlets in and around the town.

  • Broken Hill Regional Art Gallery
  • Jack Absalom's Gallery
  • Pro Hart Gallery , 108 Wyman St , ☏ +61 8 8087 2441 . Includes examples of Pro's painting and sculpture over three floors. Some of Pro's painted cars, including a Rolls Royce, are on display.  
  • -31.96239 141.46636 1 Broken Earth Cafe , Federation way , ☏ +61 2 8087 1297 . Have a snack on the top of the mullock heap at the cafe and enjoy the view of the CBD. ( updated Jun 2018 )
  • Surprisingly for a town with such a small population, Broken Hill has a burgeoning nightlife. Many clubs exist and are open most nights of the week until late. Establishments catering to both locals and tourists include the Musician's Club and the Democratic Club.
  • Try a spider at Bell's milk bar.

As one would predict for a mining town, Broken Hill has its fair share of bars but those expecting frontier style pubs will be disappointed. The majority of bars in Broken Hill are of the RSL club style, full of cheap drinks and pokie machines. Don't miss out on a game of two-up at the Musicians Club held on Friday and Saturday nights. The Barrier Social Democratic Club holds a disco night on Saturday night in which the young people from the town come out to play.

There are no upscale chains in Broken Hill. Best to seek out one of the renovated historic hotels.

  • -31.9664 141.5153 1 Mulberry Vale , 10690 Menindee Rd ( 5 km from the city centre ), ☏ +61 8 8088 1597 , +61 428 858 374 . Outback cabins with a range of self-contained accommodation sleeping up to 5 guests with everything supplied. Mulberry vale also caters for a number of functions in the rustic atmosphere of the Gallery.  
  • The Royal Exchange Hotel , 320 Argent St , ☏ +61 8 8087 2308 . Historic with nice atmosphere. Have a beer. ( updated Oct 2020 )
  • Comfort Inn Crystal , 326 Crystal St , ☏ +61 8 8088 2344 . Check-in: 1PM , check-out: 10AM . A hotel very close to the train station. ( updated Feb 2024 )

Obtain a key from the Information Centre to see the Sculpture Symposium about 6 km from the city. The key allows car access to the sculpture site. Alternatively drive to the car park and walk 2 km to the site. A $10 park access charge is levied, payable at an honesty box near the site.

The historic boomtown of Silverton which has been the setting of several movies. Even though it 'poses' as a ghost town nowadays, it does in fact maintain a tiny population, having a camel farm. You can explore at will the ruined church and the Silverton Tramway, a now abandoned trainline which runs into South Australia.

The opal mining town of White Cliffs is an interesting spot to visit or for prospecting.

Stephens Creek Reservoir is an artificial dam 17 km north east of Broken Hill.

When full of water, the Menindee lakes make a spectacular and surreal sight in the otherwise arid landscape. A drive through the river red gum forest in the adjacent Kinchega National Park is also worthwhile. Several quarries are worth exploring and the Mundi-Mundi plains too, perfect for a romantic sunset.

Drive further to and through Mungo National Park to discover some old human history.

Head north on the Silver City Highway to Tibooburra and the remote Sturt National Park .

Head down to World Heritage-listed Mungo National Park .

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Astronomy tourism business ready to fight Hydrostor's billion-dollar Broken Hill renewable energy project

A mine near Broken Hill at sunset with the horizon and the city.

When Broken Hill-based tourism operators Linda and Travis Nadge heard of the interest in turning a nearby mine site into a large-scale energy project, the alarm bells started ringing.

Canadian green energy company Hydrostor hopes to develop Australia's first compressed air storage site in Perilya's Potosi mine site, an underground operation a few kilometres east of Broken Hill.

After months of investigating how this project may impact their stargazing business a short distance away, the Nadges say they have now "legalled up".

Conflict written in the stars

The Nadges said ongoing light pollution, and the disturbances associated with 24/7 construction of the Hydrostor renewable energy site, raised significant concerns for them.

"We're here to create an experience on the night sky, and [we've] got a power station next to us. The concern [is] how authentic does that make us?" Mr Nadge said.

They have been communicating with Hydrostor for over 18 months but are yet to come to a resolution.

A man and a woman wearing dark clothing smiling next to a telescope at night.

Despite the company making a financial offer as a form of compensation, the Nadges said it was inadequate.

"It was a paltry figure to say 'shut up and go away'," Mrs Nadge said.

"It's not what we're about. And there's been no indication [that] they even care about our tourism business."

The Nadges say if Hydrostor does not engage in a more "substantial way", the issue could "very much" end up in court.

Consultation and co-existing

A man in a shirt and jeans wearing a lanyard smiling and standing by a blue stall in a symposium

This week, Hydrostor's senior vice president in origination and development Martin Becker visited Broken Hill to meet with key stakeholders.

In a statement provided to the ABC, Mr Becker said a big part of his visit focused on better understanding "any remaining concerns" of locals.

"We are mindful of all parties' views and remain committed to addressing these quickly," Mr Becker said.

"We are confident that there is a path for the project to co-exist with all stakeholders in a positive manner."

Broken Hill City Council Mayor Tom Kennedy has been a long-time proponent of the Hydrostor project and its potential to generate hundreds of new jobs .

Two men, one in a blue shirt and pants and the other in pants and an orange fluro shirt, holding shovels with dirt

While he encouraged community members like the Nadges to share their legitimate feedback, he hoped it will not end in a legal battle that puts financial strain on all parties and potentially delays a "project of state significance".

"I support the project with the understanding that it can have an impact on that business, and I do hope they can sort it out," Cr Kennedy said.

"But for me [as mayor], I have to do what I believe is good for the entire city."

What do the experts say? 

Professor John Cole, an emeritus professor at the Institute for Resilient Regions at the University of Southern Queensland, agreed that places like Broken Hill could benefit hugely from the renewable energy industry.

"Local renewable energy in the region itself should mean all kinds of opportunities, particularly for agricultural businesses, energy intensive industries, and indeed to achieve efficiency by having it provided so close to the actual point of use," Professor Cole said.

He added projects like this were usually all about serving the cities, and this conflict only added to the pattern seen nationally of regional communities hesitating to embrace renewable energy initiatives.

"[Government mindsets are] all about building these wind farms, the solar energy farms etcetera, in the regions and then building enormous transmission grids which have their own environmental and local impacts," he said.

"In places like Victoria [they've] been a major source of contention.

"It's the old story of the cities needing something and the regions bearing the pain or the cost of providing."

Despite noting the positives of the Hydrostor project, Professor Cole said it was equally important its introduction does not result in a "win-loss scenario".

Profile of a man.

"It's important that the local authorities take the broader view and not always just jump for what's in front of them," Professor Cole said.

"Surely in a place like western NSW there's space enough for an astronomy business and a new renewable energy development."

The Nadges are certainly hoping this is true.

"We've invested ten years and we had another 10 plus years in our head," Mr Nadge said.

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  • 1. Kintore Reserve
  • 2. Duke of Cornwall Hotel -1888
  • 3. Daydream Hotel - 1888
  • 4. Barrier Boarding House -1888
  • 5. Shops - c1890
  • 6. Willyama Hotel -1905
  • 7. Old Railway Station - 1919
  • 8. BHP Chimney - 1885
  • 9. BHP Slag Heap - 1886
  • 10. BHP Mill Foundations - 1897
  • 11. Delprat Shaft - 1900
  • 12. Mullockers Memory
  • 13. Line of Lode Miners’ Memorial and Visitors Centre
  • 14. Former Crown Hotel - c 1890
  • 15. Former Wilcannia Club Hotel - 1888
  • 16. Railway Station - 1957
  • 17. Bond Store - 1890
  • 18. Former Crystal Hotel
  • 19. Former Miners Arms Hotel -c 1890
  • 20. Duke of Cornwall Park
  • 21. Central School - 1907
  • 22. Gaol - 1891
  • 23. High School - 1919
  • 24. Former Police Barracks - 1900
  • 25. Central School Building - 1900
  • 26. Pig and Whistle Hotel - 1890
  • 27. Synagogue - 1910
  • 28. Joe Keenan Lookout
  • 29. Sulphide Street Cottages - c1900
  • 30. Hospital - 1941
  • 31. Thomas Street Uniting Church - 1911
  • 32. Regeneration Reserve
  • 33. White Rocks Reserve
  • 34. Cummins Street Residences - c1890
  • 35. Thomas Street Residences - c1890
  • 36. Tydvil Hotel - 1891
  • 37. Mulga Hill Hotel - 1890
  • 38. Oxide Street Row Cottages - c1890
  • 39. St Andrews Uniting Church - 1905
  • 40. St Peters Anglican Church - 1928
  • 41. Former Caledonian Hotel - 1898
  • 42. Catholic Bishop’s Residence - 1887
  • 43. Sacred Heart Cathedral and adjacent Convent 1905 and 1900
  • 44. Sacred Heart College - 1927
  • 45. The Towers - c1890
  • 46. Wesley Church - 1888
  • 47. Sturt Park
  • 48. Trades Hall - 1898/1904
  • 49. YMCA - c1890
  • 50. Miners Lamp Motel - 1888
  • 51. Imperial Hotel - 1888
  • 52. Scout Hall - 1900
  • 53. Old Royal Hotel - 1904
  • 54. Iodide Street Row Cottages - c1890
  • 55. Wades Shop - c1890
  • 56. Baptist Church - 1917
  • 57. Shop and Residence - c1890
  • 58. Williams Street Residences - c1890
  • 59. Mosque - 1891
  • 60. North Primary School - 1902
  • 61. School of the Air - 1956
  • 63. South Australian Brewery - 1893
  • 64. North Mine
  • 65. Junction Hotel - 1892
  • 66. Junction Circle - 1950
  • 67. Thompson Shaft - 1910
  • 68. Junction Mine and Lookout
  • 69. British Mine Housing - c1910
  • 70. MMM Dumps
  • 71. All Nations Hotel - 1891
  • 72. Assay Office c1890
  • 73. Central Power Station - 1930
  • 74. Former Central Mine Manger’s Residence (now St Ann’s Nursing Home)
  • 75. Alma Hotel -1891
  • 76. South Broken Hill Hotel - 1889
  • 77. Former South Police Station - 1889
  • 78. South Post Office - 1898
  • 79. South Fire Station - c1900
  • 80. Patton Park
  • 81. Bells Milk Bar – 1956
  • 82. Alma Mechanic’ Institute – 1898
  • 83. Former Salvation Army Hall 1900
  • 84. Gladstone Hotel - 1888
  • 85. South Primary School 1910
  • 86. St James Anglican Church 1903
  • 87. South Baptist Church - 1911
  • 88. South Mine Offices - 1910
  • 89. Zinc Oval and Zinc Mine (not accessible to the public)
  • 90. Former All Saints Catholic Church - 1890
  • 91. Union Club Hotel - c1890
  • 92. Zinc Lakes - 1948
  • 93. NBHC Mine Housing - c1950
  • 94. NBHC Mine Haulage and Service Shafts –1946 (not open to the public
  • 95. Southern Cross Shaft - 1966
  • 96. South Mine Headframes 1919/1932
  • 97. Ryan Street Cottages - 1890
  • 98. A.J. Keast Park
  • 99. Hillside Hotel - 1891
  • 100. Burke Ward Hall - 1905
  • 101. Railwaytown Post Office - 1925
  • 102. Nicholls Street Methodist Church - c1890
  • 103. Cornish Street Lookout
  • 104. Broken Hill Cemetery - 1889
  • 105. Former Freiberg Hotel - 1899
  • 106. Burke Ward School - 1897
  • 107. Ambush Site
  • 108. St Marys Catholic Church - 1922
  • 109. Railwaytown Baptist Church - 1913
  • 110. The Salvation Army Hall 1960
  • 111. The Former Railway Town Post Office - 1900
  • 112. The Gasworks Hotel - 1891
  • 113. St Phillips Anglican Church - 1903
  • 114. The South Australian Hotel
  • 115. Railway Residences 1890
  • 116. Tramway Residence - 1902
  • 117. Rising Sun Hotel - 1888
  • 118. Block 10 Lookout
  • 119. Queen Elizabeth Park
  • Patton Street Park
  • Queen Elizabeth Park
  • National Heritage Listing
  • Cameron Corner
  • Sturt's Steps
  • White Cliffs

tourist centre broken hill

Adam offers high-quality, hands-on photographic experiences sharing some of the best landscapes and scenery in the Outback.

tourist centre broken hill

To get a sense of why Broken Hill was named Australia’s first heritage city, slow down and take a stroll around town with an expert.

tourist centre broken hill

Asimulated mine constructed using period correct mining timber, one gets the sensation of underground without going under.

tourist centre broken hill

H&A Air is an outback aviation provider based out of Broken Hill, run by husband and wife team, Hugh and Aliza Lord.

tourist centre broken hill

You will never forget seeing an outback sky at night. Head to Outback Astronomy, a dark-sky location just a 10-minute drive outside Broken Hill.

tourist centre broken hill

Come explore the wonders of Australia with Overland Adventures!...

tourist centre broken hill

Go behind the scenes and discover what it takes to save lives in the outback at the Royal Flying Doctor Outback Heritage Experience.

tourist centre broken hill

Silver City Tours specialise in showcasing the unique landscape of outback New South Wales through a variety of tours.

tourist centre broken hill

This tour looks at Barkindji occupation, cultural heritage, sustainability, medicinal and food plants surrounding the Menindee Lakes (Wontanella) and Darling river (Baaka).

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  1. Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

    Email: [email protected]. Phone: (08) 8080 3560. Website: https://www.visitbrokenhill.com. The friendly staff at the Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre will handle your bookings for local tours and provide you with all the necessary information for your step into the Great Outback. The centre has a range of facilities, including ...

  2. Home Broken Hill, Australia

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    The Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre (BHVIC) is part of the Accredited Visitor Information Centre Network and has welcomed visitors from all over the world for the last 40 years. Heritage Walk Tours. The Broken Hill Heritage Walk Tour is a two hour volunteer guided tour through Broken Hill's CBD. The Heritage Walk Tour is a great ...

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    The friendly staff at the Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre will handle your bookings for local tours and provide you with all the necessary information for your step into the Great Outback. The centre has a range of facilities, including showers, toilets and disabled access for visitors. Browse through their gift shop and take home a ...

  7. Broken Hill & The Outback > Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre

    The friendly staff at the Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre will handle your bookings for local tours and provide you with all the necessary information for your step into the Great Outback. The centre has a range of facilities, including showers, toilets and disabled access for visitors. Browse through their gift shop and take home a ...

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    Located in the heart of the Australian Outback, Broken Hill is a unique and fascinating destination that offers something for everyone. Explore the rich mining history of the region by visiting the various museums and galleries, or take in the stunning natural beauty of the surrounding desert landscape. With plenty of outdoor activities on ...

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    Visitor Centres. Closed now. 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Write a review. About. The friendly staff at the Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre will handle your bookings for local tours and provide you with all the necessary information for your step into the Great Outback. The centre has a range of facilities, including showers, toilets and disabled ...

  13. THE 15 BEST Things to Do in Broken Hill

    Things to Do in Broken Hill, Australia - Broken Hill Must-See Attractions. 1. Royal Flying Doctor Service. 2. Pro Hart Gallery. 3. The Broken Hill Sculptures & Living Desert Sanctuary. 4. Broken Hill Mining Museum and Whites Mineral Art Gallery.

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    Broken Hill's comprehensive suite of walking and driving tours are detailed in individual brochures available from the Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre. School of the Air Today, radio communication has mostly given way to email, intranet and social media over satellitelinked internet, but the education connection between students and ...

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    The Silver Trail Drive starts at the Visitor Information Centre. It is about 40km long and can be completed in 2-3 hours excepting stops for museums or galleries. It is divided into two parts 1-65 cover the main residential and commercial areas of central and North Broken Hill.

  17. Broken Hill, Outback NSW

    The Broken Heel Festival, held in September, features divas, DJs, and live music that pays homage to the iconic film and stage musical Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.Other great Broken Hill events are the Heritage Festival in April and the Perfect Light Film Festival in March.. Eat, drink & play There's plenty of ways to enjoy a cold drink in Broken Hill, from classic pubs and bars such as ...

  18. 15 Best Things to Do in Broken Hill (Australia)

    15. Broken Hill Visitor Information Centre Source: TK Kurikawa / shutterstock Visitor Information Centre. You better be prepared if you're taking on the Outback, so a place like this will come in handy. The Broken Hill Visitor Centre is in a modern building and has amenities that go way beyond a simple information point.

  19. All Attractions Broken Hill, Australia

    The Silver City Mint and Art Centre is an iconic tourism attraction, featuring an art gallery, silversmiths and chocolate factory all rolled into one. Twin Lakes ... In partnership with Broken Hill City Council, the YMCA-managed Broken Hill Aquatic Centre provides high-quality aquatic and recreation facilities and programs.

  20. Broken Hill, Outback NSW

    About as far west as you can go before hitting the border, Broken Hill is one of NSW's most legendary outback towns. But its streets are coloured in more than just red dirt, take a wander and you'll find a vibrant cultural melting pot: the heartland of Australian mining, an LGBTQIA+ icon thanks to its star-making role as the backdrop in the hit film Priscilla Queen of The Desert, and the ...

  21. A 3-day itinerary in Broken Hill for art & culture

    Pro Hart Gallery, Broken Hill. Sunset is the perfect time to stand among the The Living Desert Sculptures, one of the most photographed sites in Broken Hill. Created by 12 international artists in 1993, these magnificent sandstone sculptures stand proudly on a hilltop with an incredible backdrop of the endless expanse of the desert beyond.

  22. Broken Hill

    Broken Hill is a major base for the Royal Flying Doctors Service and for the School of the Air. Expensive but fun! 1 Silver City Scenic Flights, Airport Road (Arrive at Broken Hill airport on a Regional Express scheduled flight. Collection from Broken Hill railway station or Tourist Information Centre also possible for pre-bookings.

  23. Astronomy tourism business ready to fight Hydrostor's billion-dollar

    When Broken Hill-based tourism operators Linda and Travis Nadge heard of the interest in turning a nearby mine site into a large-scale energy project, the alarm bells started ringing.

  24. Tours Broken Hill, Australia

    Broken Hill Heritage Walk Tour To get a sense of why Broken Hill was named Australia's first heritage city, slow down and take a stroll around town with an expert. ... Visitor Information Centre. Corner of Blende Street and Bromide Street Broken Hill, NSW 2880. T (08) 8080 3560 E [email protected]. Broken Hill City Council Share ...