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Visitor Visa for Child Under 18 to Australia

  • May 13, 2024

Visitor Visa for Child Under 18 to Australia

If you are planning to bring a child under the age of 18 to Australia as a visitor, there are some specific requirements and considerations that you will need to take into account. For a subclass 600 visa, both parents (or all people with custody of the child) must provide their consent for the child to travel to Australia if both parents are not travelling with the child.

Visitor visa for child under 18 to Australia

Here is a step-by-step guide to help you obtain a child tourist visa to Australia :

  • Determine the type of visa required: The first step in obtaining a visitor visa for a child under 18 is to determine the type of visa that is required. In most cases, a visitor visa will be sufficient for a short-term stay in Australia for tourism or visiting family and friends. However, if the child will be participating in activities such as study or work, a different type of visa may be required.
  • Gather the necessary documents: To apply for a visitor visa, you will need to provide certain documents to support your application. This may include:
  • A valid passport for the child
  • Birth certificate or other proof of the child’s identity
  • A certified copy of the child’s birth certificate
  • A certified copy of the passport of the parent not travelling with the child
  • Child travel consent form Australia (or travel consent form for minor Australia) : Signed Form 1229 by the non-travelling parent (Consent form to grant an Australian visitor visa to a child under the age of 18 years)
  • Evidence of the child’s relationship to the person responsible for their welfare while in Australia (if applicable)
  • A letter of consent from the person with parental responsibility for the child (if applicable)
  • Evidence of the purpose of the visit, such as a letter of invitation from a host in Australia or confirmation of travel arrangements
  • Evidence of sufficient financial means to support the child’s stay in Australia, such as bank statements or pay stubs
  • Complete the visa application: Once you have gathered all of the necessary documents, you will need to complete the online visa application form. You may be required to provide additional information or documents during the application process.
  • Pay the visa application fee: You will need to pay a fee to apply for a visitor visa for a child under 18. The amount of the fee will depend on the specific circumstances of your application.
  • Submit the application: Once you have completed the application form and paid the fee, you will need to submit the application. You may be required to attend an interview or provide additional information or documents as part of the application process.
  • Wait for a decision: Once you have submitted your application, you will need to wait for a decision to be made. The processing time for a visitor visa for a child under 18 can vary, so it is important to plan ahead and apply well in advance of your intended travel date.

How to fill out form 1229

This is the form that needs to filled out if one parent of the child will not be accompanying the child to Australia. It does depend on your custody orders so double check the form to see if it applies to you. Otherwise, it’s a pretty straightforward form, requiring the details of the child and their parents.

Overall, obtaining a visitor visa for a child under 18 to Australia requires careful planning and attention to detail. By gathering the necessary documents and completing the application process accurately, you can increase your chances of success in obtaining a visa for your child.

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Travelling with children.

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This page is for Australian parents and children travelling overseas.

Read this page to learn about:

  • what to do before you travel
  • children travelling without one or both parents
  • child custody
  • international child abduction

What to do before you travel

  • Read the  travel advice for your destinations  and  subscribe for updates . Also read about your transit locations.
  • Buy  travel insurance  that covers your whole family. Read the fine print and know what it covers.
  • Look online for tips on travelling with kids in the country you're going to.
  • Leave an itinerary with someone at home. Plan to keep in contact.

Local laws and culture

Research the local laws and culture where you're going. They may differ from what you're used to in Australia.

  • Check the safety standards of any equipment you'll use. This includes pools, balconies, car seats, cots and play equipment.
  • Find out local attitudes towards breastfeeding in public.
  • Learn the laws around disciplining children. In some countries, physical punishment is illegal, including smacking.

Research any childcare you plan to use overseas. Standards in other countries may vary.

  • the accreditation of providers
  • the provider's child abuse prevention plans
  • how they screen their staff, including police checks and qualifications
  • the ratio of staff to children
  • staff training, including first aid and emergency processes
  • security on the premises
  • their injury liability insurance.

Staying healthy

Take your children to a doctor or travel clinic at least 8 weeks before you leave.

  • Get a basic health check-up.
  • Ask if your travel plans may affect their health.
  • Plan any  vaccinations  they need.
  • Find out if there are common health risks for kids where you'll travel.

Check if your child's medicine is legal where you're going. For example, some countries control or ban ADHD medicines.

Some over-the-counter medicines are also banned overseas.

  • Check the 'health' section of  your destination's travel advice .
  • Talk to the  embassy or consulate of that country .

See our advice on  taking care of your health . And read  more about travelling with medication .

Children travelling without one or both parents

There are laws around children travelling without both parents. Airlines also have rules you must follow.

Travelling with only one parent

You may need extra documents if only one parent is travelling. Particularly if you don't have the same surname as your child.

For example, you may need:

  • proof of the other parent or guardian's consent for the child to travel
  • proof of any custody agreements
  • proof of guardianship
  • adoption papers
  • a certified copy of their birth certificate. Particularly if it doesn't list the travelling parent.

Travelling without parents

Most airlines have rules for children under 15 who travel alone. You may need to fill out a permission form. Contact your airline for details, including in-flight protocols for kids travelling alone.

The country your child travels to may also have forms you must complete. Contact the  embassy or consulate of the country they're going to . Find out if there are entry rules for children before they travel.

Child travel consent

Your child may need a consent letter if they travel:

  • with someone who isn't their parent or guardian, such as a school group or grandparent.

The letter usually states:

  • the child's name, gender and place and date of birth
  • who the child is with
  • where the child is going
  • the child's passport information.

The letter should be signed by the parents and  witnessed by a public official .

Child custody

Before taking your child overseas, you must get consent from anyone with parental responsibility for them. Or get a court order to let them travel. You may be breaking the law if you don't.

Many countries recognise Australian parenting orders. Some will not.

Read  more about international family law and children  (Attorney-General's Department).

Child support payments

Your child support payments must be up-to-date before you can leave Australia. Services Australia can stop you from leaving if they aren't. If you have overdue child support and haven't made a payment plan:

  • call 131 272 to discuss your options
  • visit  the Services Australia website .

Dual nationality and child custody

Some countries don't recognise  dual nationality . This can affect how local authorities make custody decisions.

Get legal advice before travelling with children who may be dual nationals.

Stop orders on women and children

In some countries, husbands or relatives can place a 'stop order' on women and children. A stop order can stop a person from leaving the country, regardless of nationality.

Contact the nearest Australian embassy or consulate if you or your child are being stopped from returning to Australia.

International child abduction

If you think someone may try to take your child out of Australia without your consent, report it. Get legal advice, they can help you:

  • get a court order to register your children on the Australian Federal Police's  Family Law Watchlist
  • submit a Child Alert Request with the  Australian Passport Office .

Learn more about  international child abduction  (Attorney-General's Department).

Help from the Attorney-General's Department

The Attorney-General's Department may be able to help if someone has taken your child overseas without your consent.

Contact the International Family Law Section:

The help they can give you depends on where your child is taken.

Help from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

If someone has taken your child while you're overseas, contact the  Consular Emergency Centre .

DFAT can give:

  • a list of local lawyers
  • information on local child welfare agencies or organisations
  • consular help to the parent who is left behind.

You may also find a lawyer overseas through:

  • International Academy of Family Lawyers
  • Find out more about buying travel insurance .
  • Check which vaccinations you should get .
  • See our advice for  pregnancy ,  adoption  and  surrogacy  overseas.
  • Carry-on luggage restrictions  (Department of Home Affairs)
  • Separated parents  (Services Australia)

Related content

In many countries age, gender and sexual preferences can pose challenges. Understanding the culture and laws in your destination will help things go smoothly.

Read more about the legislative protections designed to prevent child sex offences abroad.

If you're pregnant and planning to travel overseas, research your destination before you go. Being informed about the risks will help you manage them.

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Child custody for an Australian Visa: Do I Need a Form 1229?

Home > Family > Child custody for an Australian Visa: Do I Need a Form 1229?

Form 1229

It is essential that anyone with parental responsibility for a child give permission for them to be granted an Australian visa. This includes both temporary and permanent visas. If you intend to travel to Australia with a child under 18 years of age, you might need to complete a Form 1229 if the child has:

  • a non-accompanying parent(s); or
  • other person(s) with parental responsibility for them.

This article deals with circumstances where a Form 1229 is required, and why.

What is public interest criterion 4017?

Most visas are subject to public interest criterion ( PIC ) 4017 (commonly referred to as the ‘custody criteria’). PIC 4017 exists to ensure that a child cannot be granted a visa where there are unresolved custody or residence issues.

One of the following must be met to satisfy PIC 4017:

  • The child’s home country permits them to travel to Australia; or
  • Each person who has legal rights to determine where the child is to live consents to the grant of the visa; or
  • The grant of the visa would be consistent with any relevant Australian child order in force.

Who does PIC 4017 apply to?

PIC 4017 refers to persons “under the age of 18”. This means that all applicants under the age of 18 need to satisfy this requirement. This includes any child who is not the dependent child of the main applicant.

PIC 4017 therefore applies to any person who is:

  • included in the visa application; and
  • eligible to be included as a ‘member of the family unit’.

Parental responsibility (custody)

Where a child is travelling with both parents, satisfying PIC 4017 is a straightforward process. In most cases, a full birth certificate showing the names of both migrating parents will usually be sufficient.

Where a child is travelling with one parent who has full parental responsibility, satisfying PIC 4017 may be achieved by providing the relevant court or custody documentation that demonstrates this.

Where another parent (who is not included in the application or not accompanying the child) has some parental responsibility, then their consent for the grant of the visa to the child is likely to be required.

Providing consent

To satisfy PIC 4017, the main question to be addressed is whether the adult supporting the application (e.g., the visa sponsor or family head) has the sole right to decide where the child can live.

There are a number of reasons why a non-accompanying adult will have parental responsibility for a child. For example, some common circumstances this might occur include where:

  • only the child and one parent are visa applicants;
  • the child is applying with one biological parent and a step-parent; or
  • the child’s grandparent has a residence order.

In such cases, consent must be provided by any non-accompanying person with responsibility for the child.

The easiest way to provide consent is by completing a Form 1229 . Alternatively, a Statutory Declaration from each person with parental responsibility will be suitable.

Completing a Form 1229

The Form 1229 is a relatively straightforward document. It requires details regarding the:

  • purpose of the child’s visit to Australia;
  • child’s identity document/s; and
  • non-accompanying parent/person’s details.

You should also attach the following to the Form 1229 :

  • a certified copy of the child’s/children’s birth certificate(s);
  • a certified identity document of the non-accompanying parent/person (e.g., passport, birth certificate, or national identity card).

The Form 1229 and the accompanying evidence should be uploaded to the relevant visa application via ImmiAccount .

Children With a Deceased Parent

As mentioned above, a birth certificate is usually sufficient to demonstrate a parent-child relationship.

However, where the child’s other parent is deceased, you will need to provide a copy of their death certificate to confirm you have sole responsibility for the child.

I Am Travelling to Australia on a Holiday: Do I Need to Provide a Form 1229?

Most temporary and permanent Australian visas must meet PIC 4017 . This includes applicants for a Visitor (subclass 600) visa. As such, each person who has parental responsibility for a child will need to provide consent for a Visitor visa.

Do you require further assistance?

If you need assistance including your child in your visa application or have any other immigration related queries, get in touch with our experienced team. Contact us by email at  [email protected]  or by phone at +61 3 9016 0484.

This document does not constitute legal advice or create an attorney-client relationship. Please consult an immigration professional for up to date information.

Previous post how do i apply for asylum in australia the protection (subclass 866) visa, next post how do i apply for the australian entrepreneur visa - business innovation and investment (provisional) subclass 188 visa (entrepreneur stream).

Emily Young

Author Emily Young

Emily completed her Bachelor of Laws (Honours) from Bond University in 2019, and is busy building her legal knowledge across the entire Australian immigration law framework. She's passionate about global mobility and social issues, having previously worked on matters regarding international parental child abduction, volunteered for Camp Quality, and even set foot in North Korea!

Join the discussion 26 Comments

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Hi , I am in Australia student visa . Both my husband and I have visa of Australia. I have applied visa of our 3 yrs old daughter . Visa is yet to come. My husband has gone to our home country to bring here Australia if visa granted. Should we both fill 1229 form ?

And under Child Custody Details , do I need to click yes in is this child in the primary applicant’s care and legal custody ?

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Hi Sharmila, If both you and your husband were granted visas together then usually you would not need a Form 1229 (your marriage certificates and the child’s birth certificate shoudl be sufficient). There’s no harm in you adding a Form 1229 in any case. Good luck, Hannan Tew

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I am starting the visa process with my 14year old daughter. She had not had any contact with her father in Iver 10 years. We are not even sure where he is. Do I need to still complete the 1229 for her to be accepted for residency

Hi Kath, You may require a Statutory Declaration explaining the circumstances, along with any custody documentation. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi admin, I would like to ask that at what stage of the Visa application processing would the DHA request for the form 1229 for applicants under 18 years. Thanks.

Hi Olubunmi, If you believe it’s required, you should provide it at lodgement to avoid delays. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I have completed form 1229 as the parent with parental responsibility of daughter aged 16 years. I am the only parent on the birth certificate, myself and the biological father were never married, evidence requested now to prove sole custody but I thought that the birth certificate showing me as having parental responsibility would be all that was required as a single parent travelling with daughter and step family members including current partner, I’m a little confused as to how best to prove sole custody as the birth certificate showing me as named parent has already been provided , any advice much appreciated?

Hi Joann, Department policy about this is that a birth certificate is not necessarily initself sufficient: “The mere fact (or claim) that a non-custodial parent has had no contact with the child for a long time (or cannot be located) does not negate that person’s rights with regard to the child and officers cannot assume that this person consents to the grant of a visa. In such cases, PIC 4017 cannot be met and the the family head will need to: obtain a court order permitting removal of the child, provide other evidence that the laws of the child’s home country permits removal of the child or provide an Australian child order.” Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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Hi, I had been a single mother in S. Korea. I married my current husband who is an Australian citizen this year and have applied for visas for my 7 year old son and I. I have sole custodial and parental rights over my son and have been able to lawfully travel around without his birthfather’s consent but the Australian government has requested the form 1229 after our visa application. I have sent the legal documents to say I have both the custodial and parental rights. I wonder if this will be accepted or whether I will still need the form 1229 and if there is any other way I can stay here with my son because my exhusband is not someone who will be willing to help me in any way and has not even been paying the monthly fees he is lawfully required to pay me for my sole parentage. Please help me with advice. Thank uou so much.

Hi Jo-Ann, A Form 1229 is not the only document that can show custody, so you might consider other legal documentation to pass the relevant public interest criterion (e.g. a court order). Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss this further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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My ex-wife married an Australian and was issued a subclass 600 visa in October 2022. Our daughter’s application was rejected because I have joint custody and refused to give consent. Following this, my ex-wife applied for sole custody and the Malaysian court refused to award her sole custody, but decided to permit my daughter to move to Australia with her mother. I still have joint custody, but they are, apparently, reapplying using the approval from the Malaysian court. I have made two reports to Australian Border force, one before we went to court and again to update them on the court’s decision. Last week my daughter went to give her biometrics. Does this mean her visa is being approved? Or is there still hope that it will be declined? Thank you for reading and any advice is appreciated.

Hi there, PIC 4017 can be satisfied as long as the law of the applicant’s home country permits the removal of the applicant (even if joint custody exists). At first glance, it seems like your daughter will be able to obtain her Australian visa, but feel free to reach out at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I withdrew my wife’s 309 sponsorship due to my mother who was always instigating me & have been married for 17years. We are now a happy family when I decided to separate my wife from our own family life. My son is an Australian citizen & I am. Permanent resident my son is going to an international school in Malaysia and lives with my wife as I travel for work at times overseas. We have decided to relocate to Melbourne & I have made arrangements for him to enrol to a local council and I also have a resident property. Is it possible for my wife to get a visitors visa to accompany as her 309 was refused as I withdrew the sponsor at that time.

Hi Daljit, Your wife’s 309 visa refusal may make it challenging to address GTI criteria for the Visitor visa, so you would want to prepare a detailed statutory declaration explaining the separation. She’ll also now need to clearly demonstrate ties to Malaysia. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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I am an international from Sri Lanka living in Queensland, AU. I have recently applied for a new student visa as the old one is going to expire in March 2024. I included my child as a dependent. I have been living with my child and separately from my partner since 2022 due to domestic violence. A domestic violence protection order has been placed by the Brisbane Magistrate Court which is valid till 2027. I have had no contact with my child’s father after the incident and he went away from us and lives in Sri Lanka. He never took any action from his end to share the parental responsibility after the court order was placed. All responsibilities were on me as my child was 3 years old at that time. Since then, I have been looking after him, and demanding nothing from my child’s father. Also, have no further court order stating the child’s custody. I stated all these in a statement of letter and applied along with the protection order. However, now, I am required to give the consent of the child’s father for issuing a visa to my child. As long as there is no response from the child’s father, what may be the alternative to show evidence that my child is living with me and his father never cared about his child and just ran away to secure himself from legal penalties? I feel this may impact future visa applications as well. Therefore, I would like to get advice from you.

Hi Laavanya, If you are unable to obtain consent from your ex-husband, you may need to obtain a court order appointing sole responsibility for your child. We recommend speaking to a family lawyer about the best way to do this. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

' src=

Hi admin, I am assisting my brother who is an Australian citizen living in China with his daughter’s application for citizenship. Both parents are also moving to Australia but the daughter may arrive before the parents for a period of time, would a form 1229 be required?

Hi David, The Form 1229 is only required for visa applications (not citizenship applications). Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

' src=

I am applying a visitor visa for my sister, and brother-in-law and their children under 18, and they are asking for form 1229, my question do any of the parent need to sign the form or just children information is enough because they all travelling together and which document we need to attach along with it ?

Hi Tarun, If the family are travelling together usually the Form 1229 would not be requested, but if it has, both parents should sign the documents. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

' src=

My wife and I have just graduated from uni. We have two children and we both on shore at the moment. Both of our students visa have expired. My wife and one child applied for vistor visa and still processing. I want to apply for 485 visa and inculded both children although one has previously lodged Vistor visa application with my wife and the application as i mentioned is still processing.

My questions are as follow:

Can I include the child who already lodged an application in my own application for the 485 even though his application is still not processed?

Can I ask for a refund for the vistor visa application of my child lodged already?

Should I include my wife as a non accompanying member of family unit if she is not going to be included in the application? We both are in Australia but she is going for visitor visa so she doesn’t want to be included in my 485 visa application?

We are all on bridging visa as of now.

Hi Justin, Thanks for reaching out. These questions can be complex so will require a consultation to answer – feel free to email us at [email protected] to arrange. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

' src=

Hello, I am applying for a 482 visa and my wife and 2 children (one and a half years old ) are accompanying members of the family unit and are included in the nomination form. I will be moving to Australia first and my wife and kids will join me later. My queries are Under the child custodial detail section in Form 482 : 1. Is this child in the primary applicant’s care and legal custody? Y/ N ? 2. Does any other person have custodial, access or guardianship rights to this child? Y/N ? if yes , do i have to provide my wife’s detail 3. Are there any legal impediments to this child’s travel? Y/ N 4. do I need to fill out form 1229? Thank you in advance awaiting ur reply

Hi Harshwardhan, If both you and the child’s mother are included in the visa application, you are unlikely to require a Form 1229. Feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss further. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

' src=

Hi there, i recently got a 190visa application and have started it. I’m divorced and are living in Australia with my two kids. My ex is in the UK and has signed the form 1229 as consent. We have a mutual agreement that I live with the children and they go see their dad when they can. There are no court orders available so my question is does my ex need to provide more evidence for me having custody of the kids like writing a letter. And what kind of a letter should be written if needed. Thank you

Hi Lorraine, Broadly speaking the Form 1229 signed by your partners should be sufficient, but feel free to contact us at [email protected] if you’d like to discuss in more detail. Kind regards, Hannan Tew

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International students under the age of 18 on arrival in Australia must have approved accommodation and welfare arrangements in place before a student visa can be issued. These arrangements are regulated by the Australian Department of Home Affairs (DHA), as per Standard 5 (Younger Overseas Students) of the  National Code 2018 , to ensure student safety and wellbeing.

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Curtin University’s approved welfare services provider is  ISA Student Advocates . ISA specialises in providing support, security and advocacy services to international students during their study time in Australia. They have over 20 years’ experience working with international students and education providers across Australia.

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Pre-departure checklist.

This pre-departure checklist will help you prepare for your travels to Australia. 

1. Passport

Check that your passport is valid for at least six months prior to your arrival in Australia. It is also a good idea to make a copy of your passport and leave it with a family member in case of an emergency.

Make sure you have a valid visa for entering and studying in Australia well before your departure date and that you have all your visa documentation (including Confirmation of Enrolment, or eCoE) with you on your flight.

Be sure to book your flight to arrive in Australia with plenty of time to settle into your new city and campus before your course starts. Only book your flight once you have been granted a student visa.

Check out our helpful tips for booking your flight to Australia.

4. Travel insurance

In addition to your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC), you should also consider travel insurance, which covers things such as cancelled flights and some medical costs. Talk to your education or travel agent for more information and for advice on the best travel insurance policy for you.

It is recommended that you have some Australian currency with you when you land in Australia. There are money exchange counters in most international airports and cities. 

Ask your bank if you can withdraw money from ATMs (cash withdrawal machines) in Australia. If so, find out whether you need to pay a fee each time, and how much, so that you can plan your withdrawals.  

You may wish to open an account with an Australian bank to save on fees. Some banks will let you apply to open an account even before you arrive.

6. Accommodation

You will be required to provide your accommodation address on your incoming passenger card when you arrive in Australia. This means you need to arrange accommodation for your first night(s) before you travel. 

Please note: If you are under 18 years of age, it is a student visa requirement that you have adequate welfare arrangements in place prior to your arrival.

7. Arrange transport to your accommodation

Before you travel to Australia, find out how to get to your accommodation from your arrival airport or train/bus station, and how to check into your accommodation – including outside of usual business hours in case you arrive late at night or early in the morning.

8. Packing your bag

Research the average temperatures of your location in Australia so you will know whether to pack clothes that suit hot or cold weather. It's also a good idea to pack a travel adaptor that connects to Australian power points. 

Make sure you check your airline’s luggage allowance. Some airlines have the option to buy additional baggage online, which is cheaper than paying for an overweight or additional bag at airport check-in.

9. Hand luggage

It's a good idea to pack a change of clothes, a toothbrush, toothpaste, and deodorant to freshen up or in case of any delays with your main luggage. Remember that liquid, aerosol, and gel items must be in containers of 100 millilitres or less. 

Other things to pack in your hand luggage include:

  • your passport and visa documentation
  • the address of your accommodation
  • a pen to fill out the incoming passenger card
  • any prescription medication, and
  • a list of emergency contact details including a family member, your education provider and education agent (if you have one).

10. What to expect on arrival

When you arrive at an Australian airport, you will first need to go through immigration and customs. You will need to complete an incoming passenger card which is usually given to you on board your flight.

Further information on what to expect at border clearance can be found on the Australian Border Force website .

11. Check travel and border requirements

You are not required to:

  • show proof of your COVID-19 vaccination for travel to Australia, or
  • have a COVID-19 test before travel.

However, you should check the requirements of your airline and any countries that you are transiting through as they may have vaccination or COVID-19 pre-testing requirements. 

You can stay up to date with latest travel requirements by visiting the Department of Home Affairs website.

12. What you can (and can't) bring into Australia

Australia has strict border controls so you need to be aware of what you can and cannot bring into Australia.

Australia's biosecurity laws have been strengthened and penalties will apply if you fail to truthfully declare biosecurity goods at the Australian border. Find out what you can and can’t bring on the Australian Border Force website.

13. Planning to work?

Your student visa allows you to work alongside your studies. This can help you to earn some extra spending money, and help you gain valuable language and cultural experience. Find out what you need to know about working in Australia as an international student.

14. Have fun!

After you’ve arrived and have finished settling into your new home and surrounds, your Study Australia adventure begins.

You're now part of a cohort that make an immense contribution to Australian society. Australia is now home to incredible citizens who started out as international students.

Welcome to our community, we are glad you can join us.

Need more help?

Life in Australia

Accommodation

Australia has a wide range of short-term rental, on campus and homestay accommodation options for students.

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Plan your move

Your first week in Australia

Handy tips to help you settle into your new life in Australia as an international student.

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Welcome to Australia! We're here to help you get involved and make the most of student life.

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International students under 18 years of age

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Welfare requirements for international students under 18 years of age.

If you are an international student under 18 years old, you must have welfare arrangements in place to apply for your student visa. This is to ensure that you are living in a secure environment with adequate practical and emotional support to keep you safe before you turn 18. 

There are two options for welfare arrangements that the  Department of Home Affairs  consider appropriate for an under-18 student studying in Australia. 

You will be living with an approved relative who lives in Australia, or an approved relative will travel to Australia and live with you.

Option 2:  You will not be staying with a relative, so RMIT can approve your welfare arrangements and issue a CAAW (Confirmation of Appropriate Accommodation and Welfare). RMIT provides welfare by ensuring that you use the services of an approved caregiver and ensuring you live in an RMIT approved accommodation option.

Note:  The airport pickup service is compulsory for students under Option 2. All U18 arrival details must be provided in advance to confirm this service.

By issuing the CAAW, RMIT University is accepting responsibility for your welfare arrangement.

A Confirmation of Appropriate Accommodation and Welfare letter (RMIT approved welfare arrangements) is only available to Under 18 students on or intending to apply for a Subclass 500 Student Visa. RMIT will not accept welfare responsibility for U18 students on any other visa type.

Approval of a CAAW

For approval of a CAAW, you need:

  • A caregiver + arrange to live in an approved accommodation. 

Applying for a student visa

To apply for a student visa you need:

  • Option 1: Confirmation of enrolment (CoE) + Form 157N
  • Option 2: Confirmation of enrolment (CoE) + CAAW

If you select Option 2, you must be issued with a CAAW letter before you can arrive in Australia. Find out the earliest possible date for your arrival.

Advise us of your welfare option

When you accept your offer, you need to submit the Under-18 Welfare Approval Form to let us know which welfare option you have chosen. After your form has been assessed, your CoE can be issued.

Welfare Approval Process

Option 1 - staying with a relative.

  • Accept your offer to RMIT.  Find out how to accept your offer .

Option 2 - Applying for RMIT Welfare

Before you begin, you will need:

  • A confirmation from your caregiver (.pdf or email screenshot)
  • A confirmation from your accommodation (.pdf or email screenshot)
  • Parent’s signed photo ID
  • A copy of your passport photo page

Steps to apply:

  • Accept your offer  to RMIT. 
  • Choose your caregiver company and confirm directly with them.
  • Choose your accommodation provider and confirm directly with them.
  • Submit completed Under 18 Welfare Approval Form .
  • Your request will be assessed, and you will be notified of the outcome via email
  • When your arrangements are approved, your CoE (and CAAW) will be issued, and you can apply for a student visa with these documents.
  • Book your compulsory airport pickup.

If you are travelling to Australia with your parents, please complete the  Temporary Welfare Waive (Offshore) .

If the parent or guardian does not have a passport

If a parent does not have a passport, an alternative photo ID card can be used.

Parent signs a photocopy of valid photo ID 

Agent certifies the copy:  “Signature witnessed by (staff member name & agency name) on dd/mm/yyyydate.”

Include a scan of the verified document in the Welfare Approval Form. 

The name on the verified ID must match the parent's name on the Welfare Approval Form.

If the parent is not working with an agent, a public notary must certify the document.

Certified passport

If you need to change your arrangements after they have been approved, you must obtain approval from RMIT before the change happens.

For help with welfare arrangements and general enquiries for under-18 arrangements, contact:

Under 18 International Welfare team

Email:  [email protected]

Accommodation options

Pbsa (purpose built student accommodation).

PBSA buildings are specially designed and built accommodation sites which cater to the needs of students. PBSA options are typically located close to universities and offer a range of room types and shared communal areas.

A homestay is a local family, couple or single person offering full board in their home. A homestay experience can be a great way to adjust to life in Melbourne and form relationships with a local family. 

RMIT has approved  Australian Homestay Network (AHN)  as the homestay provider for under-18 overseas students. Homestay accommodation is subject to availability and may not be available to all students.

If you are an international student aged under 18, you must have a caregiver who will support you until you turn 18.

Your caregiver will meet with you at least every fortnight and can help you find medical or other support services in Melbourne, change your accommodation, act as your emergency contact.

For the list of approved caregiver companies that specialise in supporting RMIT international students aged under 18, see our list of approved accommodation and caregiver providers. 

Airport pick-up request for under 18 students

When to apply.

Airport pick-up requests can be submitted up to one month before your scheduled arrival date .

Important note

Conditions of caaw & maintaining rmit caaw letter, rmit curfew.

While you are under-18 and under the RMIT CAAW letter, you must return to your approved accommodation each night by 10pm. Students in PBSA accommodation are required to sign the curfew register. The accommodation provider will contact RMIT & the caregiver if you do not return home by 10pm. Approval must be sought from RMIT for late curfew approval via the Curfew Extension Request form.

How to maintain your CAAW letter

To maintain your CAAW letter, you must:

  • Maintain the caregiver and accommodation arrangements approved 
  • Stay at your approved accommodation every night 
  • Seek approval from RMIT before taking holidays or making a change to accommodation 
  • Follow the nightly curfew of 10pm 
  • Not buy, consume or possess alcohol 
  • Not buy, consume or possess drugs 
  • Follow all ‘house rules’ in your approved accommodation as agreed in the tenancy agreement or equivalent document 
  • Pay your accommodation fees on time.

CAAW withdrawal process

If you are unable to meet the requirements to maintain your CAAW you will be issued three written warnings: 

  • First Warning via email 
  • Second Warning and required face to face meeting
  • Third Warning (final) and required face to face meeting. 

If you continue to breach the requirements of the CAAW after the Third Warning - you will be issued a CAAW Cancellation Notice. Your parent(s) and caregiver will be included in each of these communications.

If your CAAW letter is cancelled, your parent will need to make arrangements to maintain your welfare while you are under-18. 

RMIT will notify the Department of Home Affairs if your CAAW letter is cancelled.

Forms for under 18 international students

Welfare approval form.

Must be provided to RMIT to nominate where you will be staying and who your caregiver or guardian will be while you are in Australia.

Temporary Welfare Waive Form – Onshore

Allows a student currently in Australia to remain with a parent and/or relative, instead of approved long-term accommodation for a set period.

Temporary Welfare Waive Form – Offshore pre-arrival

Allows a student currently outside Australia to remain with a visiting parent(s) instead of approved long-term accommodation for a set period when they arrive in Australia.

Change of Accommodation Request Form

Must be provided to RMIT to nominate a change in approved accommodation.

Holiday Request Form

Must be provided to RMIT to request a holiday/visit to home country during semester breaks.

Curfew Extension Request Form

Use this form to apply for an extension to your curfew, up to 1am.

Please note: the above requests are subject to RMIT approval.

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RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business - Artwork 'Luwaytini' by Mark Cleaver, Palawa.

RMIT University acknowledges the people of the Woi wurrung and Boon wurrung language groups of the eastern Kulin Nation on whose unceded lands we conduct the business of the University. RMIT University respectfully acknowledges their Ancestors and Elders, past and present. RMIT also acknowledges the Traditional Custodians and their Ancestors of the lands and waters across Australia where we conduct our business.

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Travelling to Australia with children on an ETA or eVisitor visa

travel australia children eta evisitor

Anyone wishing to enter Australian territory needs to apply for and obtain a visa prior to departure. If you decide to travel to Australia and you’re not an Australian passport holder, you will need to get a visa for yourself and your family.

Many parents may wonder whether their children can be added to their visa or if they will need to apply for a separate travel authorisation. This article will explain how to travel to Australia with kids so that you will go through passport control hassle-free.

Do children need a visa for Australia?

All foreigners, regardless of their age, must hold a valid visa to enter the country. The type of Australian visa that you and your children will need to apply for will depend on your specific circumstances, nationality, and travel plans.

If you are visiting Australia for tourism short-term, the quickest and easiest visas you may be able to apply for are the Electronic Travel Authorisation (ETA) and the eVisitor visa.

At the border , each foreigner will need to present a printed copy of their visa to the border control officers together with the passport they used during the application and the Incoming Passenger Card they will have been provided with during travel.

Australian visas for minors: the ETA

The Australian ETA is an electronic permission to travel. This means that you won’t need to visit an Australian embassy or consulate and will be able to apply for your travel authorisation completely online .

As long as you have access to a reliable internet connection and keep your supporting documents at hand, you should be able to complete the ETA application in minutes.

Unless they hold an Australian passport, your children will need to apply for a separate ETA . Each minor will have to submit an individual ETA application and all applicants need to meet the visa requirements for Australia .

  • Minor has their own passport : Help your child complete their separate ETA application and enter their passport details.
  • Minor is on a parent’s passport :Help your child complete their individual ETA application. Enter your passport details — or the details of the passport where the minor is featured — but use the minor’s personal information (name, date of birth, country of birth) as they appear on the passport.

How can minors apply for the eVisitor visa for Australia?

The ETA travel authorisation and eVisitor visa for Australia are very similar in their requirements and application process. Again, the eVisitor application can be completed entirely online from anywhere in the world . You’ll only need your passport, a valid email address, the application fee, and relevant supporting documents.

All travellers need to submit a separate eVisitor application if they wish to travel to Australia with this visa. Therefore, all your children must complete an individual application.

The steps to complete an eVisitor application for a minor are the same as the ETA steps mentioned above.

Can I sponsor my child’s trip to Australia?

Please note that it’s not possible to sponsor family members on short-term visas like the ETA and eVisitor visas. As mentioned before, each family member must obtain their own travel permit.

However, in many cases, it’s possible for parents on permanent visas to sponsor their children for migration purposes to Australia. This is not an automatic process and there’s no guarantee that the application will be granted.

Besides meeting all the legal requirements for migration to Australia, the child must be:

  • Natural, adopted, or stepchild of an Australian citizen or of the holder of an Australian permanent visa, or an eligible New Zealand citizen
  • Dependant on the sponsor. This means that the child must depend completely or in great part on the sponsor for financial support
  • Under 25 years of age when the application is submitted. If the child is over 18, they must also be a full-time student and financially dependent on the sponsor
  • Unmarried, not engaged, and not in a de-facto relationship

When travelling to Australia with children, you should also ensure that you are up-to-date with any additional requirements.

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What is a Child Travel Consent and Do I Need One?

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By Lachlan McKnight CEO

Updated on December 8, 2021 Reading time: 5 minutes

This article meets our strict editorial principles. Our lawyers, experienced writers and legally trained editorial team put every effort into ensuring the information published on our website is accurate. We encourage you to seek independent legal advice. Learn more .

Travel Consent by Sole Guardian

Travel consent from two guardians, travel consent with one legal guardian who does not have sole custody.

A child travel consent is a document that shows authorities and foreign officials that a minor (e.g. a child under the age of 18 years) has permission from all legal guardians/custodians to travel. It may be required in the following circumstances:

  • where a child is travelling with an adult who is not the sole parent/guardian of the child;
  • where a child is travelling with an organisation or group and the sole parent/guardian is not part of the group;
  • where the child is travelling alone.

It is particularly important when a child is travelling overseas and communication with their parent(s)/guardian(s) may be difficult. The Australian Government , in particular, advises people travelling with children to carry a child consent to travel with them.

If a child is travelling with one parent/guardian who has sole custody then it is advisable that the parent/guardian takes a notarized or certified true copy of a court order or death certificate proving sole custody, just in case any problems are encountered along the way (particularly in foreign airports).

Please note that some countries (e.g. Brazil) require specific travel consent forms for children. If you are travelling outside Australia you may wish to contact the consulate of your destination country prior to embarking on your overseas travel to ensure you have the necessary documentation. This should be arranged well in advance in order to minimise the risk that the relevant paperwork is not completed in time. If you have arranged your booking through a travel agent then do not rely on them to tell you what you need to do.  You should make your own inquiries.

This is to be used where the child only has one guardian (because, for example, the other legal guardian has died or the family court has ordered that only one parent is to be the child’s legal guardian, in which case only one signature is required) and the child is not travelling with that guardian.

This is to be used in situations where a child has two guardians, neither guardian is travelling with the child and the consent of both those guardians is required for the child to travel, in which case both signatures are required.

This is to be used if the child is travelling with only one of his or her guardians and the consent of the other guardian is required, in which case the signature of the guardian who is not travelling with the child is required.

Please note that LegalVision is a commercial law firm and unfortunately cannot assist with child consent enquiries. We recommend you contact SmartTraveller.gov.au .

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Unaccompanied minor waiting at airport

Unaccompanied minors

We offer a service to help young flyers travelling alone on Qantas operated flights. Your child is our priority, and we'll assist them once checked in, and ensure they're escorted to the pick-up person at their final destination.

Travelling as an Unaccompanied Minor

If you're booking flights for a child under the age of 12, they must be accompanied by a guardian who is aged 15 years or older, travelling on an adult fare. If the child is travelling alone, they must be registered as an Unaccompanied Minor.

Find out how to register an unaccompanied minor.

Important: If your child is travelling with a passenger aged between 12 and 14 (inclusive), this passenger is not a suitable guardian (even if an adult fare is booked) therefore the child must still be registered as an Unaccompanied Minor. Jetstar doesn't offer an Unaccompanied Minor service. 

At Qantas, we consider a child under 12 years to be an Unaccompanied Minor if the child is travelling without the supervision of, or travelling in a separate cabin to:

  • a parent or guardian,
  • a sibling aged 15 years or older, or
  • an adult nominated by the child's parent or guardian.

If your child requires special assistance or needs specific care, they must be accompanied by a fare paying guardian or carer who is aged 15 years or older. For more information on the other services we offer passengers, including travelling with reduced mobility, visit  Travelling with specific needs .

If your child is between 12 and 17 years of age, you may wish to request they travel as a Young Passenger. See Young passengers travelling alone below for more information.

Travel on Jetstar

Jetstar doesn't offer an Unaccompanied Minor service. For further information on young passengers travelling alone on a Jetstar flight, visit the  Jetstar  website.

Eligibility

To be eligible to travel as an Unaccompanied Minor, certain age and other requirements apply.

Age requirements

  • Flight times don't include any time in transit or when transferring to a connecting flight.

Requirements

Children travelling alone need to be able to:

  • eat and drink without assistance, where we can assist with opening packaging where necessary, 
  • attend the toilet independently, and
  • administer their own prescribed medication - see travelling with medication below for more information. 

We don’t accept children travelling alone as an Unaccompanied Minor when their trip includes:

  • connecting flights departing from a different terminal,
  • a transit time between any two connecting flights that is more than four (4] hours,
  • the last flight of the day from the final connection city (unless it's the only flight), and
  • overnight connecting flights.

If your child isn’t booked as an Unaccompanied Minor where required, they may not be accepted to travel alone and may be denied boarding at the airport.

An Unaccompanied Minor fee is payable for each travel sector, and applies to Qantas operated flights only.* This fee is in addition to your child’s ticket.

Fees for booking an Unaccompanied Minor on/before 17 April 2024

Fees for booking an Unaccompanied Minor on/after 18 April 2024

Disclaimer: * The Unaccompanied Minor fee doesn't apply for travel on QantasLink flights to and from Longreach, Barcaldine and Blackall.

How to calculate the fee:

Where an Unaccompanied Minor is travelling from Sydney to Denpasar, with a transfer in Melbourne, and the service is booked in advance:

  • The total fee will be A$90 if both sectors are booked in one booking. 
  • If the Sydney to Melbourne flight is booked on a separate booking to the Melbourne to Denpasar flight, or Melbourne is a stopover exceeding 24 hours the fee will be A$145.

Australian domestic flights can be made online , or by contacting your local Qantas office or travel agent:

  • This requires you to register the child as an Unaccompanied Minor. Book online with no adults on the ticket - the Unaccompanied Minor form will be sent to your email attached with eticket receipt
  • Book two tickets online, one as an adult passenger and one as a child passenger - once booked, contact your local Qantas office  with your booking reference to register the child aged 5-11 as an Unaccompanied Minor as children must travel with a guardian aged 15 years or older.
  • Book online and no notice is required. Ensure you book two tickets online, one as an adult passenger (the guardian aged 15 and over) and one as a child passenger.

For international flights or Qantas Australian domestic flights that depart from an international terminal (flights QF1-399), contact your  local Qantas office or travel agent for bookings.

Young passengers travelling alone

Travelling as a Young Passenger is an additional option available for children travelling alone who are aged between 12 and 17 years.

No additional assistance is provided except in the event of a flight disruption. If the booked flight is cancelled, our team will provide support. We’ll do our best to accommodate the Young Passenger onto another flight to their destination and if that's not possible, we’ll:

  • provide regular updates to the parent/guardian,
  • coordinate supervision including accommodation and transfers, and
  • provide food and beverages.

If your child is aged between 12 and 17 years and comfortable travelling alone, you can request they're identified as a Young Passenger travelling alone by calling your local Qantas office or your travel agent.

Booking a young passenger

If your child is aged between 12 and 17 years and comfortable travelling alone, you can make their booking online , or by contacting your local Qantas office or travel agent.

You'll need to contact your local Qantas office or your travel agent to request they're identified as a Young Passenger travelling alone.

Before travel

Children with luggage

Getting ready

Whether your child has travelled alone before or this is their first time, we recommend talking with them about the trip and what to expect.

Let them know that the Qantas team is here to help keep them safe.

Unaccompanied Minor travel form

Before your child can fly with us, and for safety and security requirements, a legal parent or guardian must complete and sign a Qantas Unaccompanied Minor travel form.

Complete the form online, then print it and bring a signed copy to the airport to present at check-in. The details on the form must match the details recorded in the booking, and we’ll confirm this information with you at the airport. 

Note: If you're unsure how to complete the form, view the example  to ensure you have entered the right information.

Completing the form on a tablet or mobile

To complete the form, first you'll need to save it in your files folder. Once you've done that, open the form to make the updates.

Before departing for the airport, make sure you have: 

  • a valid form of identification for the person taking your child to the airport,
  • a separate Unaccompanied Minor form for each sector of the trip; all forms need to be signed by the parent or guardian as well as the people bringing and picking up your child at the airport,
  • one or two of their favourite things in their carry-on luggage; all heavy and unnecessary items should be placed in their checked baggage, and
  • their passport if they're travelling internationally.

Valid forms of identification include:

One (1) form of acceptable photo ID is required for verification of the identity of person dropping off and person picking up. Acceptable forms of photo ID are:

  • a valid national passport,
  • a valid motor vehicle Driver’s Licence issued under a law of the Commonwealth of Australia, or of a State or Territory of Australia,
  • a current document issued by the Commonwealth of Australia, or an Australian State or Territory, or by an authority of the Commonwealth of Australia, or a State or Territory of Australia, that identifies the person,
  • a current Aviation Security Identity Card issued by the operator of the aircraft, or the operator of an airport in Australia, and 
  • current university photo identification card,
  • current TAFE identity card, and 
  • current APEC card – Australian issued only.

Where the parent or guardian, or pick up/drop off person does not have access to photo ID due to specific state limitations, two (2) forms of acceptable non-photo ID are required for verification of identity of the person. Acceptable forms of non-photo ID are:

  • Australian Medicare card,
  • debit or credit card,
  • Government issued card;
  • library card; and
  • Qantas Frequent Flyer membership card.

Travel documents

Some countries have additional documentation requirements for children travelling into and out of the country. See travel documents  for more information.

Travelling with medication

Unaccompanied Minors must be capable of self-administering their medication to travel alone. Medication includes any medicine prescribed by a doctor or dentist, or over the counter from a supermarket or pharmacy. Examples of over-the-counter medication may include antihistamines, hydrocortisone creams/ointments, painkillers such as Panadol, auto-injectors and inhalers.

Your child must:

  • be capable of identifying the need for the medication, 
  • be capable of self-administering their medication, and 
  • carry a letter or medical certificate from their doctor stating the medication needs. This document must be less than two years old and must be written in English.

If your child needs to travel with medication, you’ll need to:

  • notify us at the time of booking, and
  • advise us of any allergies or any special requirements.

If your child becomes ill while in our care and alternative arrangements need to be made, the parent or guardian or responsible adult identified on the Unaccompanied Minor travel form is solely responsible for making such arrangements.

Dietary requirements, special meals and snacks

If your child has special dietary requirements, or you'd like to book a child’s meal, you can request one at least 24 hours before your first flight via Manage booking or by calling your local Qantas office . Although special meals must be requested 24 hours before travel, we’re unable to guarantee availability, and we recommend that you pack a small snack in your child's carry-on baggage.

You’ll need to ensure you're familiar with the Australian Border Force regulations and limits on what you can take onboard. When travelling internationally, or on an Australian domestic sector of an international flight, you’re not permitted liquids, pastes or gels that are more than 1OOmls. 

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Contact information

The 'Main Contact' nominated by the Parent, Guardian or Responsible Adult noted on the Unaccompanied Minor travel form must be available by telephone at any time without delay while your child is in our care.

If the nominated pickup person doesn't meet your child on arrival at the gate for Australian domestic flights, or at the designated area for international flights, and we cannot contact the Main Contact, we may take any action we deem appropriate including contacting the Police for the safety and welfare of your child.

Day of travel

Girl boarding aircraft

Check-in for children travelling alone is available at Special Assistance counters. The team will check your photo identification and contact details for the adult collecting the child, which should match all the details in the online booking. Ensure your child carries paper copies of any travel documentation.

Make sure you arrive nice and early for your flight:

  • one-hour before departure for Australian domestic flights, and 
  • two hours before departure for international flights.

Online check-in and pre-selecting seats aren’t available for children travelling alone.

Saying goodbye to family and friends

Children travelling alone are subject to the same security and quarantine procedures as other customers.

The person escorting your child for an Australian domestic flight must escort them to the boarding gate. The Qantas team will then escort your child from the gate to the aircraft. For an international flight, we'll escort your child through security and to the departure gate, where the onboard Cabin Crew will assist.

Note:  

  • If your child is travelling alone in Business, they’re not eligible to access the Qantas Lounge.
  • The person escorting your child to the airport must remain at the airport until the flight has departed and is in the air.

Care inflight

We’ll endeavour to seat Unaccompanied Minors together near Cabin Crew work areas. Young flyers will always board the aircraft with Cabin Crew, after the main customer flow. Our team will help them stow their hand luggage, provide a safety briefing and make them comfortable. Food and beverages are available on most flights. During the flight, we’ll regularly check on your child.

Connecting flights

If your child has a connecting flight, they’ll be supervised at the airport by the Qantas team and escorted to the next flight provided:

  • your child isn’t booked on connecting flights with a transit time of more than four hours, and
  • the next flight is operated by Qantas and departing from the same terminal. 

Transferring to another airline

If your child needs to connect to a flight operated by another airline, you'll need to book directly with that airline, and check with them about their individual requirements. Many airlines either don't offer an unaccompanied minor service, or have specific criteria and age requirements that may be different.

We're not able to transfer your child to another airline or between terminals, and alternative arrangements will need to be made.

On arrival at their destination, your child will be escorted to the arrivals area by our team. If travelling internationally, we’ll help them through Customs and Immigration, and with their baggage.

In the arrivals area, our team will take your child to the nominated pick-up person. This person must be aged 18 years or older, or a sibling aged 15 years or older. Valid identification is required from the person collecting your child and must be identical to the name on the Unaccompanied Minor travel form.

Booking changes

unaccompanied minor

Changing your child's booking

If you need to make any changes to your booking, including updating the contact details of the person dropping or collecting your child, contact your local Qantas office .

We’ll only accept changes to Unaccompanied Minor bookings by:

  • the Main Contact, 
  • a parent or guardian, 
  • a travel agent or person acting on behalf of any of the above, or 
  • Qantas airport customer service staff in the event of a disruption.

Flight disruptions

If your child's flight is delayed or cancelled, we'll be in touch with the Main Contact, as provided on the Unaccompanied Minor travel form.

The Main Contact is then required to advise the pickup person of this delay or make alternative arrangements if required. In the event of a flight cancellation, they must notify the parent or guardian where to meet to pick up their child.

Real time information and any changes can be sent to your phone. Simply download the Qantas App and add the flight number from the booking, or register your email or phone number at Flight Status .

Travel requirements

unaccompanied minor

Some countries have additional documentation requirements for children travelling into and out of the country, such as the United States and South Africa. This documentation may vary, and you’ll need to check with the relevant government authorities to make sure you have everything you need before arriving at the airport.

It’s the parent or guardian's responsibility to manage any entry requirements for your child's destination and any transit cities, and ensure your child carries paper copies of any travel documentation required for their destination, including any visas and proof of identity. 

Flights between Australia and the United States

If your child is travelling to or from the United States of America, the child's parent or guardian is required to drop them off at the nominated location within the airport and must always be contactable.

On arrival, we'll escort your child to the parent or guardian as nominated on the Unaccompanied Minor travel form.

Flights between Australia and South Africa

The Republic of South Africa Department of Home Affairs has outlined the conditions for children travelling unaccompanied and the documents they need to provide when entering and leaving the country.

For more information, visit the Republic of South Africa  Department of Home Affairs . This is information may change and recommend you check the website regularly for any updates.

Discover more about travelling with children

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Information for parents

Check out our tips on special meals, baggage, travelling with strollers and more.

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If you are a student visa holder who is under 18 and not accompanied by your parents, family or legal guardian, the University is responsible for your welfare, including your accommodation. There's some special rules and arrangements in place until you turn 18. These are to ensure that you stay safe and that everyone meets their legal obligations.

Find out about these arrangements and how we'll help you navigate this exciting new chapter in your life with confidence and ease.

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If you've received approval from the Department of Home Affairs to travel and live with parents or relatives in Australia, the University isn't responsible for your welfare conditions and the information on this page doesn't apply to you.

When to arrive in Australia

It is a condition of your visa that you must not enter Australia before your welfare arrangements are due to commence as nominated in your Confirmation of Appropriate Accommodation and Welfare (CAAW) letter.

If you will arrive in Australia before this, you must be accompanied by a legal guardian.

When you accepted your letter of offer, there were some conditions you agreed to. Now that you're in Australia, it's important you meet these conditions until you turn 18. Refer to your CAAW letter for more detail.

  • Accommodation Your approved accommodation is the only place that you are permitted to stay overnight unless you have prior written approval from the University. This is explained in the accommodation and welfare section below.
  • Updating your details You need to provide us with up-to-date information for your contact details and that of your parent, legal guardian or other responsible adult. Let us know if this information changes by logging in to Sydney Student and updating your details .
  • Staying in touch You should regularly communicate with your welfare provider through phone and face-to-face meetings.
  • Acting responsibly Be responsible for your behaviour and follow Australian laws. This includes sticking to curfews and avoiding getting involved in any illegal activities or risky behaviors.

There were also a few other things you acknowledged when you accepted your offer. These are that the University:

  • is not responsible for any fees or costs associated with your accommodation and welfare arrangements
  • is not legally responsible for your actions
  • has the right to withdraw approval for your accommodation, support, and welfare if you don't follow these conditions.

Your accommodation and welfare

The University has a list of approved welfare and accommodation providers that meet the high standards that are expected. Yours were arranged before applying for your student visa and the details are in your CAAW. Under the terms of your CAAW, you're required to reside at the address of your approved accommodation provider at all times.

It's very important you understand how your accommodation and welfare arrangements work, as you need to follow the rules in your CAAW and/or your student visa requirements. If you don't, you could be in breach of your visa. This could lead to a cancellation of your CAAW and potentially impact your visa status.

Social events and your curfew

If you'd like to attend a social event, you'll need to return to your approved accommodation by the curfew. The curfew is set by your accommodation provider and they may have a specific process for you to follow to check in by curfew each day. Please contact your accommodation provider for more information about your curfew.

You can't stay overnight somewhere else unless you have written approval from the University for a temporary absence .

Staying with your parents or guardian

Once your CAAW has commenced, if you'd like to stay with your parents or legal guardian at any stage in accommodation other than you approved accommodation, you'll need written approval from the University for a temporary absence .

This is the case, even if they accompany you to Sydney and you'd like to stay with them on your first night.

Changing your accommodation or welfare provider

If you want to change your accommodation or welfare provider, you can only do so if you have written approval from:

  • the University, and
  • your parent, guardian, or welfare provider.

The first step is to get in touch with us by sending an email to [email protected] . We'll get back to you with how we can help.

Temporary absence from approved accommodation

If you need to stay overnight at any other address, you need prior written approval from us. Otherwise you'll be in breach of your student visa requirements.

The University has strict legal obligations to under 18 students and there's a high level of risk involved in student absences. For these reasons, we'll only approve a request to be absent from approved accommodation in one of the following circumstances:

  • you're required to be absent to attend compulsory University activities
  • you're travelling back to your home country
  • you're travelling with your parent or approved temporary guardian.

Your welfare provider will need to apply on your behalf, so start by talking to them as soon as you can. Your provider will likely need your help to gather the necessary information and documents so that they can complete the application.

Information for welfare providers

If you're a welfare provider applying on behalf of a student for a temporary absence from accommodation, find information about the application process and log in to complete the application form .

More information and help

If you need help, please email [email protected] .

For more information, refer to:

  • Under 18 International Students Policy 2016
  • Under 18 International Students Procedures 2016

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There is scheduled system maintenance on the Online Passport Application Service (AusPassport) from  1:00am – 6:00am AEST Thursday 20 June 2024 . You can access your AusPassport account but may experience intermittent service interruptions during this time. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Child passport general information

How do i get a child passport, who counts as a child.

  • Do all parents have to consent?

Can a child go into a family passport?

Do children have to sign their passports, how long are child passports valid.

  • Why can't people under 18 complete passport applications online?
  • I'm under 18 and married. How do I complete a passport application?
  • I'm under 18 and live independently. How do I apply for a passport?

Our 5-step guide sets out what to do.

The Australian Passports Act 2005 defines a child as a person under 18 years of age who has never married.

Do all parents have to consent to a child passport?

Yes, in most cases. See our parental responsibility and consent page for more information.

No. All children, including babies, have to travel on their own passports.

Children aged 10 and over have to sign section 16 of the application form (section 18 if overseas), unless a medical condition prevents this. The signature goes in the passport.

For children aged under 10, a signature is optional.

Children aged 15 and under get five-year passports. Children aged 16 or 17 get 10-year passports.

Why can’t people under 18 have an Auspassport account to complete applications online?

Under the Electronic Transactions Act 1999 , we can only accept applications completed online by people aged 18 years and older.

I’m under 18 and have married. How do I apply for a passport?

If you’ve ever been married, use an adult passport application form from Australia Post and show us a marriage certificate issued by a government authority. You can’t complete your application online.

I’m under 18 and live independently. How do I apply for a passport?

If you’ve never married, you can use a child passport application form from Australia Post. Or you can ask someone aged 18 or over to go online and complete a child application for you.

In either case, you can lodge the form yourself. You’ll need to attach documents that show you live independently. Examples of documents we accept include evidence of employment, a Centrelink (Services Australia) health care card in your name, a receipt for rent in your name, evidence of Centrelink payments to you for living assistance or rental assistance, or other documents that show you’re self-supporting.

You’ll also need to show us some form of ID and evidence of your current address.

Unless your parents are deceased – or there’s an Australian court order that permits you to have an Australian passport, travel internationally or live or spend time with a person outside Australia – you’ll need to get consent from everyone with parental responsibility for you or make a claim under special circumstances .

  • Lodging a child passport application
  • Parental responsibility and consent
  • Intercountry adoption

Does a child need a visa to travel to Australia?

Do you want to travel to Australia with your child or does your child want to go alone? Whether it's a school trip or with a second parent or legal guardian? In this case, you should know that, just like an adult, he or she will need to carry a legal travel authorisation such as a visa or an evisitor or eTA.

travelling to australia under 18

In this article, we will explain why and how to obtain this type of travel authorisation for your minor child if they are travelling alone or with their family to Australia, as well as the other documents and authorisations required for their travel to Australia.

eTA or eVisitor child visa for Australia: key points The eVisitor or eTA visa is required for children of all ages. The application for an eVisitor or eTA visa for a child must be made by the child's parent or legal guardian Children travelling to Australia must have their own passport Other documents may be required for a child travelling alone or with only one parent to Australia.

Is a visa essential for a child in Australia?

Since 2017, all travellers to Australia who are under 18 years of age are considered adults under the law and must carry the same documents.

For example, to travel to Australia, a minor child must have an identity card or passport in their name and an electronic travel authorisation such as an eTA or eVisitor. If the child is not eligible for either of these electronic visas, you may also apply for a traditional visa at the Australian embassy or consulate in their country of residence.

What travel authorisation must a child have to travel to Australia?

In order to travel legally to Australia, a minor child must carry valid identification and a travel authorisation.

Identity cards are permitted for travel to Australia for children only, as well as a passport valid for 5 years.

Of course, the minor child must also have either a visa or a legal electronic travel authorisation for Australia such as the eTA or eVisitor. This residence permit is indeed mandatory, even for very young children.

If your minor child wishes to travel to Australia for tourism purposes, he or she will only need to present an eVisitor or eTA. Remember that these two electronic travel authorisations are similar but are not for the same nationalities. Thus, minors of English or European nationality must apply for an eVisitor visa for Australia. This is valid for one year and allows a maximum stay of 90 consecutive days in Australia. For other nationalities, such as Canadian or American children, the eTA Australia will be the preferred solution.

Apply for your Australia e-visa!

What other documents must a child have to travel to Australia?

Of course, a child wishing to travel alone to Australia will need, in addition to a visitor and a passport, an exit permit signed by both legal parents.

If the minor child is accompanied only by one parent, permission from the absent parent is also required. The second parent should also enclose a photocopy of his/her identity card or passport. You should also have a document showing parental authority and permission, as well as a travel permit for the destination country.

Finally, when travelling alone, it will be necessary to obtain an authorisation to leave the country signed by both parents, as well as copies of the identity documents of both legal parents. The same applies to children under guardianship or who have been adopted.

Although the Australian authorities do not release this document, we also advise you to take a copy of your child's birth certificate with you. A copy of your family record book may also be requested in the event of a thorough check. In order to avoid any disappointment when crossing borders, we advise you to take all these documents with you on your trip.

It is also worth remembering that if your child wishes to travel to Australia to study, they should apply for a specific visa.

How do I get an eVisitor visa for a child for Australia?

The online application for an eVisitor residence permit can only be made by one of the parents or legal guardians of the child wishing to travel to Australia. To do so, you just need to go to a website offering this type of application form, such as the website of our partner, whose link you will find on this page.

In the form, it would be necessary to indicate that you are filling in this application for a third person and in this case for a minor child. You should indicate the personal data of this child as well as your personal data as the child's legal guardian.

A passport number must also be entered, as well as a valid e-mail address to which the residence permit will be sent.

Once the form has been duly completed and checked, you can validate it by paying the fees required to process the eVisitor application. Note that this fee is the same whether you are applying for an eVisitor for a child or an adult and is mandatory for the application to be considered and processed.

Once the payment has been made, the visitor's request will be processed within a few days and you will receive a reply directly by e-mail to the e-mail address indicated in the form.

If you are travelling to Australia with your child, you can apply as a group by completing both your application form and your child's application form. This will save you valuable time, but you will still have to pay the necessary fees for both applications.

Conclusion: Does a child need an visa to travel to Australia?

When travelling to Australia, minor children must have an eTA or eVisitor visa, just like adults. The eTA or eVisitor is a mandatory document for foreign travellers who wish to enter Australia for a short period of time, for tourism or for a business visit. It is an online formality that checks for criminal history and other factors that may affect a person's eligibility to enter Australia.

Parents or legal guardians can apply for an eTA or eVisitor visa for their child using their own passport. It is important to note that children must have their own passport to travel to Australia. The passport must be valid for the duration of the stay in Australia and must include sufficient pages for entry and exit stamps.

Applying for an eTA or eVisitor visa for a child is usually a quick and easy process that can be done online. Parents or legal guardians must complete an online form providing information about their own passport, as well as the child's passport. They must also pay the fee associated with the eTA or eVisitor application.

Once the visa application is submitted and approved, the eTA or eVisitor will be linked to the child's passport. When the child arrives in Australia, they will need to present their passport and eTA or eVisitor to immigration authorities at the airport or port of entry. The immigration authorities will check the information provided in the eTA or eVisitor application to ensure that the child is authorised to enter Australia.

It is important to note that children travelling unaccompanied by a parent or legal guardian may need to provide additional evidence to prove they are authorised to enter Australia. 

Adeline HARMANT As a web writer and globetrotter with a passion for travel and tourism, I have acquired in-depth knowledge of the procedures that are essential for travellers. I help travellers to complete all the formalities required for a successful trip, particularly when it comes to obtaining a visa online. With several years' experience in this field, I'd like to offer you some valuable advice to help you discover the world with complete peace of mind.

Frequently asked questions

An electronic or conventional travel authorisation such as a visa, eTA or eVisitor is required to travel to Australia from birth. Thus a baby, even a few weeks old, will need to have a residence permit in its name. It is also necessary for the child to have an identity document such as an identity card or passport.

Yes, the price of an eVisitor for a child as for an adult will be the same. Indeed, the work involved in processing the application for an eVisitor is the same whether it is an application for a minor child or an adult. It is logical that the fees charged to applicants are similar. Remember that the fees are to be paid by credit card directly on the website where you make the application.

You can find a visa application form for Australia for a child on the same websites as for adults. We recommend that you use the services of our partner service provider, whose link you will find on this page, which will provide you with a form in English and assistance in filling it in.

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Is Form 1229 required for child under 18 years of age

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Seniors, Please let me know if I need to submit Form 1229 consent to grant an Australian visa for my 5-year-old son. My understanding is that it is required only for a child under the age of 18 not traveling with both parents or legal guardians. https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/forms/documents/1229.pdf  

travelling to australia under 18

That is my understanding too. It is also not required if only one parent has custody and is the only one travelling (as per the forms instructions).  

travelling to australia under 18

venugopal_b said: Seniors, Please let me know if I need to submit Form 1229 consent to grant an Australian visa for my 5-year-old son. My understanding is that it is required only for a child under the age of 18 not traveling with both parents or legal guardians. https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/forms/documents/1229.pdf Click to expand...

Any Update ??  

Form not required if both biological parents travelling with child.  

I am in Australia already. My husband and daughter are applying for the visa. Do I need to give consent form 1229?  

travelling to australia under 18

For my 491 visa application, Form 1229 is marked as a "required document", and it is also mentioned that "failure to attach any document will cause delay in processing". Is it OK to just fill out the form, if there is a chance that it will speed up the processing?  

We have the same problem. We need to attach it but both parents are applying for the visa. What did you end up doing @jaxxx123 ? Any advice?  

travelling to australia under 18

MaryNie said: We have the same problem. We need to attach it but both parents are applying for the visa. What did you end up doing @jaxxx123 ? Any advice? Click to expand...

travelling to australia under 18

Hi everyone, I have the same problem. Both the parents are travelling, and it is still asking for 1229. I'm going to fill and attach it anyways. However, can anyone please share how you upload it? By filling it out and Signing it online or taking a print, signing it and then scanning and uploading ?  

travelling to australia under 18

There is no problem…it’s just a form. Yeah… submitted the same….don’t need to take print out…u can if you want to…..I completed the form online and signed online as well…there are tools available Cheers  

Thank you so much for the prompt reply Mr. Kanav. I will do the same.  

travelling to australia under 18

We have been asked the same both parents travelling. One is visitor and other is Resident return. Can anyone confirm what happened to the status of your visa application for child after providing 1229, also did you pur in both parents details.  

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travelling to australia under 18

16 things to know before going to Australia

Natasha Bazika

Nov 3, 2023 • 10 min read

travelling to australia under 18

Follow these tips on health, safety, and etiquette for the best travel experience in Australia © John Crux Photography / Getty Images

As an Australian living in New York in my early 20s, I found myself fielding a wide range of questions about my home country.

Some were amusing, others were downright bewildering: “Do you ride kangaroos to school?” “Are there drop bears in the woods?” “Are Australian dollars really called ‘dollarydoos’?” 

Australia can feel like an enigma, particularly for foreign travelers. It's a land filled with myths and misconceptions that could fill volumes, and the idea of Australia being a homogenous country is far from accurate. In reality, it's a diverse mix of cultures and ethnicities, with a rich Indigenous history spanning tens of thousands of years. Australian cities are multicultural hubs and most Australians live in vibrant urban centers – a sharp contrast to the rugged Crocodile Dundee  stereotype.

This abundance of misinformation can make it challenging to prepare for a trip Down Under. To help you separate fact from fiction and ensure a smooth and enjoyable visit, here's a local’s guide to Australia and its people, including top tips on health, safety and etiquette.

Four people paddle along in small canoes in a water-filled gorge on a sunny day

1. There is no “right” time to visit Australia

Australia is almost as big as the United States, with everything from lush rainforests to snowy alps. Our weather varies significantly depending on where you are in the country and the time of year. The Northern Territory’s Top End remains hot year-round, with only two distinct seasons (the “wet” season and the “dry” season). In contrast, New South Wales experiences everything from blisteringly hot days during the summer to sub-zero temperatures during the winter. Even the Red Centre’s temperatures range from 3°C (37°F) to over 40°C (104°F) throughout the year.

Each state and region dances to its own climate tune, so think regionally when considering the best time for your visit  and pack accordingly. To catch Uluru at its best, for example, opt for cooler months (between May to September) to avoid walking the base on a scorching day. In Tasmania , coastal heaths bloom from late October to early November, while food festivals are held from March to May. Winter is when Tasmania and the mountainous regions of New South Wales and Victoria experience snowfall. Meanwhile, visitors might find themselves cooling off in ocean waters along the East Coast year-round. 

2. You’ll need to save money for your dream Australian holiday

Australia isn't known for being budget-friendly, particularly in cities such as Melbourne and Sydney. Iconic experiences like four-wheel driving across K’gari (formerly Fraser Island) or snorkeling on the  Great Barrier Reef can be expensive, with tours and experiences costing hundreds of dollars per person.

However, smart planning and a clear budget can help you make the most of your money. Many of Australia's top outdoor attractions are free; from scenic drives along the Great Ocean Road to swimming at Bondi Beach .

3. If you want to see a kangaroo, get out of the city

Kangaroos aren't a common sight on bustling city streets – but you don’t necessarily have to “go bush” to see them. Instead, you'll find them in suburban areas including on golf courses, where they love to congregate on the links.

However, most kangaroo encounters usually happen during hikes or on road trips through regional landscapes, especially at dusk and dusk when they’re most active. Farm stays are also a great option if you want to see more of Australia’s wildlife . (And before you ask: Yes, you can eat kangaroo. It’s delicious.)

Performers sing and dance on stage in a demonstration of Aboriginal culture

4. Australia is home to the oldest continuous living culture in the world

Australia's Indigenous population includes both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders . This population is not a single group, but rather a rich tapestry of  hundreds of distinct groups or “nations,” each with their own languages, histories, and cultural traditions. Translation? Not every group plays the didgeridoo or uses a boomerang.

During your visit, you’ll have the opportunity to learn more about the traditional landowners, with Aboriginal museums and art galleries dotted across the country. Indigenous-led tours – including those that are part of the  Discover Aboriginal Experiences collection – are a great way to learn more.

5. Be prepared to talk to strangers on the train

Aussies are incredibly friendly and enjoy a good chat. You might find someone starting a conversation with you on a train or even stopping you on the street for a quick “chinwag.”

Australians are also known for their courtesy and manners. They'll hold doors open and if you're in their way, they'll step aside. As a visitor, it's important to be mindful of your surroundings and return the favor by holding a door or an elevator – a small gesture that means a lot.

6. The Great Barrier Reef is vulnerable – but it’s not “dead”

The Great Barrier Reef – arguably Australia’s most iconic attraction – made headlines in 2016, when reports claimed it was “dead” following coral bleaching events.

There’s no question that climate change has had an adverse effect on the Great Barrier Reef . In addition to increasing water temperatures, the vulnerable ecosystem has also been impacted by pollution from land run-off and the increasing severity and frequency of cyclones. 

However, the Great Barrier Reef is more resilient than you think. It’s also far from lifeless. If you dive into the water, you may see evidence of bleaching events, but you’re just as likely to see colorful corals teeming with life. Increasingly, visitors can also get involved in reef restoration, including by participating in citizen science surveys such as  Eye on the Reef.

7. Walking around barefoot is normal

Be prepared to see many Aussies strolling around barefoot, even in cities and public places, such as grocery stores, cafes and hardware stores.  

Why? It all comes down to beach culture, which has a way of spilling over into everyday life, whether there’s sand and salt water present or not. 

Woman pushing an ebike along a path with two wildlife signs indicating that kangaroos and koalas are in the area

8. Keep a sense of perspective about crocs, snakes and spiders

Despite the famous belief that all wildlife Down Under is out to get you, a 2017 study conducted by Melbourne University researchers found that horses have caused more deaths in Australia than all the venomous creatures – including snakes and spiders – combined.

The reality is that crocodiles aren't wandering the streets (they’re only found along coastlines and waterholes in Western Australia, the Northern Territory and Queensland) and you’re more likely to encounter possums and harmless insects in buildings. Just be cautious of swooping magpies if you're in parks between August and October. This is when they’re breeding and are protecting their eggs or newly hatched chicks. 

9. Restaurant kitchens close between 3pm and 5pm 

Australia's urban and rural areas have their own life rhythm. In cities, restaurants tend to wrap up service by 11pm, but it's as early as 8pm in rural areas. Nightclubs and bars close around 2am.

What catches many travelers off-guard is that there's also a mid-afternoon dead zone between 3pm and 5pm, when the majority of cafes and restaurants are closed. Even the kitchens in pubs may not do food service at this time. If you’re after something to eat between these hours, fast food is your friend.

10. You don't need to tip in Australia

Australia's minimum wage is higher than in many countries. (At the time of writing, the national minimum wage is $23.23 per hour.) As a result, tipping isn’t customary in Australia, as all service charges are already factored into the cost of your meal. However, if you genuinely wish to show appreciation for outstanding service, tipping is at your discretion.

11. Australians speak an entirely different kind of English

Australians are renowned for their own unique take on the English language and you’re going to encounter a lot of slang from locals. Regional variations also exist, so if you meet someone from outback Queensland , they’re going to sound a little different to someone from Brisbane .

“Arvo” (good afternoon) is not to be confused with “avo” (avocado). You buy booze from the “bottle-o” and get “petty” (petrol or gas) from the “servo” (service station). Many words are abbreviated, with an “o” or “ie” added to the end. Endearing terms like “mate” are also common, but phrases you likely won’t hear (from anyone under the age of 60, at least) are “crikey” or “fair dinkum.” 

One thing you will hear? Colorful language. Don’t be surprised or take offense if you catch an Australian dropping a swear word during a chat. It’s normal.

12. Meat pie, Vegemite and chicken salt are must-try foods

Australia lacks a single defining cuisine, but few things are as quintessentially Aussie as tucking into a steaming meat pie, traditionally served in a paper bag with a generous squeeze of tomato sauce (ketchup). It's a deliciously messy experience and an integral part of Australian food culture .

Vegemite is also a must-have experience. Spread a thin layer (thin being very important) on toast for a salty kick. Speaking of salt, chicken salt on hot chips (fries) is a near-obligatory and delightful initiation for newcomers. This seasoning has been a popular add-on to fries since it was launched in Australia in 1979. (By the way, it’s usually vegan. There's no actual chicken in it; just a lot of MSG.)

A child wearing a stinger suit that completely covers their body and hands snorkels above a reef

13. Snorkeling on the Great Barrier Reef requires covering up

Are you excited about that cute holiday snap snorkeling on the Great Barrier Reef? Don’t spend too much time selecting a bathing suit for photo ops as nobody will see it. 

That’s because from May to November, it's stinger (jellyfish) season in tropical north Queensland. You'll need to don a rather stylish stinger suit supplied by your tour boat operator, complete with a hood and mitten-like hand covers. It might look a bit peculiar, but it's your best defense against the venomous and often hard-to-spot irukandji and box jellyfish that lurk in the water. It's much better than the alternative – getting stung.

14. People walk on the left

On sidewalks, trails and stairs, sticking to the left helps maintain a smooth flow of foot traffic and prevents any awkward dance moves with strangers trying to pass. Some train stations have arrows to direct the flow.

This practice also aligns with Australia's left-hand driving tradition. According to the UK’s National Motor Museum, driving on the left may have emerged as a safety measure, particularly when the main road hazard was highway robbery. Travelers would pass oncoming strangers on their right side, keeping their sword arm toward the passer-by. (Don't worry, you won't be jousted in Australia.)

15. The Outback can be unforgiving

Don't underestimate the harshness of the Australian Outback . Although it covers roughly 70% of the Australian continent, only around 5% of the population lives there. For those unprepared for its remote conditions, it can also present danger. A broken-down car, for example, could lead to heat exhaustion, dehydration, or worse.

So, if you're planning an independent outback road trip – to the Nullarbor Plain or  Flinders Ranges , for example – do your homework and prepare for anything and everything. Stock up on water, go slow (especially on gravel roads), and let someone know your plans because the phone signal is spotty at best. For added safety, consider a personal locator beacon to instantly alert emergency services in case of trouble. If that sounds daunting, countless tour operators are pros at taking tourists – safely – through these iconic landscapes.

16. Beware of dangerous currents when swimming in the ocean

The primary danger for swimmers at Australian beaches isn't the wildlife; it's the perilous underwater currents known as “rips.” Rip currents have the potential to pull swimmers out to sea and are typically found in areas with underwater sand banks that obstruct the free flow of water back to the shore.

Not every beach is patrolled by lifeguards, so it's best not to risk it if you're not a confident swimmer. Just dip your ankles in for the same feeling.

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Bring photo ID to vote Check what photo ID you'll need to vote in person in the General Election on 4 July.

  • Passports, travel and living abroad
  • Travel abroad

Bringing goods into the UK for personal use

Arriving in great britain.

If you’re travelling to Great Britain (England, Wales or Scotland) from outside the UK, you can bring in a certain amount of goods without paying tax or duty. This is known as your personal allowance.

When you’re bringing in goods you must:

  • transport them yourself
  • use them yourself or give them away as a gift

If you go over your personal allowance

  • declare your goods online before you travel or at the border when you arrive
  • pay tax and duty on all the goods in that category

Your goods could be seized if you do not declare them.

You cannot combine your personal allowance with anyone else.

Alcohol allowance

How much you can bring depends on the type of alcohol. You can bring in both:

  • beer - 42 litres
  • wine (still) - 18 litres

You can also bring in either:

  • spirits and other liquors over 22% alcohol - 4 litres
  • alcoholic drinks up to 22% alcohol (not including beer or still wine) - 9 litres

Alcoholic drinks up to 22% alcohol include:

  • sparkling wine
  • fortified wine (for example port, sherry)

You can split this last allowance. For example, you could bring 2 litres of spirits and 4.5 litres of fortified wine (both half of your allowance).

If you bring in 19 litres of wine, you must pay tax and duty on all of it because you have gone over your 18 litre allowance for wine

Tobacco allowance

You can bring in one of the following:

  • 200 cigarettes
  • 100 cigarillos
  • 250g tobacco
  • 200 sticks of tobacco for electronic heated tobacco devices

You can split this allowance - so you could bring in 100 cigarettes and 25 cigars (both half of your allowance).

If you bring in 200 cigarettes and 50 cigars, you must pay tax and duty on both the cigarettes and the cigars because you have gone over your allowance in the tobacco category

Alcohol and tobacco allowances if you’re under 17

There are no personal allowances for tobacco or alcohol if you’re under 17. You can bring alcohol and tobacco to the UK for your own use but you must declare them before you arrive in the UK.

Allowance for other goods

You can bring in other goods worth up to £390 (or up to £270 if you arrive by private plane or boat).

If you go over your allowance you pay tax and duty on the total value of the goods, not just the value above the allowance.

You may have to pay import VAT and customs duty if you exceed your allowance.

You may have to pay import VAT on the total value of the goods plus duty. You pay this at the current UK VAT rate .

Declaring goods made or produced in the EU

You do not need to pay any tax or duties on personal goods you bring into Great Britain as long as they are within your personal allowances.

If the goods are over your allowances you will need to:

  • declare them
  • pay any customs duty due
  • pay any excise duty due (for tobacco or alcohol)
  • pay any import VAT due

When you declare your goods you need to declare each item you bought. When you declare your items, you may not need to pay customs duty on items where all the following are true:

  • they were grown or made in the EU using only EU ingredients or materials
  • you bought them in the EU
  • you are bringing them in from an EU country

If these are true, you can claim a zero rate of customs duty for each item. You must:

  • have evidence these are true for each item you claim these rates for
  • be able to show this evidence if asked by a Border Force officer

The level of evidence you need depends on the total value of all the items you claim these rates for.

If the total value is less than £1,000

If the total value of all the items you declare is less than £1,000 the evidence for each item can be:

  • a label or packaging showing it was grown or made in the EU
  • evidence it was hand-made or grown in the EU (for example, a document or written note from the person or business you bought it from)

A Border Force officer might ask to see this evidence. If you are unable to show this, you will have to pay any customs duty you owe.

If the total value is more than £1,000

If the total value of all the items you declare is over £1,000, you can claim a zero rate of customs duty if you can prove each item was grown or made in the EU .

This proof could be an invoice or document from the person or business you bought the items from which includes the:

  • item you are buying
  • place and date you bought it
  • ‘statement on origin’

The ‘statement on origin’ is formal wording from the person or business you bought the items from which confirms:

  • the material used to make the item was from the EU
  • their registered exporter number (if the total value of all the items you declare is over £5,500)

You could also prove that you know how the items were made in the EU by using documents or records which show the item meets the rules of origin. The ‘importer’s knowledge’ section of the proof of origin guide explains how you do this. This applies if you bring in (import) these items for either personal or commercial use.

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I've traveled to over 80 countries by myself. Here are 8 things I do to stay safe.

  • After traveling solo since I was 18, I've hit over 80 countries.
  • I've made my fair share of mistakes, but I've learned how to stay safe while traveling alone.
  • Simple measures, like sharing my location, have helped me avoid unwanted situations.

Insider Today

I've been traveling on my own since I was 18. After visiting over 80 countries and 13 years of trial and error, I've learned a few important safety tips.

Although flight prices seem to be rising ahead of the summer surge, they're significantly cheaper than this time last year, so I'm itching to plan my next trip.

I follow these rules everywhere I travel — it doesn't matter how upscale or "safe" the destination is supposed to be.

Although some situations are unavoidable, here's what I do to stay safe and alert while traveling solo.

I always share my location and itinerary with someone close to me.

travelling to australia under 18

Before a trip, I always share my flight and hotel information with my mom. I've also gotten into the habit of sharing my live location with her (indefinitely).

Other than the fact that it gives her a sense of security, I know that if anything were to happen (or if she doesn't hear from me when expecting to), she would have enough information to make a few calls and confirm I'm safe.

It only takes a few minutes but can make a huge difference in the long run.

Wearing a flat crossbody or belt bag under my clothing is key.

travelling to australia under 18

I always avoid wearing backpacks and those trendy see-through bags — there's no need to make someone curious. I don't like having my purse and valuables super exposed because it makes me a prime target for pickpockets.

Although it's easier to wear belt bags in colder environments when I'm wearing layers, I can still manage in lighter clothing.

Lululemon's Everywhere Belt Bag, Athleta's Pacesetter Run Belt, and Peak Gear's Travel Money Belt have been my go-to for traveling . They're small and thin enough to wear under my clothing but can hold my essentials (cash, credit cards, a phone, my passport, and copies of my ID).

I don’t wear my expensive bling or designer pieces.

travelling to australia under 18

I typically want to look good for photos, but wearing expensive clothing and stand-out jewelry always attracts unwanted attention.

Wearing shiny necklaces and a stack of bangles while sporting a Gucci tracksuit makes it look like I have money, which is the opposite of what I want someone to think when I'm traveling alone.

It also means I'm less likely to successfully negotiate or barter a good price on items in markets.

There are basic things I research about each city or town I’ll be staying in.

travelling to australia under 18

I'm a super spontaneous traveler. Although I usually have a list of places I want to visit, I rarely follow a day-by-day itinerary.

Regardless, once I know where I'm going, I always take time to plan which area to stay in and book hotels in advance . I try to find the best neighborhoods, then I explore a list of hotel options and select them based on reviews, location, and overall vibe.

I also always ask the front desk staff if there are any areas I should avoid once I check in — not everything is online.

Sometimes, I'll even look for female-oriented hotels or ones with mostly female staff members because that makes me feel a little more comfortable.

Looking lost or scared is asking for trouble.

travelling to australia under 18

How you carry yourself is a big deal. If I'm lost, I typically use the Maps.me app, which allows me to use maps even while offline.

I try to pop into a coffee shop — or even a bathroom stall — to look at the map and get my bearings. If I can't find a place to make a pitstop, I'll walk to a more populated area with lots of traffic.

If worse comes to worse, I'll just hail a taxi to take me back to my hotel.

Looking lost makes it pretty obvious you're a tourist and gives the impression that you're willing to accept help from anyone. Unfortunately, some people take advantage of situations like that.

For the same reasons, I also never walk around looking frightened, even if I'm freaking out on the inside.

There are different transportation apps all over the world, so I make sure I have the right one.

travelling to australia under 18

Not everywhere has Uber or even many taxis. I always look up popular transportation apps wherever I'm traveling and download them on my phone.

I usually even enter and save my credit card information, so I'm ready to roll and don't find myself stuck when I reach the destination.

I make sure I have enough cash with me.

travelling to australia under 18

I've traveled to places where credit cards aren't widely accepted, or I can't withdraw cash from ATMs.

To avoid that panic, I always carry cash and exchange it for the local currency at the airport or hotel.

I don't keep it all on me when I'm exploring — I just carry some with me and leave the rest safely locked in my suitcase.

I've learned to not say yes to everything.

travelling to australia under 18

When I travel alone, I'm bound to meet new people, and sometimes they invite me to parties or for drinks. But I always politely decline.

Nothing good has ever come from drinking with strangers in a foreign place, in my experience. And I always want to be clear-minded enough to pick up on strange or dangerous situations.

I don't even share my plans with strangers I meet, and I never post my real-time locations on social media.

It might seem obvious, but I also don't accept rides from strangers because then they'll know my whereabouts.

travelling to australia under 18

  • Main content

Virgin Airlines passengers back at Queenstown Airport, resume travel to Australia after horror flight

Share this article

  • Passengers onboard the Melbourne-bound flight that caught on fire will leave Queenstown this afternoon.
  • Virgin Airways flight VA148 was diverted to Invercargill after a bird, potentially a duck, was suspected to have been sucked into the engine soon after take-off.
  • A loud bang was heard by passengers before flames were seen coming from the right side of the aircraft.

Passengers from a “horrifying” flight that caught fire in the skies above Queenstown are juggling nerves as they prepare to catch new flights out this afternoon.

The engine on the Melbourne-bound Virgin Airways flight burst into flames soon after take-off last night forcing a diversion and emergency landing at Invercargill airport.

A bird, possibly a duck, is thought to have caused the fire after being sucked into the aircraft.

Passengers on board heard a loud “bang” before seeing flames out the window.

Most on board the flight have arrived back at Queenstown Airport after being bussed up from Invercargill this morning.

They now face a two-legged journey to Melbourne via Brisbane, with their flight scheduled to leave at 4.30pm.

The Civil Aviation Authority said the risk of bird strikes at Queenstown airport was “low” but bird activity “varies according to the season and migratory patterns”.

David, a traveller from the Czech Republic who was onboard Virgin Australia flight 148, called the ordeal a “scary experience”.

”We saw some lights in the windows, so we were just talking - having a bit of fun about it - but after that, it was so scary.”

Passengers have arrived at Queenstown Airport ahead of their journey to Melbourne via Brisbane. Photo / Vera Alves

“It was a good experience for life, it was something I had never seen.

”So many people in our group, I am sure, they are so scared [to get on another flight].”

Cleon, of Melbourne, was celebrating his 30th birthday when the incident happened.

”It was a weird experience. It was quite calm on the plane when it happened. They [the crew] did a good job of keeping it under wraps.

”But of course, when you see flames emitting from the side of your plane, you think ‘this is it’.

“So I was just making sure to keep my mum calm and tell her I love her.

”At the end of the day, it’s how you deal with this kind of situation. Whoever I love was there with me.”

Flames engulfed an engine on a Virgin Airlines flight bound for Melbourne. Photo / Michael Hayward

Valu Sala, of Melbourne, said she panicked when the incident happened. She is originally from Invercargill and acknowledged the coincidence of an unexpected journey home.

“There were sounds that were unfamiliar to me and it was quite [hot] on the side [of the plane].

“I panicked. No information as to what was happening came forth [from the flight crew] until after a while.

“The plane was not going at full speed.

“I was not too sure what was happening. ‘Would we arrive safely? Would we land safely?’ - Those were the thoughts in my mind.

“And then I looked to the side, and I said ‘please, don’t let tell me you’ll be the last person I see before … you know? Just thoughts of movies and other incidents of plane crashes.

Passengers checking in for their flight to Melbourne via Brisbane. Photo / Vera Alves

Woody Matthews from Fort Worth, Texas, said he felt a “jolt” when the engine caught alight.

He was heading to Melbourne to meet up with some friends from the Lions Club.

Matthews praised the airline’s professionalism and said he was not nervous to get on today’s flight.

Michael Hayward took a video from his seat, which he posted online, showing flames shooting from the side of the Virgin Airlines plane before it diverted to Invercargill, where it landed safely, about 7pm.

He said he heard the sound about 10 seconds after take-off.

“Flames started to shoot out the right-hand engine as it tried to restart itself.

“Initially after the bang, there was some panic and crying, but this very quickly stopped as people comforted each other, and within minutes, laughter as people joked about how they [would] get home without flying, they’ll never go on a plane again.”

A Queenstown airport spokesperson said they suspected it was a duck that had been sucked into the engine.

Adam, of Sweden, said he started praying for his life when he realised there was a fire.

“It was a bit scary. At first, it was just confusing. I saw flashing lights and banging sounds, but I didn’t really understand what it was.

“But then I heard other passengers talking about a fire and I started to worry a bit. But I tried to remain cool, did some prayers - maybe it was a bit dramatic but it was a good thing to do.

Zoe, of Perth, called the incident terrifying, wiping away tears as she spoke to the Herald.

”I think I’m just happy that I’m going home. Everyone has bad experiences sometimes, and this is just one of those.”

Virgin Australia plane shooting flames from its starboard engine shortly after taking off from Queenstown. Photo / Eliot Squires

Virgin Australia chief operations officer Stuart Aggs said passengers would be taken back to Queenstown by bus, flown to Brisbane at 4.30pm before leaving for Melbourne at 9.25pm.

Virgin Airlines confirmed 73 people were on board - 67 passengers and six crew.

Meanwhile, Queenstown Airport’s chief executive believes a large bird must have been involved in the Virgin Airways incident

Glen Sowry said that a bird strike couldn’t be confirmed until the 737′s engine was inspected.

As stressful as it was for passengers to see flames outside the plane, it was “not unusual” for birds to get into a plane’s engine and the passengers were “not in any danger” at any point during the incident.

Sowry told the Herald that, as common as it was to get birds into the engine during a flight, they were not normally as big as he suspected this particular bird was.

travelling to australia under 18

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Ban on chiropractors manipulating babies' spines reinstated

Melbourne chiropractor Ian Rossborough cracks a baby's back

A ban on the spinal manipulation of children under the age of two has been reinstated by the body that oversees chiropractors in Australia.

The interim ban had been in place since 2019, but was lifted under guidelines from the Chiropractic Board of Australia.

The lifting of the interim ban was described as "reckless" by the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners.

The Chiropractic Board of Australia has reinstated the interim ban following a request from Australia's federal and state health ministers.

Dr Wayne Minter wears a suit and tie

Chair of the Chiropractic Board of Australia Wayne Minter said chiropractors were expected to abide by the interim ban until a final position was reached on whether spinal manipulation of children under two was allowed.

"While there has been no evidence of serious harm to infants from chiropractic care in Australia, the Board's role is first and foremost to protect the public," Dr Minter said in a statement.

"We look forward to working with Ministers to develop an evidence-based final policy on paediatric care that balances the paramount need to protect patients, with the right for parents and other patients to have a say in the care they choose."

The Chiropractic Board commissioned healthcare researcher Cochrane Australia to review the safety and effectiveness of spinal manipulation on children aged under 12.

The board reinstated the practice after Cochrane delivered its findings in November 2023.

Dr Minter said the interim ban would remain in place pending further consultation with health ministers. 

"The Board is committed to ensuring the public has access to, and receives, safe, ethical and competent care from registered chiropractors," he said.

"We welcome any engagement with ministers that can further strengthen responsible practice."

A grey-haired man in a suit sits and smiles.

The spinal manipulation of babies has been touted as a way to manage colic, back and neck pain, ear infections and twisted neck.

But some medical groups said there was no evidence it was effective and argued it could potentially put the spinal health of children at risk.

Chair of child and young person health at the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, James Best, said last week the potential return of the practice was "deeply disturbing".

"It's certainly something I wouldn't do to my child, so I would advise parents to not allow this sort of practice to be done to your child," he said.

"The spinal columns of young children and babies are really susceptible to injuries."

The Australian Chiropractors Association said it was disappointed with the reinstatement of the ban, saying spinal manipulation was not the full picture of the treatment they offered young children. 

Association president David Cahill called it a knee-jerk reaction.

"Chiropractic care of children is very gentle and is not 'cracking babies'," Dr Cahill said.

Dr Cahill said there had been no evidence of a child harmed in Australia, and he hoped to see the ban lifted. 

The Australian Medical Association called for more research in the field while the ban was in effect. 

AMA federal president Steve Robson said chiropractic treatments were largely unstudied and any treatment for children should be evidence based.

"The ban should remain in place until we get full evidence one way or the other," Professor Robson said.

Australian health ministers will consult with the Chiropractic Board of Australia to determine if the ban will become permanent. 

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COMMENTS

  1. Welfare and custody arrangements for students under 18

    If you are applying for a student visa and you are under 18 years of age, you must give us: a Form 1229 - Consent to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18, or a statutory declaration from each parent or legal guardian with their consent. Your parent (s) or legal guardian (s) must complete, sign and return the form.

  2. Applying for a visitor visa

    If you are under 18 years old and you intend to travel without a parent or guardian and you will not be staying with a relative or travelling with an organised tour, you must include both of the forms below with your application: Form 1229 - Consent to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years. Your parent/s or legal ...

  3. Visitor Visa for Child Under 18 Australia

    zmi5i. May 13, 2024. If you are planning to bring a child under the age of 18 to Australia as a visitor, there are some specific requirements and considerations that you will need to take into account. For a subclass 600 visa, both parents (or all people with custody of the child) must provide their consent for the child to travel to Australia ...

  4. Under-18 International Student Visa holders

    The University of Sydney welcomes applications by suitably qualified under-18 international students and is guided by requirements set out in the ESOS Framework. If you are an under-18 student who has an offer for study and intend on travelling to Australia on a student visa, you will need to have formal arrangements in place for accommodation ...

  5. Travelling with children

    Help from the Attorney-General's Department. The Attorney-General's Department may be able to help if someone has taken your child overseas without your consent. Contact the International Family Law Section: 1800 100 480 (within Australia) +61 2 6141 3100 (from overseas) [email protected].

  6. PDF This page is intentionally blank

    Where children under 18 years of age intend to travel to Australia, their non-accompanying parent(s) or person(s) with parental responsibility (anyone who can lawfully determine where the child/children is/are to live) may be required to sign a consent form to give permission for the child/children to be granted an Australian visa for the ...

  7. Child custody for an Australian Visa: Do I Need a Form 1229?

    If you intend to travel to Australia with a child under 18 years of age, you might need to complete a Form 1229 if the child has: a non-accompanying parent (s); or. other person (s) with parental responsibility for them. This article deals with circumstances where a Form 1229 is required, and why.

  8. International students under 18 years of age

    Student visas. International students under 18 years of age. International students under the age of 18 on arrival in Australia must have approved accommodation and welfare arrangements in place before a student visa can be issued. These arrangements are regulated by the Australian Department of Home Affairs (DHA), as per Standard 5 (Younger ...

  9. Bringing your family

    Bringing your child/children. The Australian Government will only grant a student visa to your child if they are under 18 years of age when a decision is made on your visa application. They must apply for their own visa if they are 18 or older. You will need to pay for any dependent children to go to either a public or private school in Australia.

  10. Preparing to travel

    Pre-departure Checklist. This pre-departure checklist will help you prepare for your travels to Australia. 1. Passport. Check that your passport is valid for at least six months prior to your arrival in Australia. It is also a good idea to make a copy of your passport and leave it with a family member in case of an emergency. 2.

  11. International students under 18 years of age

    Welfare requirements for international students under 18 years of age. If you are an international student under 18 years old, you must have welfare arrangements in place to apply for your student visa. This is to ensure that you are living in a secure environment with adequate practical and emotional support to keep you safe before you turn 18.

  12. Travelling to Australia with children on an ETA or eVisitor visa

    Under 25 years of age when the application is submitted. If the child is over 18, they must also be a full-time student and financially dependent on the sponsor; Unmarried, not engaged, and not in a de-facto relationship; When travelling to Australia with children, you should also ensure that you are up-to-date with any additional requirements.

  13. What is a Child Travel Consent

    A child travel consent is a document that shows authorities and foreign officials that a minor (e.g. a child under the age of 18 years) has permission from all legal guardians/custodians to travel. It may be required in the following circumstances: where the child is travelling alone. It is particularly important when a child is travelling ...

  14. Unaccompanied minors travelling without parents

    At Qantas, we consider a child under 12 years to be an Unaccompanied Minor if the child is travelling without the supervision of, or travelling in a separate cabin to: a parent or guardian, a sibling aged 15 years or older, or. an adult nominated by the child's parent or guardian. If your child requires special assistance or needs specific care ...

  15. If you are under 18

    According to Australian immigration regulations, you can study in Australia if you are aged under 18 and: you are accompanied by a parent or legal custodian, or. you stay with a suitable relative, or. your education provider provides a written statement saying that your accommodation, support and general welfare arrangements are appropriate.

  16. Under 18 international students

    The University has strict legal obligations to under 18 students and there's a high level of risk involved in student absences. For these reasons, we'll only approve a request to be absent from approved accommodation in one of the following circumstances: you're required to be absent to attend compulsory University activities.

  17. Study in Australia as a Minor and Student Visa

    Besides the above additional requirements, students under 18 years of age will also need to meet other standard requirements for a student visa. Please refer to our Student Visa Subclass 500 for information about other requirements. Employment. In Australia, the minimum age to work is from around 13 to 15 years old, depending on the industry.

  18. How To Complete Form 1229

    Form 1229 - Complete this form if you are the non-accompanying parent(s) or person(s) with parental responsibility and want to give permission for a child/ch...

  19. Child passport general information

    Children aged 15 and under get five-year passports. Children aged 16 or 17 get 10-year passports. Why can't people under 18 have an Auspassport account to complete applications online? Under the Electronic Transactions Act 1999, we can only accept applications completed online by people aged 18 years and older. I'm under 18 and have married.

  20. Children: Is an eTA or eVisitor required for Australia?

    Children travelling to Australia must have their own passport; Other documents may be required for a child travelling alone or with only one parent to Australia. Is a visa essential for a child in Australia? Since 2017, all travellers to Australia who are under 18 years of age are considered adults under the law and must carry the same documents.

  21. Travelling to AUS alone at 17

    67 reviews. 311 helpful votes. 3. Re: Travelling to AUS alone at 17. 7 years ago. Over 15s can travel unaccompanied. You just need your passport with an electronic visa. You don't need a letter. The ability to make connections is more an issue of your own confidence and ability to read signs than it is about age.

  22. Is Form 1229 required for child under 18 years of age

    Seniors, Please let me know if I need to submit Form 1229 consent to grant an Australian visa for my 5-year-old son. My understanding is that it is required only for a child under the age of 18 not traveling with both parents or legal guardians.

  23. 16 things to know before going to Australia

    10. You don't need to tip in Australia. Australia's minimum wage is higher than in many countries. (At the time of writing, the national minimum wage is $23.23 per hour.) As a result, tipping isn't customary in Australia, as all service charges are already factored into the cost of your meal.

  24. Travel Insurance for Children and Under 18s

    For travel insurance purposes, the most common maximum age for dependent children is 21 years of age, but providers may set an age limit ranging from 18 to 25 years of age, based on research using travel insurance providers on Canstar's database. Canstar research has found that if a child is older than 18, there can often be criteria for them ...

  25. Bringing goods into the UK for personal use

    Bringing in goods for personal use when you travel to the UK from abroad - types of tax and duty, duty free, EU and non-EU arrivals, banned and restricted goods.

  26. Visa-free travel to China welcomed by people wanting to reunite with

    Jenny Zhang is looking forward to travelling to China under the visa-free scheme to visit her 100-year-old mum. ... It will provide great convenience to Chinese people living in Australia," she said.

  27. Tips for Staying Safe Traveling Alone, Frequent International Traveler

    I've been traveling on my own since I was 18. After visiting over 80 countries and 13 years of trial and error, I've learned a few important safety tips. Although flight prices seem to be rising ...

  28. Virgin Airlines passengers back at Queenstown Airport, resume travel to

    Virgin Australia chief operations officer Stuart Aggs said passengers would be taken back to Queenstown by bus, flown to Brisbane at 4.30pm before leaving for Melbourne at 9.25pm. Advertisement ...

  29. Australia's Shortage of Air Traffic Controllers Sparks Jet Collision

    Concerns among pilots about a possible mid-air collision are spilling over in Australia as a shortage of air traffic controllers leaves airport towers unmanned, forcing passenger jets to fend for ...

  30. Ban on chiropractors manipulating babies' spines reinstated

    The Chiropractic Board of Australia has reinstated an interim ban on the spinal manipulation of children under the age of two following a request from federal and state health ministers ...