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Yale University

tours of yale university

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Yale University is situated 90 minutes from New York in the city of New Haven, Connecticut.

Whether you’re in town for an admissions information session or simply want to join one of the many activities happening here, we invite you to explore our campus and community. Take a guided tour, attend a concert, or stroll through our scenic and historic Old Campus.

  • Coming to Yale

Visiting Yale

Travel arrangements.

Yale is located in New Haven, Connecticut, one of the best small cities in America, situated two-and-a-half hours south of Boston and one-and-a-half hours north of New York City. New Haven has many attractions including a thriving downtown district with parks, shops, museums, hotels, and restaurants. Its neighborhoods are home to historic buildings and diverse communities. Beyond the city limits lie beautiful beaches, peaceful lakes, charming New England towns, and pastoral suburbs. New Haven is easily accessible by car, train, bus, and airplane.

If coming from abroad, the easiest way to travel to Yale University is by air. There are a number of nearby airports serviced by international airlines.

Bradley International Airport  (BDL) in Windsor Locks, Connecticut

John F. Kennedy International Airport  (JFK) in New York City

LaGuardia International Airport  (LGA) in New York City

Newark Liberty International Airport  (EWR) in Newark, New Jersey

Tweed New Haven Airport  (HVN) in New Haven, Connecticut

Amtrak provides services from Newark airport to New Haven’s Union Station. For all other airports, private shuttle services are available through  Connecticut Limousine  (800.472.5466 ) and GO Airport Shuttle (866.284.3247 ). Please be sure to make reservations for shuttle services well in advance. Taking a taxi from any of these airports except for Tweed is not recommended.

If traveling from within the United States, it is convenient to take a train to New Haven Union Station, minutes from Yale’s campus.

Metro-North Railways  (800.638.7647) offers frequent train service between New Haven and New York City.

Amtrak  (800.872.7245) provides train service to New Haven from Vermont, Providence, Boston, and Washington DC.

Once you reach the station, we suggest that you use a local taxi service to reach campus. There is a taxi stand at the station; a taxi ride costs approximately $10. Alternatively, local shuttles and bus services are also available for travel between Union Station and Yale.

If traveling from within the United States, it is also possible to take a bus to New Haven Union Station, which also serves as a bus terminal.

Greyhound  (203.772.2470)

Peter Pan  (800.343.9999)

There are multiple driving routes that you can take to arrive on campus. As a result, we recommend entering your intended Yale destination into your GPS.

Immigration Services

Yale attracts a diverse set of international visitors – students, faculty and staff, and visiting lecturers and short-term guests. Foreign citizens traveling to the United States may need visas for temporary stays. Admitted students and visiting scholars should contact their program to learn more about the necessary immigration procedures.

Health insurance coverage

To access health insurance coverage at a reasonable rate for incoming short-term international students, scholars and other visitors to campus, individuals are encouraged to do their own research and read any plan documentation carefully before enrolling. One available option is Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI), which has experience working with academic customers and provides a plan that exceeds the requirements for J-1 visa holders. (Please note, this plan is not endorsed by Yale; the link below is provided for informational purposes only).

CISI for Yale University – International (culturalinsurance.com)

Tours: Visitor Center

The Yale Visitor Center, located at 149 Elm Street, offers visitors a glimpse into the history and architecture of the University. Hear about Yale’s rich 300-year history and aspects of student life within Yale’s twelve residential colleges.

International groups can request to have a tour given in a foreign language by contacting the Visitor Center at least two weeks prior to the tour. Call the Visitor Center (203.432.2300) or check their  website  for more information.

New Haven Attractions

New Haven is a vibrant cultural hub with renowned locally-owned restaurants, world-class theaters and museums, and an eclectic mix of shops and boutiques for visitors and locals to enjoy.

  • Yale Museums and Exhibition Spaces

Local Accommodations 

The following hotels are in New Haven, Connecticut and are located within a short distance of the Yale campus:

  • The Blake Hotel 9 High Street203.390.5352
  • The Graduate 1151 Chapel Street475.207.7070
  • Hotel Marcel 500 Sargent Drive203.780.7800
  • The Study at Yale
  • 1157 Chapel Street866.930.1157 
  • Omni New Haven Hotel at Yale 155 Temple Street800.THE-OMNI or 203.772.6664
  • Courtyard New Haven at Yale 30 Whalley Avenue 800.321.2211  or 203.777.6221
  • New Haven Hotel 229 George Street800.644.6835  or 203.498.3100
  • New Haven Village Suites 3 Long Wharf Drive866.458.0232  or 203.777.5337
  • La Quinta Inn & Suites 400 Sargent Drive 800.753.3757  or 203.562.1111 

The  New Haven Convention and Visitors Bureau  maintains a complete list of area hotels to assist you in planning your trip to New Haven.

Architecture of Yale

From the marbled Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library to the Saarinen-designed Ingalls Rink known affectionately as “The Whale”, explore highlights of Yale’s stunning architecture.

Browse Gallery

Lawrance Hall

Lawrance Hall, 1885-86

Architect: Russell Sturgis, Jr. (1836-1909, M.A., Honorary, 1872)

Between 1869 and 1876, Russell Sturgis completed the troika of Durfee Hall, Battell Chapel, and Farnam Hall at the corner of College and Elm Streets. It was fitting, then, that Sturgis was again tapped for Lawrance Hall, completed in 1886 and adjacent to Farnam on College Street. The layout of Lawrance is almost indistinguishable from those of Durfee and Farnam, with their brick façades evoking the red-hued Old Brick Row buildings that they replaced. It is, however, the towers and turrets of Lawrance’s College Street front that are most memorable.

Connecticut Hall, Old Brick Row, 1750-1752

Architect: President Thomas Clap (1703-1767)

The only surviving building from the Old Brick Row, Connecticut Hall is the oldest building on Yale’s campus. Despite its name and long history, however, Connecticut Hall is in many ways a Harvard building — its design is rooted in that of the 1720 Massachusetts Hall in Cambridge. Regardless, the dormitory that Clap built provided much-needed housing for Yale, and its construction marked the beginning of the entryway system at Yale. Ultimately transformed from a dormitory into a meeting hall and office space, Connecticut Hall was given a neighbor in 1925, McClellan Hall, which is so architecturally dependent on its twin that students have been known to cry out, “For God, for Country and for Symmetry.”

Dwight Hall (Old Library), 1842-46

Architect: Henry Austin (1804-1891)

Henry Austin, who designed Dwight Hall, built more for the City of New Haven than for Yale itself — his work for the Elm City includes its City Hall and the widely acclaimed gates of the Grove Street Cemetery. But his time in New Haven began at Yale, where he designed a brownstone-clad library that was converted into Dwight Hall in 1930. Austin’s was the first building on campus designed in the Gothic Revival tradition, marking a significant departure from the Old Brick Row of the 18th century, and thereby setting the principal direction of campus architecture to this day.

Branford and Saybrook Colleges (Memorial Quadrangle), 1921

Architect: James Gamble Rogers (1867-1947, B.A. 1889, M.A., Honorary, 1921) Gate by Samuel Yellin (1885-1940)

The list of buildings James Gamble Rogers designed for Yale between World War I and World War II is almost endless; it is certainly too long to include here. But none is finer than the Memorial Quadrangle, today housing students in Branford and Saybrook Colleges in a Gothic residential complex with six variously proportioned courts that provide a sense of intimacy and grandeur in the shadows of the 216-foot-tall Harkness Tower and behind Samuel Yellin’s masterful iron gate.

Street Hall, 1864

Architect: Peter B. Wight (1838-1925)

When first completed, Street Hall stood alone on the corner of Chapel and High Streets, a beacon of Yale’s then-nascent engagement with New Haven that could, per a donor’s wish, be entered either from the Old Campus or from the city sidewalk. When an upcoming renovation of the building is complete, though, visitors will be able to enter it from yet another side — the Yale University Art Gallery across High Street. The Art Gallery will expand across the bridge over High Street into Street Hall, filling the space left open after the History of Art Department moved to the Loria Center in 2008. The exterior of Street Hall will remain the same, though, with its restless, asymmetrical massing and its mix of dark and light stones.

Yale Center for British Art, 1977

Architect: Louis I. Kahn (1901-1974, faculty 1947-59, D.F.A. 1965)

Chapel Street between High and York Streets yields the pleasure of seeing Louis Kahn’s work at the beginning of his career, with the Art Gallery extension he designed in 1953 on the campus-side of Chapel and, across from it, the Yale Center for British Art completed in 1977, three years after the architect’s death. Kahn’s engagement with light is obvious in both museums, as is his engagement with the street. Amazingly, the actual entrance to the Center for British Art at the corner of High Street is rather difficult to find below the concrete framed-stainless steel façade; visitors can seem bewildered until they see, some 40 feet behind the low recess, a pair of glass doors leading to top-lit atrium, one of two in the building. Upon entering the Center for British Art, then, visitors discover the true magic of Kahn’s work — the way in which light and visitor and art interact.

Old Art Gallery, 1928

Architect: Egerton Swartwout (1870-1943, B.A. 1891)

It is difficult to imagine Chapel Street today as Egertown Swartwout did in 1926. Swartwout’s proposal for an Art Gallery to unite the University’s then-scattered art holdings was to extend all the way along the length of Chapel Street from High Street to York Street. The design was not fully realized because of limited funding; Swartwout had planned for seventeen Italian Gothic arches, but only five were built. The architect’s impact was still great, as the bridge connecting the building to Street Hall above High Street reframes the boundary between city and campus as no other Yale building does. Following the 2006 renovation of Louis Kahn’s addition, the Swartwout portion is also scheduled to be renovated.

Rudolph Hall (Art & Architecture Building), 1963

Paul Rudolph (1918-1997, Dept. of Architecture chairman 1958-65) Restoration by Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects Charles Gwathmey (b. 1938, M.ARCH 1962)

Paul Rudolph’s Art & Architecture Building is called Brutalist with good reason, especially by those students and teachers who brush against its rough, corduroy-like walls. But it is also an intensely lyrical building that fittingly completes the march of art buildings on Chapel Street. Its vast, open spaces scattered among 37 levels on nine floors were intended to encourage interaction among students of art and architecture who might otherwise remain cloistered from one other. With the completion in 2000 of Holcombe T. Green Hall to house the School of Art, Rudolph Hall is the exclusive home of the School of Architecture. Rudolph Hall has had a difficult past: It suffered an unexplained fire 1969, and was not treated well for much of its subsequent history until the just-completed renovation by Charles Gwathmey that has restored the building to glory.

Loria Center for the History of Art, 2008

Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects Charles Gwathmey (b. 1938, M.ARCH 1962)

There are few tasks in the world of architecture as daunting as the one Charles Gwathmey faced in designing the Loria Center for the History of Art: To build a neighbor for Paul Rudolph’s Art & Architecture Building, and make it one that is both an appropriate addition and a distinctive design in its own right. The 87,000-square-foot building is a little of each — the use of zinc and limestone to clad its main volume establishes an identity for the History of Art building, while acknowledging the palette of materials used not only in Rudolph Hall but also those of James Gamble Rogers’ residential colleges just down York Street and Louis Kahn’s two museums on Chapel Street. Gwathmey’s design is at its best, however, on the inside, where long hallways terminate in spontaneous views of the campus that unite the Loria Center not only with Rudolph Hall but also with much of Yale and New Haven.

Davenport College, 1933

Architect: James Gamble Rogers (1867-1947, B.A. 1889, M.A., Honorary, 1921)

Davenport College sits on a location that called on James Gamble Rogers both to protect the aesthetic he established with the Memorial Quadrangle and to establish a new and distinct design across York Street. Indeed, while Davenport’s Gothic front seems almost entirely in unison with the fine stonework of the Memorial Quadrangle, the College seems far different once inside its gates. Here, the Georgian style takes over and one is reminded not of Branford or Saybrook College, but rather of the red brick of Yale’s 18th century past.

Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges, 1962

Architect: Eero Saarinen (1910-1961, B.F.A. 1934, M.A., Honorary, 1949)

Eero Saarinen remarked during the construction of Stiles and Morse Colleges that he had embarked “on unchartered waters” in his design. In many ways, this is true: The coarse walls of a poured concrete-and-stone mixture with thin strips of vertical windows and the complex’s overall massing and layout (there are no right angles) are indeed unique. What is most splendid about Stiles and Morse, however, is that despite their idiosyncratic modernity they are nonetheless in harmony with the rest of campus, with two towers that establish strong ties to the nearby Payne Whitney Gymnasium and Hall of Graduate Studies, and a winding alley between the two colleges that at once calls to mind the streets of Italian hill towns such as San Gimignano and the intimate courtyards of James Gamble Rogers’s residential colleges of the 1920s.

Payne Whitney Gymnasium, 1932

Architect: John Russell Pope (1874 – 1937, M.A., Honorary, 1924)

John Russell Pope had bold plans for Yale — his 1919 master plan called for a consistent Gothic aesthetic on campus and the creation of axes and vistas to unify what was at the time a haphazard collection of buildings. Although his vision was never realized in full, the Cross Campus of today is essentially Pope’s brainchild; interestingly, had Pope had his way, the Cross Campus would have been home to a large gymnasium. Instead, under the watch of James Gamble Rogers, the Payne Whitney Gymnasium was placed at the edge of the Central Campus, although the commission went to Pope. His building, jokingly referred to as the “Cathedral of Sweat,” is almost spiritually Gothic, and its 240-foot-tall tower rising from a broad base is certainly large enough to house all the athletic activities one could imagine.

Sterling Memorial Library, 1930

Located at the heart of today’s Central Campus, the Sterling Memorial Library is Yale’s most prominent — and perhaps grandest — building. Ostensibly designed by James Gamble Rogers, the Library owes its fundamental character to Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, who was the architect of record for the project until his death in 1924. It was Goodhue who devised the concept of a low, intensely Gothic building with a stack tower at the back. Rogers developed Goodhue’s design but reconfigured its plan to provide for a nave-like space leading to the reference desks. Various special reading rooms are arranged to either side, including the Starr Main Reference Room and the Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, added in 1998. In the final realization it is Gamble Rogers’s hand clearly at work, revealing in the building’s details his superb wit. Indeed, as a carving on the Library’s Wall Street façade exhorts in Latin, Sterling is a place to “make haste slowly.”

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 1963

Skidmore, Owings and Merrill Gordon Bunshaft (1909-1990) Sculpture Garden by Isamu Noguchi (1904 – 1988)

The Beinecke is a building that has grown on Yale. At first decried by many as bombastic, it now has a strangely quiet presence in the midst of the vast granite-paved expanse of its plaza, punctuated by a sunken courtyard with sculpture by Isamu Noguchi. Inside, there is no doubt that this is a building that whispers. The Vermont-marble panels filter sunlight so that the Beinecke is dim at all hours; its books are housed in a six-story glass box around which a second-floor hall exhibits treasures from the collection. Hidden from view is the expansive space below ground that provides space for research and study. In its abstraction, the Beinecke stands in contrast to its neighbors: Howells & Stokes’s Woodbridge Hall, and the robustly classical 1901 Bicentennial Buildings — Woolsey Hall and Commons — designed by Carrere & Hastings.

Malone Engineering Center, 2005

Cesar Pelli & Associates Cesar Pelli (1926 - , D.F.A., Honorary, 2008)

Gazing north from the fourth floor of Cesar Pelli’s Malone Center, the view is seemingly endless. Four stories provide all the height one needs in New Haven: The sights range from East Rock to West Rock, from Ingalls Rink to the Kline Biology Tower, from the Yale of today to the Yale of tomorrow. The design is both sustainable (it earned LEED-gold certification) and social, encouraging interaction among scientists. The Malone Center’s combination of a boldly curved glass façade along its Farmington Canal front and a stone façade along Prospect Street recalls the whimsically two-sided Davenport College.

Ingalls Rink, 1958

Eero Saarinen (1910 — 1961, B. Arch, 1934; M.A., Honorary, 1949) Renovation and expansion by Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates Kevin Roche (1922 — , D.F.A., Honorary, 1995)

Whether you think it looks like a Viking ship, a turtle, or a whale, the Ingalls Rink is without a doubt one of Yale’s most important examples of post-war modernist architecture. While the average hockey rink is more of a shed than anything else, this rink’s swooping roof seems to echo the movement of skaters, while providing seats for 3,000 spectators in a remarkably intimate setting. Of course, Ingalls is an oddly located building, and does not make much of an attempt to fit in with its residential and academic neighbors. A comprehensive renovation, set for completion in 2010 and overseen by Saarinen’s former deputy, Kevin Roche, promises to restore Ingalls to its original splendor and accommodate new programmatic needs.

Kline Biology Tower, 1965

Philip Johnson Associates Philip Johnson (1906-2005, D.F.A., Honorary, 1978)

The Kline Biology Tower, Yale’s tallest building, sits at the top of Science Hill. At 14 stories, the tower may be too tall, but Johnson’s design is masterful in its aesthetic connection with buildings centuries older on campus. Indeed, the handling of the brick and brownstone of Kline ties it — in color and, to some extent, in shape — to Sturgis’s work on the Old Campus and other surrounding structures. Johnson was also responsible for the Kline Geology Building and the extension to the Chemistry Building, weaving these together with earlier buildings to define one of Yale’s most masterful courtyards.

Sterling Divinity Quadrangle, 1932, 2003

Delano & Aldrich William Adams Delano (1874 – 1960, B.A. 1899, M.A., Honorary, 1939)  Restoration and renovation by Kliment & Halsband Robert Kliment (b. 1933, B.A. 1954, M.ARCH, 1959)

The Sterling Divinity Quadrangle, sitting at the extreme northern end of Yale’s campus and commanding a high site on Prospect Street, is Delano and Aldrich’s interpretation of Jefferson’s University of Virginia Campus, employing a red-brick Georgian style for buildings around a large lawn. At the head of the lawn and the site’s highest point, where Jefferson had located a library, sits the Marquand Chapel. Threatened with demolition in the 1990s, the quadrangle was renovated in 2003.

Yale Psychiatric Institute, 1989

Frank O. Gehry (b. 1929, D.F.A., Honorary, 2000) Note: There is no public access to this building.

The Yale Psychiatric Institute, Frank Gehry’s only design at Yale, was realized on a very tight budget and awkward site. The complex, now known as the Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital, gives off the impression of a village of small buildings grouped around a courtyard. While the Institute’s windows are square and plain, the buildings themselves are a study in geometry and materiality. A copper arc tops the complex, covering a gym; brick and stucco finishes cover wings that jut out at irregular angles. Designed to meet the needs of 66 adolescent patients, the Institute sits at the edge of the Medical School’s campus, near to the Hill neighborhood of New Haven.

Credit to those that made this gallery possible: Text: Paul Needham Editor: Robert A.M. Stern Photography: Michael Marsland Design: Nicholas Appleby

Special thanks to: Leo Stevens, Barbara Shailor, John Jacobson, Lesley Baier.

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Yale University Visitors Center

City: new haven.

Yale College students provide a glimpse into the history and architecture of the university. The tours start at the Yale Visitor Center at 149 Elm Street . Hear about Yale’s rich 300-year history and aspects of student life at several of Yale’s fourteen residential colleges. The tour also includes the Gothic Sterling Memorial Library, Yale’s largest, and the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Constructed with more than one hundred panels of translucent marble, the Beinecke is home to one of the world’s preeminent collections of rare materials, including the Gutenberg Bible.

Tours last approximately one hour. Note that there are many Elm Streets in the region. The exact address is 149 Elm Street New Haven, CT 06511. Please check you are using the correct zip code 06511 .

Register for a Visitor Center Tour (registration is required)

Please note that the Visitor Center provides campus tours that are geared toward a broad audience of visitors. Undergraduate Admissions provides separate tours. If you are a prospective undergraduate student, you should consider attending an Undergraduate Admissions tour.

Kids’ Architectural Treasure Hunt

Parents taking the campus tour with children ages 6-11 can request a brochure that encourages the children to hunt for architectural details and designs.

address

James Pierpont House, 149 Elm St, New Haven, CT 06511, USA

phone

203-432-2300

website

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Yale Campus Tours: All Your Options on How to Tour Yale University

(Updated October 2022, Originally Posted March 2021) Whether you’re visiting New Haven as a tourist or as a prospective student, touring Yale’s incredible campus in the heart of the city is one of the best (and free) activities to do here. Catch a glimpse into what life is like as a student at this world-class institution and soak in the bustling atmosphere of thriving campus life.  Yale’s official campus tours are the perfect opportunity to find out what student life is like, what campus clubs are available and what special features each college has to offer.

Here are 4 key pieces of advice for taking a tour at Yale University:

  • Get there early to ensure you have a spot on the tour!
  • Dress appropriately for outdoor touring.
  • Go to the restrooms in the Visitor Center or the Office of Undergraduate Admissions before your tour begins. The 60-75 minute tours don’t have pit stops!
  • Speak to your student guides. They are super friendly and are happy to answer your questions about their experiences.

student tours of Yale

Tour as a prospective student

Take in the sights of Yale’s campus through the eyes of a residing student and see if you can imagine yourself becoming one! September through May, Monday through Saturday, you can tour the residential colleges, libraries, green spaces and historical landmarks all while chatting with your student guide.

The university also offers specialized science and engineering tours that are led by students studying in those fields. Find out about the exciting programs, projects and research currently taking place in their labs.

All the sessions for prospective Yalies start at the Office of Undergraduate Admissions (38 Hillhouse Ave). If you’re walking there from New Haven Green, stop at the Blue State Coffee on Wall Street, a student hot spot opposite Silliman College, for a drink to go!

Alongside tours, there are many admissions events that you can join throughout the year including visiting a class and requesting an on-campus interview. Check out the admissions website for schedules and registration.

tours of yale university

Tour as a visitor

From the Visitor Center on one side of New Haven Green (149 Elm Street), you can take your spot on one of the campus tours.  The tour starts with a very informative and playful video that gives a broad overview of what this university has to offer its students.  This 60-minute walking tour covers central campus and shares plenty of interesting details about Yale’s 300-year history as well as what life is like through the eyes of the student guide. Take a look in one of the 14 residential colleges, the impressive record-breaking libraries and walk the paths previously taken by Yale’s many famous alumni.

One of the best parts of the walking tours is getting to hear from the student guides!  Take advantage of your time to ask them questions and hear about their classes, extra-curriculars and student life in New Haven. Wondering where to go next for a snack or directions around the downtown area? Your guide will be happy to help!

tours of yale university

Tours during the current COVID pandemic (updated July 2022)

Yale University once again offers in person tours! COVID-19 vaccination is required for visitors 5 and older.

You can book a tour online to register for a campus tour.

Whether it’s in person or virtual, Yale University is an impressive place to visit. When you get the chance, I highly recommend enjoying the sights in person! Even if it’s not through an official tour, Yale’s campus is a beautiful place to walk through all year round.

tours of yale university

Frequently Asked Questions About Touring Yale University

Can i visit yale as a tourist, is the yale tour accessible, how much does it cost to go on the yale tour, does yale university offer virtual tours, can you walk around yale campus, does yale offer a self guided tour.

Please note: This post is for informational purposes only. Yale Tours are handled by Yale University and are subject to change according to the season. Please visit their website (listed above) if there is any questions.

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History Travel + Local Experiences

July 27, 2022 By Lyndsay

24+ Incredible Things to do Around Yale University

  • 1.1 Take a tour of the historic Yale University
  • 1.2 Explore prehistoric fossils at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History
  • 1.3 Admire the Collegiate Gothic-style architecture of Yale University’s Sterling Memorial Library
  • 1.4 Marvel at the rare works inside the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
  • 1.5 Explore the galleries at the Yale Center for British Art
  • 1.6 Find your next favorite read at the Atticus Bookstore Café
  • 1.7 Explore the Yale University Art Gallery
  • 1.8 Pay your respects at the Grove Street Cemetary
  • 1.9 Marvel at a performance by the Yale Repertory Theatre
  • 1.10 Visit the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments
  • 1.11 Cheer on the Bulldogs
  • 1.12 Wonder about what’s inside the Skull and Bones Tomb
  • 1.13 Watch the bells chime on a tour inside Harkness Tower
  • 1.14 View human brains at the Cushing Brain Collection
  • 1.15 Learn about outer space at the Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium
  • 1.16 Wander through The Shops at Yale
  • 2.1 Attend a true Compline Mass
  • 2.2 Visit Lighthouse Point Park
  • 2.3 Take over a booth inside one of New Haven’s top apizza places
  • 2.4 Try local brews at one of New Haven’s breweries
  • 2.5 Play all different kinds of board games at Elm City Games
  • 2.6 Catch a concert at the Westville Bowl or College Street Music Hall
  • 2.7 Head to Toad’s Place for live music
  • 2.8 Let your introvert thrive at the Graduate’s Silent Book Club

This post may contain affiliate links! I will receive a commission, at no extra cost to you, if you purchase something recommended here.

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Founded in 1701, Yale University is the third-oldest University in America. The University is known for its academic excellence, research, and strong tradition of independence and freedom of thought.

The Yale University campus covers over 300 acres and includes over 100 buildings throughout New Haven, Connecticut.

With so much history surrounding the University and weaving into the city of New Haven, there are some absolutely incredible things to do near Yale University that you need to discover.

Whether you’re a Yalie or just visiting the Elm City, there are so many fascinating things to do around Yale University that the public can access. Here’s your chance to discover one of the most prestigious universities in the world.

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Things to do Around Yale University

Take a tour of the historic yale university.

tours of yale university

The Ivy League university is an institution in New Haven, Connecticut. Yale University was founded in the 1640s by colonial clergymen who wanted to build a school in the European tradition.

In 1718, it was formally called Yale College after Elihu Yale, a Welsh businessman and supporter of the school. It is the third-oldest University in the United States, after only Harvard University and the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia .

Yale has produced countless renowned graduates and has been a site of tremendous intellectual study and accomplishment throughout its history.

Visitors can walk the campus at their leisure. Still, they can also enjoy a free tour of the historic campus given by current students.

The tour departs daily from the Visitor Center, located just across from the New Haven Town Green. The campus architecture is stunning, and a stroll around the storied academic grounds is a must. You can also sign up for an online free virtual, interactive campus tour.

Explore prehistoric fossils at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

This is an image of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven, Connecticut. 

Looking for dinosaur-related activities in New Haven? The Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale University is a fantastic place to visit.

The natural history museum, founded in 1866, houses numerous world-renowned permanent collections. The most famous is found in The Great Hall of Dinosaurs. It has several skeletons, including a mounted Brontosaurus skeleton and Rudolph Zallinger’s The Age of Reptiles mural.

On Saturdays and Sundays, tours of several interactive exhibitions are included with your entrance ticket.

Admire the Collegiate Gothic-style architecture of Yale University’s Sterling Memorial Library

This is an image of the Yale University campus. Looking for things to do in New Haven, Connecticut? If you're planning to visit this historic city or one of its many colleges, here's your 3-day itinerary!

The Sterling Memorial Library is another iconic building on the Yale University campus. Also known as Cross Campus Library, the school’s primary library location is home to more than 2.5 million books across its sixteen floors.

The library opened in 1931 and is named after John W. Sterling, a lawyer. He donated over $17 million to the University to construct a needed building. James Gamble Rogers, also the architect of Harkness Tower, designed the building to be reminiscent of a European Gothic-style cathedral.

Although public tours inside the library are currently suspended, you can listen to a podcast produced by the Yale Library to learn all about the rich history and artifacts found inside the historic building.

Marvel at the rare works inside the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

This is an image of Beinecke-Rare-Book-Manuscript-Library at Yale University. Looking for things to do in New Haven, Connecticut? If you're planning to visit this historic city or one of its many colleges, here's your 3-day itinerary!

With over one million total volumes, Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library is one of the world’s largest collections of rare books and manuscripts.

Since its inception in 1963, the library has amassed some of the very first editions of the United States Declaration of Independence, John James Audubon’s Birds of America, and Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

The structure itself sits next to the Sterling Memorial Library and lacks windows; instead, opaque pieces of Vermont marble serve as windows. Sunlight penetrates through them to reach the literary archives, protecting the valuable materials.

Access to the archives is restricted to researchers and Yale members. However, several special exhibitions are open to the public, like the University library’s first volumes going back to 1742 and the Gutenberg Bible.

Explore the galleries at the Yale Center for British Art

This is a sign at the entrance of the ale center for British art in New Haven Connecticut

Another thing to do around Yale is the Yale Center for British Art, which holds the most extensive collection of British art outside of the United Kingdom.

Its enormous collection includes thousands of works by artists dating from the 1400s to the present day, ranging from paintings, sculptures, and pictures to scholarly volumes on the history of British art. Among its permanent exhibitions are some works by Americans who lived in Britain during the period.

While alumnus Paul Mellon bequeathed the permanent collection to Yale in 1966, the sustainable structure that houses the University art museum was designed and erected by Louis I. Kahn in 1977, directly across the street from the Yale University Art Gallery.

Public tours of the paintings, special exhibits, and architecture are available, as is a research program that includes lectures, conferences, and workshops. They also have an app that can be used inside the museum or at home and acts as a guide to its artworks.

And, admission to the Yale Center for British Art is free, making it an excellent indoor activity for rainy or cold days in New Haven .

Find your next favorite read at the Atticus Bookstore Café

This is an image of the entrance sign on the window of the Atticus bookstore café in New Haven Connecticut.

You can discover both great food and your new favorite novel without leaving the Atticus Bookstore Café .

Their first location opened on the ground floor of the Yale British Art Museum in 1975. You can browse classics, new releases, staff picks, and their excellent food and pastries.

They’ve now grown to include the Atticus Market in New Haven’s East Rock area and the original café.

Explore the Yale University Art Gallery

This is an image of the entrance to the Yale University Art Gallery in New Haven, Connecticut.

On the other side of Chapel Street from the Yale Center for British Art, the Yale University Art Gallery has over 300,000 works in its collection. Its mission is to protect and showcase all different forms of artwork from any period.

Since its founding in 1832, it’s known as the oldest university art museum in the United States. You can tour its collection and participate in any of its events free.

Pay your respects at the Grove Street Cemetary

This is the entrance to Grove Street Cemetery in New Haven, Connecticut.

Grove Street Cemetery, located next to the Yale campus, is the final resting place of some of New Haven’s most notable former inhabitants, including Connecticut inventor Eli Whitney, who created the cotton gin.

After the old New Haven Town Green cemetery became overcrowded, it was constructed in the 1790s as the country’s first registered burial grounds.

The cemetery’s entry gate, regarded as an outstanding example of Egyptian Revival architecture, is notable. It’s a peaceful, historic place full of incredible monuments.

Marvel at a performance by the Yale Repertory Theatre

This is the entrance of the Yale repertory theater in New Haven Connecticut.

Yale Rep is the professional-in-residence company at Yale School of Drama–one of the most highly regarded theatre programs in the United States–and has earned a Tony Award for Excellence in Regional Theatre.

Since its debut in 1966, they’ve had seventeen productions transferred to Broadway and premiered over 100 new works.

Visit the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments

This is the entrance to the Yale Collection of Musical Instruments in New Haven, Connecticut.

The Yale Collection of Musical Instruments, established in 1900, is a fascinating museum inside the Yale University system. The Yale School of Music’s museum has musical instruments dating back over three centuries.

Among the special instruments on display are a 1742 organ by John Snetzler, a 1784 clavichord by Hoffman, and pianos by Könnicke dating back to 1795.

Every year, the museum puts on a historically accurate concert with instruments from its collection. During admission hours, you can explore their permanent and temporary exhibitions; however, the museum is now closed for restoration.

Cheer on the Bulldogs

This is an image of the entrance to the Yale Bowl at Sunset in New Haven Connecticut.

If you’re looking for some of the best things to do around Yale University, you can’t miss an opportunity to cheer on the Bulldogs!

The Yale football team plays at the Yale Bowl, while the Yale mens’ and womens’ hockey teams play at the Ingalls Ice Rink. Tickets for these three teams can be purchased on their respective websites.

Fun Fact : Due to stadium renovations, the Giants NFL football team used the Yale Bowl as their home facility for twelve games from 1973 to 1974.

Wonder about what’s inside the Skull and Bones Tomb

tours of yale university

First of all, this is not a functioning mausoleum on the Yale University campus.

Secret Societies are to Ivy League universities as fraternities and sororities are to other American colleges.

The Skull and Bones Society at Yale is one of the most famous, with numerous influential people, including three past United States presidents making up its former members.

The Skull and Bones Tomb is the society’s headquarters. Although you can’t go inside to see the secrets for yourself, you can pass the building from the outside on High Street and…wonder.

Watch the bells chime on a tour inside Harkness Tower

tours of yale university

Harkness Tower is one of the most recognizable landmarks in New Haven and around Yale.

Built from 1917 to 1922 and designed by architect and Yale College student James Gamble Rogers, the masonry tower stands 216 feet tall with nine floors and 284 steps to reach the top. Four open-faced clocks face outwards to tell the time, while the carillon bells sit directly behind them.

The Yale University Guild of Carillonneurs offers free tours inside Harkess Tower to watch as they play the bells. You can request to sign up for a tour on their website .

View human brains at the Cushing Brain Collection

Ever been interested in human brains? The Cushing Center at Yale’s Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library shows more than 400 human brain specimens on display.

The collection was established at the turn of the 20th century when neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing pioneered diagnoses and procedures to treat brain tumors and other ailments.

In 2010, the collection was finally given a permanent home in the Whitney Medical Library at Yale University. You can register for a tour of the exhibits and find more information for prospective visitors on their website .

Learn about outer space at the Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium

tours of yale university

Did you know–Yale University was one of the first institutions for astronomical observation? Yale’s history of studying the stars extends all the way back to the late 1820s, when the College received a donation for the purchase of a Dolland refracting telescope.

Since then, the University has been observing outer space. Renamed the Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium in 2008, the center is open to public stargazing one night a week, as long as the skies are clear. You can check their Twitter account for up-to-date information on whether they’ll be open this week.

The Observatory also hosts Planetarium shows; you can find out more on their website and watch past performances on their YouTube channel .

Wander through The Shops at Yale

This is an image of the sign at the entrance to the shops at Yale New Haven Connecticut.

The Shops at Yale are located just around the corner from the Yale University campus. This upscale outdoor shopping area features a diverse selection of over sixty major brands and local merchants.

They also have different restaurants, ranging from quick bites and snacks to upscale dining. It’s a great place to spend a fall day or winter afternoon in New Haven.

Things to do Near Yale University

Attend a true compline mass.

This is the entrance to Christ Church in New Haven, Connecticut.

You can attend a true Compline mass at Christ Church near the Shops at Yale throughout the academic year on Sunday nights.

Beginning at 9 p.m., the Christ Church choir sings traditional songs from a hidden location within the historic church. At the same time, the entire interior is lit by candlelight.

Compline – also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian tradition of canonical hours, which are prayed at fixed prayer times…In Western Christianity, Compline tends to be a contemplative office that emphasizes spiritual peace. In most monasteries it is the custom to begin the “Great Silence” after compline, during which the whole community, including guests, observes silence throughout the night until after the Terce the next day. “ Compline .” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 8 Mar. 2022.

Visit Lighthouse Point Park

This is an image of Five Mile Point Lighthouse in New Haven, Connecticut.

Lighthouse Point Park is one of the best beaches in New Haven . It’s a beautiful park with stunning views; you can swim in the water, walk along the nature trails, and have a picnic in the designated picnic area.

Aside from the beach, Lighthouse Point Park also features a working turn-of-the-20th-century carousel and the Five Mile Point Lighthouse, which was erected in 1805 and deactivated in 1877. Morris Creek Nature Preserve, a 20-acre salt marsh, is located adjacent to the park.

Although parking here is free for New Haven residents, if you live out of the city, parking costs $25 a day.

You’ll also have to leave your four-legged companions home because dogs are not permitted at Lighthouse Point Park.

Take over a booth inside one of New Haven’s top apizza places

This is an image of the front of Frank Pepe's Pizza in New Haven, Connecticut.

One of the best things to do near Yale is sit down and enjoy one of New Haven’s best-kept secrets –apizza.

Apizza is a New Haven version of Neapolitan pizza with a thin, crunchy crust and a chewy inside. Because of the similarities, it is sometimes linked to New York-style pizza. However, the apizza style can be traced back to early 1900s Italian immigrants who resided in New Haven, Connecticut.

Today, the city’s unique pizza culture is thriving, with dozens of restaurants specializing in apizza. Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana and Sally’s Apizza (both on Wooster Street in the center of New Haven’s Little Italy) and Modern Apizza are two pizzerias that sell apizza. At the same time, BAR ( one of the state’s best breweries ) puts a modern spin on the style.

Insider Tip : Grab a bottle of Foxon Park soda to compliment your apizza. The East Haven soda company is well-known for its birch beer flavor, which you won’t want to miss!

Try local brews at one of New Haven’s breweries

Other than BAR, there are several other breweries in New Haven worth visiting on a night out .

East Rock Brewing Company enjoys producing “clean and crisp German-inspired beer.” Named after the neighborhood and nearby East Rock Park, they pride themselves on carrying on the German history found in this area of New Haven.

Inside their Beer Hall, you’ll find a range of year-round brews and seasonal offerings. They also host their own trivia theme nights at least once a month, with themes ranging from Schitt’s Creek to video games to baseball.

You can find their beer release calendar and their calendar of events featuring their upcoming Trivia night topics on their website.

Other excellent New Haven-based breweries include Armada Brewing, Overshores Brewing Co in East Haven, and New England Brewing Company in Woodbridge.

Play all different kinds of board games at Elm City Games

This is an image of the entrance to Elm city games in New Haven Connecticut.

This New Haven game shop and library is one of the most fun things to do near Yale University. It’s home to over 1,500 games where you can sit down and play tabletop board games, card games, and dice matches.

A day pass costs only $10 and includes access to all games in their shop.

You’ll almost certainly discover many more choices than traditional favorites like Monopoly, Sorry, or Chutes and Ladders. You can buy any game in the store.

Catch a concert at the Westville Bowl or College Street Music Hall

This is the entrance to the Westville bowl in New Haven Connecticut.

Across the street from the Yale Bowl, you’ll find the Westville Bowl. However, instead of football, this stadium caters to concerts and comics. The venue is open to all ages (unless a performance specifically states otherwise) and has accessible seating.

On their website, you can find out about upcoming performances at the Westville Bowl, purchase tickets, and learn more about their parking situation.

Catching concert performances at College Street Music Hall is another one of the best things to do in New Haven . This live music venue is a restored 1926 theater that now hosts at least one concert every week. Find their upcoming concert schedule here .

Head to Toad’s Place for live music

This is the sign above the entrance to Toad's Place in New Haven, Connecticut.

Toad’s Place has been a popular music venue and nightclub in New Haven, Connecticut, for decades–my father still rocks his vintage Toad’s Place t-shirts from when he regularly caught concerts here in College!

Check out their website to see what type of show you might enjoy most, and purchase tickets through their box office in person, over the phone, or online.

Let your introvert thrive at the Graduate’s Silent Book Club

This is the entrance to a bar in New Haven Connecticut.

Every week, the Graduate Hotel hosts a silent book club evening in their Old Heidelberg bar area.

There’s no need to read your novel ahead of time or have a half-hearted discussion on character motivation. This is a safe space where you can relax in solitude with a book and a drink.

The hotel also hosts a weekly trivia night in the Old Heidelberg bar.

There are so many fun things to do near Yale University for local college students and people interested in learning more about the school’s history–and we haven’t even started on all of the interesting day trips nearby !

What are your favorite things to do around Yale?

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Campus Tours

General tours of the West Campus are offered through the Yale Visitor Center. For more information, please visit the Yale Visitor Center .

For VIP and Development tours, please email West Campus Administration .

These special-request tours leave from the West Campus Visitor Center, 100 West Campus Drive, Orange, CT. Parking is available.

Take a Virtual Tour of West Campus

Yale Daily News

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Yale creates new ways to tour campus

Staff Reporter

tours of yale university

Anvay Tewari

With updated online virtual tours and the creation of a new smartphone tour app, there are now more ways to explore Yale than ever before, both on campus and from the comfort of one’s own home.

Originally created in 2011, the virtual tours allow people to see Yale’s campus, halls, dorm rooms and facilities online while learning about these campus fixtures from friendly, virtual tour guides. There are five tours available, showcasing the campus in general, residential colleges, athletic facilities, engineering offerings and science facilities and research opportunities. Aside from the athletic one, all tours were updated this summer with new photographs, new locations and little tweaks to the tour guides’ scripts.

The campus tour app that rolled out this summer, called “Yale Admissions Campus Tour,” allows visitors on campus to learn more about Yale even if they cannot join an official tour. The smartphone tracks where visitors are on campus and provides information about different locations, allowing visitors to explore Yale at their own pace. It features all the stops of the University-run on-campus tour and even includes the new residential colleges, which have not yet been added to the on-campus tour.

“The virtual tour and app are a wonderful way for visitors from around the world to learn more about our campus and get a glimpse of student life at Yale,” said Nancy Franco, the director of the Yale Visitor Center. “Although we offer daily tours, it may not be practical for everyone to make a visit to New Haven.”

The new virtual tour features many locations that had not been built by 2011 and others that have been heavily renovated since then, said Director of Outreach and Communications Mark Dunn. These locations include Evans Hall, which houses the School of Management and was completed in 2014, and the Yale Quantum Institute, established in 2015.

Dunn added that he was particularly excited about showing the Yale University Art Gallery and Yale Center for British Art, as both grew in size and underwent significant changes since the last tour’s debut. The tour also showcases other facilities not previously included, such as the Leitner Family Observatory and Planetarium.

The changes to the virtual tour guides’ scripts consisted mostly of replacing outdated information, such as the number of residential colleges and the title “master,” as well as adding some new information, particularly to the Science and Engineering tours, Dunn said.

“It was really a good chance for us to review what was [in the tours] to make sure we were showcasing the most exciting spaces and stories on campus right now,” Dunn said.

The new smartphone app features both written and audio descriptions of various sites at Yale, such as Old Campus and Sterling Memorial Library. Dunn said that because some locations — the residential colleges, for instance — might be locked when visitors decide to take the self-guided tour, the app also includes some photos of the interiors of each featured campus space. The app is designed to allow users to “be in the public spaces around campus” and still be able to learn more about them, he added.

In the past, Dunn said, if visitors wanted to tour campus on their own, or simply could not make it to a scheduled tour, all Yale could provide them was a map.

The smartphone tour app and the virtual tour have one important thing in common with the on-campus tour — both are narrated by Yale’s student guides.

“It was so exciting for me to have students be featured in both of these experiences,” Dunn said. “They really are what sets Yale apart and what really connects with prospective students more than anything else.”

Leah Surrat ’18, the narrator of the virtual engineering tour, said the engineering tour she attended when she visited campus before her first year was one of the main reasons she chose to come to Yale, so it was nice to be able to share her experience with others and represent the tour guide program.

Stephanie Spear ’19, who narrated the science tour, said it was a great idea to update the tour to keep up with the changes in campus’s facilities.

“It’s actually quite surreal to think that I am the person prospective applicants will be seeing and hearing when they go learn more about science at Yale,” Spear said. “I feel really honored to be able to represent our school in this way and hope that I can do a good job of convincing prospective students to apply.”

More than 500,000 unique visitors have gone through Yale’s virtual tours since 2011.

Anastasiia Posnova  | [email protected]

At home, abroad, working, interning?  Wherever you are this summer, contact OCS or make an appointment for a virtual advising session. We are available all summer! 

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tours of yale university

Yale Department of Computer Science Career Fair – September 20th, 2024, from 1-3PM

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The Yale Computer Science Career Fair will be held at the Old Refectory, inside the Yale Divinity School (409 Prospect Street) . Students will drop in throughout the event to engage in conversations about opportunities at your organization, questions on how to apply, and much more. More details on the event and the Department of Computer Science.

Employer Registration

Please reach out to  [email protected]  with any questions.

Office of Career Strategy

Visiting yale.

tours of yale university

The elite New England university where J.D. Vance graduated also produced these presidents, VPs

Former President Donald Trump has selected Ohio Republican Sen. J.D. Vance as his running mate for the 2024 presidential election.

If Trump and Vance do win this November, it won't be the first time that a graduate of New England's elite Yale University became vice president.

Both former presidents and vice presidents of the United States have graduated from Yale as undergrads or, like Vance, from Yale Law School.

When did J.D. Vance go to Yale Law School?

Vance attended Yale Law from 2010 to 2013 after graduating from Ohio State University with a degree in political science and philosophy.

He would go on to write and publish the best-selling memoir "Hillbilly Elegy" in 2016, later becoming the junior senator of the state of Ohio, where he grew up.

Other presidential Yale graduates

The Ivy League Yale University has produced six other former presidents or vice presidents of the United States, going all the way back to the 1800's.

Here's the list:

John C. Calhoun (Class of 1804)

John C. Calhoun , who would go on to serve as vice president under John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson, entered Yale College – as the undergraduate program was known at that time – in 1802 and graduated in 1804.

William Howard Taft (Class of 1878)

William Howard Taft, the Ohio Republican who would become the 27th President of the United States and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, went to Yale College and graduated second in his class in 1878.

Taft was also part of the Yale secret society known as Skull and Bones , which his father helped form.

Gerald Ford (Yale Law, 1941)

Before serving in the U.S. Navy during World War 2 and becoming the 38th U.S. president, Gerald Ford graduated from Yale Law School in 1941.

Ford was also an assistant coach of the Yale football team while pursuing his law degree.

George H.W. Bush (Class of 1948)

George H.W. Bush , who would later become the 41st U.S. president, graduated from Yale University in 1948.

During his time at Yale, George H.W. Bush was also the third baseman and a captain of the Yale Bulldogs , the school's baseball team. He was also in the Skull and Bones secret society.

Bill Clinton (Yale Law, 1973)

The 42nd president of the United States, Bill Clinton went to Yale Law School and graduated in 1973.

Yale Law is also where Clinton would meet his future wife, Hillary Rodham.

George W. Bush (Class of 1968)

George W. Bush, the 43rd U.S. president, began attending Yale University in 1964. He would graduate in 1968 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history. 

Like his father, George H.W. Bush, and grandfather, George W. Bush was a cheerleader at Yale, having begun his cheer career in high school. He was also a member of the Skull and Bones secret society.

Rin Velasco is a trending reporter. She can be reached at [email protected]

This article originally appeared on wickedlocal.com: The elite New England university where J.D. Vance graduated also produced these presidents, VPs

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In the Wake of the Chevron Decision

YSE and Yale faculty experts discuss the potential impacts of the Supreme Court's recent Chevron decision  — on environmental regulations, ESG, and efforts to combat climate change.

  Listen to Article

Last month, in a decision that is likely to have far-reaching impacts, the Supreme Court eliminated a 40-year-old legal precedent known as the “Chevron doctrine.” In the 6-3 ruling issued in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo, the justices overruled their landmark 1984 decision in Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council. Under the Chevron doctrine, if Congress had not directly addressed the question at the center of a dispute, a court was required to uphold the agency’s interpretation of the statute as long as it was reasonable. The decision, many legal and environmental experts say, could greatly affect everything from  environmental rules that aim to limit air and water pollution, safeguard people from the harms of toxic chemicals, protect endangered species, advance the transition to clean energy, and tackle climate change. With time for reflection, faculty experts from the Yale School of the Environment, the School of Management, and Yale Law School weigh in on the ruling and its potential impact on the environment and corporate sustainability efforts.

Unleashing an unprecedented level of uncertainty into the regulatory arena

Daniel Esty - Hillhouse Professor of Environmental Law and Policy

By overturning the Chevron principle of reasonable (and limited!) deference to federal agencies in rulemaking, the Supreme Court has knocked out a core pillar of American administrative law and created a real risk of regulatory chaos across a range of policy domains, including environmental protection, health care, labor standards, land use, and corporate reporting. In eliminated a long-established policymaking framework and providing almost no guidance for courts to apply in determining whether agencies have acted reasonably in implementing the legislation adopted by the Congress and signed into law by the president, the court may well have unleashed an unprecedented level of uncertainty into the regulatory arena. The chaos that will result as lower courts pass judgment individually on regulations in areas that are often quite technical and in which the judges involved often lack any expertise will translate into risk and cost for all regulated parties and impose, in effect, an uncertainty tax on businesses large and small, which will spillover onto every American.

The chaos that will result as lower courts pass judgment individually on regulations in areas that are often quite technical, and in which the judges involved often lack any expertise, will translate into, in effect, ... an uncertainty tax on businesses large and small, which will spillover onto every American.”

Shifting the responsibility for addressing complex scientific questions

Shimon Anisfeld - Senior Lecture and Research Scientist, Water Resources and Environmental Chemistry, Yale School of the Environment

Modern water-quality regulation — under both the Clean Water Act (protecting our rivers and lakes) and the Safe Drinking Water Act (protecting the water we drink) — involves complex scientific questions of toxicology, risk, and environmental fate. This unfortunate SCOTUS decision shifts the responsibility for addressing these questions from EPA professionals to ill-equipped courts and will hamstring the EPA’s ability to protect water quality. Critical regulations to protect our water from emerging contaminants such as PFAS (“forever chemicals”) — which already take far too long to pass and implement — are likely to be slowed even further by a wave of litigation.

This unfortunate SCOTUS decision shifts the responsibility for addressing these questions from EPA professionals to ill-equipped courts and will hamstring the EPA’s ability to protect water quality.”

The ‘push and pull’ of ESG

Todd Cort - Senior Lecturer in Sustainability, Yale School of Management and Faculty Co-Director, Yale Center for Business and the Environment

Progress by corporations on ESG is a matter of ‘push and pull.’ There is the ‘push’ of regulations and liability for failing to meet expectations of minimal acceptable performance. The court opinion to throw out the Chevron rule will make it difficult for regulators in the U.S. to maintain that baseline of performance expectation. But it will not completely hollow out the bottom because most large companies have to comply in more countries than just the United States, and it is generally easier for companies to have one approach to ESG rather than strong practices in one area and weak practices in another. Whenever poor practice creates harm, there is also the threat of liability from other stakeholders. It is not good that the Chevron rule has been removed, but it will not pull the rug out from under ESG either.

At the same time, there is also a ‘pull’ on companies to pursue ESG. The pull of shareholder capital, the pull of customer expectations, the pull of employees that want to work for responsible companies. These pulls vary in strength and stakeholder for different companies, but they are real and can sometimes be quite compelling. The Chevron ruling won’t impact these because these stakeholders that exert a pull are motivated by more than short-term cost savings.

At the same time, there is also a ‘pull’ on companies to pursue ESG. The pull of shareholder capital, the pull of customer expectations, the pull of employees that want to work for responsible companies. ... The Chevron ruling won’t impact these because these stakeholders that exert a pull are motivated by more than short-term cost savings.”

Cracking the foundations of federal environmental and public health protections

Robert Klee '99 MEM, '04 JD, '05 PhD - Lecturer, Yale School of the Environment and Managing Director of Clean Energy Programming, Yale Center for Business and the Environment

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Subscribe to “YSE 3”

Biweekly, we highlight three news and research stories about the work we’re doing at Yale School of the Environment.

The decisions in Loper Bright Enterprises and Relentless at the end of the Supreme Court’s term jettisoned a 40-year-old foundational principle of administrative law that judges and courts should defer to the expertise of executive branch administrative agencies in interpreting their governing statutes. Known as “Chevron deference” (from the 1984 case Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc.), this expression of judicial humility recognized that there could be multiple interpretations of an ambiguous statute, and that courts need not substitute their views if an administrative agency chose a reasonable interpretation of its own. Writing for a 6-3 majority in Loper Bright Enterprises, Chief Justice Roberts replaced humility with hubris. Roberts declared that there must always be a “single, best meaning” of a statute, and judges — not agency experts — should have the final say on what’s best for all of us, no matter how complicated or technical the subject matter. This seismic shift resets the balance of power between branches of government (generally favoring the courts) and between regulators and regulated industries (generally favoring the regulated).

But reading Loper Bright Enterprises in conjunction with three other rulings (Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, SEC v. Jarkesy, and Ohio v. EPA) issued at the end of this Supreme Court term reveals how the conservative majority on the Court may have cracked the foundations of federal environmental and public health protections beyond repair.

Instability rather than clarity

Gerald Torres - Professor of Environmental Justice and Professor of Law

The decision in the Loper case overturned a 40-year-old precedent that permitted agencies to resolve statutory ambiguities without excessive judicial oversight as long as the agency interpretation was reasonable. That deference is now gone. It should be noted that reliance on the Chevron doctrine had declined, and the court, in many ways, merely confirmed the emerging law. The difficulty with the decision is that it introduces rules that will likely produce instability rather than the clarity the majority claimed to be providing. While agency interpretations will be considered with appropriate respect, when courts review agency actions, agency determinations will no longer be given the deference they had enjoyed.

Faculty Featured in this Story

Daniel C. Esty

Daniel C. Esty Hillhouse Professor of Environmental Law and Policy, jointly with Yale Law School; Director of the Center for Environmental Law and Policy

Todd Cort

Todd Cort Lecturer in Sustainability

Robert Klee

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Taylor’s Version (of the Law) Rules in Student-Led Course

Grace Kier and Briana Thompson standing in front of a pink and blue background

Hillary Browning ’25 took her first course on trusts, wills, and estates and fell in love.

“I was already interested in tax law, but this was tax law with a touch of family drama and group dynamics,” she said.

Two semesters later, Browning expressed her enthusiasm for the subject with a 21-slide PowerPoint presentation titled “What Taylor Swift Can Teach Us About Estate Planning.”

She had an eager audience for her work: a group of about 15 fellow law students who met weekly by parsing the legal issues raised by pop star’s career and life.

The venue was “The Law and Management of Global Fame,” a spring 2024 reading group centered around Swift and the law. Conceived by students Grace Kier ’25 and Briana Thompson ’25 , the course was based on the premise that a person can be famous enough to influence legal doctrine. Like The Tortured Poets Department , Swift’s album that dropped in April, the reading group was a detailed study of the recording artist’s experience with fame.

Portrait of Hillary Browning in outdoors

Swift’s relevance to the world of copyright law and artists’ rights is well-known. Her rerecording of her first six albums to ensure ownership rights to the new recordings — dubbed “Taylor’s Version” — is the subject of at least one course in U.S. law schools . But the Yale Law School reading group extends to areas of law without an obvious connection to music.

During the semester’s 10 weeks, the group covered copyright infringement and song lyrics, children and contracts in the recording industry, and ticket scalping. By the new album’s release — an occasion students marked with a listening party in Baker Hall — the reading group had also discussed sexual assault and defamation.  

(Reading Groups Fill a) Blank Space

Reading groups at Yale Law School are an opportunity for students to explore topics not covered in other courses. Students work with a faculty member to design a syllabus on their selected subject. A faculty member supervises the group, but students organize the meetings and lead the discussions.

The reading group on Swift grew out of conversations between Kier and Thompson, friends and classmates who had talked about how Swift’s music and celebrity intersected with the law. They decided the topic merited further examination.

“You don’t have to have an opinion on her or have a positive opinion of her to realize that there is a phenomenon there and think that studying that phenomenon is important,” Kier said.  

(A Learning Opportunity) Where Sparks Fly

Sterling Professor of International Law Harold Hongju Koh overheard Kier and Thompson talking about their idea at dinner last fall and soon offered to be the reading group’s faculty sponsor.

“Everything should give you an opportunity to learn about law,” Koh said. “And studying law should be fun, not a chore. So my pedagogical approach has always been that if students are excited about something, that creates a learning opportunity.”

Koh, a leading expert on international law and human rights, said he was dimly aware of Swift at the time. But he did his research. He watched a few videos, listened to some songs, and read media accounts of Swift. He was impressed by Kier and Thompson’s proposed syllabus, which drew from academic journals, the popular press, podcasts, and Swift’s music itself. Statutes and case texts were also woven throughout. Assignments for each meeting averaged about 75 pages, or roughly three hours of reading and listening time, according to the syllabus.

Harold Koh stands smiling in front of a blackboard with his shirtsleeves rolled up

“It made me realize that Taylor Swift is more than just a great performer and songwriter,” Koh said. “She has changed the legal game as well, by how she has taken control of all aspects of her global fame, especially her intellectual property, and integrated all aspects of her public persona to become a cultural phenomenon.”

Kier and Thompson both see connections to Swift in their legal interests. Kier, who has studied U.S.-Russia policy, pointed out that where Swift performs worldwide is in part a reflection of international politics. Thompson is interested in representing survivors of sexual violence and sexual assault; Swift won a well-publicized civil jury trial after suing a former radio host for groping her at a fan event.

When putting together the course outline, Thompson saw it as a chance to discover other areas of the law, like IT and copyright law.  

(Guest Speakers Explain Law) All Too Well

Koh also saw an opening to introduce students to areas of law they may not have otherwise studied by inviting leading practitioners to speak to the group.

Jared Freedman ’97, former Litigation Director of the Recording Industry Association of America, discussed the law and economics of the music streaming business. Peter Carfagna, a sports lawyer and Harvard Law School lecturer whose clients have included LeBron James and Venus and Serena Williams, spoke about the legal challenges presented by global celebrity.

Another hot topic in law also inevitably came up for discussion: artificial intelligence . The technology, which has already prompted recording industry lawsuits, could allow anyone to create Taylor Swift–style songs.

“It raises really interesting questions about art and artistry and what is art and who owns art,” Kier said.

A woman reading a paper scroll while a man looks on. A caption reads "To my children I leave 13 cents"

AI-generated deepfake images of celebrities — which are sometimes pornographic — also cause legal headaches for celebrities like Swift. Ellen P. Goodman, a Rutgers Law professor specializing in information policy law, broached the topic while covering what it means to own one’s name, image, and likeness.

The syllabus also left room for students to lead a class meeting on a topic of their choice. For Browning, that was wills and estates. Her starting point was the music video for Swift’s song “ Anti-Hero .”

“The video is like a mini law school exam hypothetical,” she said.

In the video, an older Swift dreams about her own funeral and will reading, attended by her fictional family. One of her sons accuses a daughter-in-law of killing Swift so she can inherit Swift’s money. Everyone is stunned when the will reveals that Swift has left her fortune to her cats and her sons inherit just 13 cents each.

Among the legal questions the video raises, according to Browning: Can a person inherit money if they kill someone? Can in-laws inherit? Can someone leave money to a cat? And when can a will be contested?

In her presentation, Browning explained that animals cannot inherit but that someone could create a trust to provide for their cats. Swift’s sons might contest the will by arguing that leaving money to cats is a sign of diminished capacity. But Browning concluded that their attempt would likely fail because the standard for capacity to create a will is relatively low.  

Fearless (Teaching)

Matthäus Uitz ’24 LLM was immediately intrigued when he learned about the reading group. His research focuses on the international dimensions of private law, including contract law and intellectual property law — all topics covered in the course. Uitz also admires Swift’s business savvy and feminism.

“Her entrepreneurial brilliance piqued my scholarly interest years ago, because her willingness to question and ultimately break the conventions of established institutions to create space for positive change is a trait that should encourage all aspiring academics to maximize societal welfare through innovation,” he said.

A group of 10 students (some wearing Taylor Swift clothing) pose for a photo on the steps of Taylor Hall.

For Uitz, the reading group was a novel way to explore differences in how the U.S. and the European Union treat certain legal issues. He noticed how the recording industry has often pushed to have intellectual property cases heard in the country music capital of Nashville — even when the facts of a case would not necessarily place it in that city.

“Unlike the legal system of the European Union, the U.S.-American civil procedure laws seem to tolerate forum shopping to a much larger extent,” he said. “This legal gateway to strategic litigation continues to fascinate me.”

Uitz, now in Austria, said the course also showed him something about teaching.

“Our class confirmed my belief that creative approaches to lecturing are essential for motivating students to actively participate in class discussions, which is an observation that will shape my future teaching endeavors back home in Europe,” he said.

Koh agrees that it helps to be inventive, explaining complex legal concepts with athletes like Jackie Robinson (who wore 42, the Federal Rule of Civil Procedure that governs severance and consolidation), songs like “Hit Me with Your Best Shot,” (the policy rationale for the civil procedure doctrine of res judicata ), and films like 12 Angry Men (jury deliberations) and A Few Good Men (military justice and cross examination).

Everything should give you an opportunity to learn about law. And studying law should be fun, not a chore.” —Professor Harold Hongju Koh

Enchanted (with the Law)

Kier and Thompson now hear their legal education at work when they listen to Swift’s music. The song “No Body No Crime,” in which a woman is murdered by a cheating husband? It’s about evidence. The same with “All Too Well,” a rumination on a failed relationship. Thompson listens and wonders if Rule 403 , which guides what evidence should be excluded from federal trials as prejudicial, would apply if the lyrics were testimony.

“She is an ingenious storyteller and that is something I think a lot of lawyers can benefit from,” Kier said. “Artists and storytellers, I think some would argue, are not doing something all too different from what lawyers are doing when they are telling a story, especially in trial setting.”

As for Koh, supervising the reading group might have made him a Swiftie. Outside of the course, he even included a Swift-related hypothetical — about litigation stemming from her global tours, including the Justice Department investigation of Ticketmaster's owner — in his first-year procedure exam.

“The Beatles, Muhammad Ali, Michael Jordan come along maybe once in a decade,” Koh said. “When they explode into our consciousness, we need to study and understand how they achieved it, not simply ignore or mock it. But if this kind of course gets mocked, well, shake it off .”

In the Press

Who is responsible when protests turn violent — a commentary by stephen l. carter ’79, the state of law school diversity in the wake of affirmative action bans, for the rest of the world, the u.s. president has always been above the law — a commentary by oona a. hathaway ’97, cannon’s dismissal of trump case rejects precedents of higher courts, related news.

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Yale Law School Honors Associate Dean Mike Thompson

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Yale Voxtet coached in Scottish and English repertoire by two renowned musicians

After seven June U.K. performances of Bach’s Mass in B Minor with Yale Schola Cantorum, The Yale Voxtet, the ISM’s select group of eight singers who specialize in early music, oratorio, and chamber ensemble, traveled to Scotland to take part in a workshop in Scottish and English repertoire. They were coached by Scottish Soprano, Mhairi Lawson in historical Scottish song, and British conductor and early music expert, Nic McGegan, in repertoire by Handel and Purcell. It was an inspiring experience to work with composers of such renown and with vast knowledge about interpretation and expression.

Following the workshop, the singers enjoyed a tour of Loch Lomond and The Scottish Highlands—a much-needed break after a demanding tour. After returning to the U.S., the Voxtet members are staying busy. Many are singing in early music festivals, summer opera productions, touring with church choirs and ensembles, and competing in choral competitions in the United States and Europe. Learn more about The Voxtet .

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Juneteenth 2024: celebrating the end of slavery in the u.s..

Juneteenth flag with Harkness Tower in the background

On June 19, 1865, Union Army soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, to enforce the freedom of enslaved people there. President Abraham Lincoln had signed the Emancipation Proclamation more than two years earlier, but enslavers in some parts of the country ignored it.

While slavery did not finally end across the United States until the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment on Dec. 6, 1865, June 19 came to be commemorated in many African-American communities as a “second Independence Day.” In 2021 it became a federally recognized U.S. holiday, which Yale honors also.

Here you can find information about Juneteenth and related events happening on and around Yale’s campus, as well as other opportunities and resources to celebrate, reflect, and learn.

Around New Haven

New Haven’s International Festival of Arts and Ideas — in collaboration with partners including Yale University, the Official Juneteenth Coalition of Greater New Haven, and the local Artsucation Academy Network — is hosting several free Juneteenth celebrations and other events for people of all ages:

Friday, June 14, 7 p.m., New Haven Green — The “ Juneteenth Celebration ” will offer a lively musical celebration of liberation and joy by the New Haven All-Stars, featuring The Keepers of the Culture Performing Arts Company, Manny James and Soulclectic, and The Rahsaan Langley Project.

Saturday, June 15, noon, New Haven Green ­— “ Juneteenth Village ,” a family-friendly pop-up festival hosted by the mother-son duo Mama Ngina and Rahsaan Langley, will include games, musical performances, educational presentations, an elder honoring ceremony, and more.

Sunday, June 16, 9:30 a.m., New Haven Green — A “ Juneteenth Bike Tour ” will lead participants on a 12-mile ride showcasing New Haven’s rich community of Black creativity and innovation, past and present. The ride will take in key historical and cultural landmarks where Africans and African Americans have left their imprint on the history of New Haven and beyond. (Registration required.)

Sunday, June 16, 11 a.m., Yale Schwarzman Center, 168 Grove St., lower-level Dance Studio — “ EveryBody Dances with Dr. Hanan Hameen ,” a special presentation of the Yale Schwarzman Center’s weekly dance masterclass series, will explore traditional celebratory Afrodiasporic dances from the Caribbean and West Africa. (Registration required.)

Tuesday, June 18, 11 a.m., New Haven Museum, 114 Whitney Ave. — “ Shining Light on Truth: New Haven, Yale, and Slavery ” offers a guided tour of the New Haven Museum exhibition of the same name, led by co-curator and Beinecke Library staff member Michael Morand. The exhibition complements the publication of the book “ Yale and Slavery: A History ,” authored by Yale historian David W. Blight with the Yale and Slavery Research Project , and draws from the research project’s key findings.   

Wednesday, June 19, noon, New Haven Green — “ Constance Baker Motley Stamp ” invites kids of all ages to join Constance L. Royster and New Haven educator Katlyn Rapini for a moderated Q&A discussing the life of Constance Baker Motley, the first Black female federal judge and a highly accomplished civil rights attorney. The United States Postal Service issued a Forever Stamp in honor of Motley in January as part of its “Black Heritage” series. The Q&A will be followed by a stamp design workshop.

Watch, listen, and read

Explore the history of Juneteenth and the contributions of African Americans, and reflect on the work against racism that still remains, through educational resources curated by the Yale Office of the Secretary and Vice President for University Life .

Belonging at Yale’s “ Focus on Juneteenth ” page offers a collection of events, media, and other opportunities to educate ourselves and continue the fight for justice.

At the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, “ Douglass, Baldwin, Harrington ” — an exhibition on view through Sunday, July 7 — draws from the library’s Walter O. Evans Collection to celebrate three towering figures of Black history, art, and culture: Frederick Douglass, James Baldwin, and Ollie Harrington.

The Beinecke also holds a collection of films on American life in the 1920s recorded by African-American Baptist minister and filmmaker Rev. Solomon Sir Jones. The collection includes remarkable footage of a 1925 parade celebrating Juneteenth in Texas (see below).  The entire collection can be viewed online .

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J.D. Vance’s journey from a ‘Never Trump’ guy to Trump’s VP pick

The announcement caps a meteoric rise for the GOP star who went from Appalachia to the Senate and now is Trump’s second No. 2.

When Donald Trump first ran for president in 2016, one of his steadfast critics within the Republican Party was J.D. Vance — then a young military veteran, Yale Law School graduate and Silicon Valley venture capitalist who in June of that year published “Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis,” about his upbringing in Appalachia and the Rust Belt.

“I can’t stomach Trump,” Vance told NPR that August. “I’m a ‘Never Trump’ guy. I never liked him,” Vance told Charlie Rose in October 2016, weeks before Trump was elected president.

In eight years, everything would change. The best-selling “Hillbilly Elegy” — which depicted Vance’s childhood in a steel mill community in Ohio in a family beset by drug addiction and poverty — became compulsory reading for many seeking to understand Trump’s appeal to the White working-class voters who had helped install him in the Oval Office.

Vance himself would eventually turn to politics, successfully running for Senate in 2022, a remarkable ascendancy for a political newcomer. By then, Vance had already walked back much of his criticism of Trump, defending him as a “great” president and echoing Trump’s false claims about widespread fraud in the 2020 election.

And on Monday, the 39-year-old Vance was announced as Trump’s 2024 running mate , capping a meteoric rise for the GOP star and a complete transformation of the Ohio Republican from one of Trump’s fiercest critics to one of his most loyal allies. Vance strode onto the floor at the Republican National Convention to Merle Haggard’s “America First,” taking so long to shake hands with attendees that the song had to be played twice.

Introducing Vance at the convention, Ohio Lt. Gov. Jon Husted (R) described the vice-presidential pick as a man who would represent Americans with “moral courage, strength and honor.”

“J.D. is a living embodiment of the American Dream. He came from humble beginnings, and even as his life took him to places he might have never imagined, he never forgot where he came from. Ohio values are in his blood,” Huston said.

After breaking with his previous vice president, Mike Pence , over Pence’s refusal to reject the 2020 election results, Trump’s selection of Vance brings the former president a No. 2 who has in recent years demonstrated unflinching loyalty to him. Vance also could hold electoral strength for Trump, shoring up Republicans’ White working-class base in the Upper Midwest, while Vance’s youth is a sharp contrast to the 78-year-old Trump in an election year where voters have voiced concerns about the ages of both President Biden and Trump.

2024 presidential election

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If voters choose the Trump ticket, Vance — who will turn 40 on Aug. 2 — would become the third-youngest vice president at the time of inauguration, as well as one with very little political experience. Vance served as a U.S. Marine from 2003 to 2007 as a combat correspondent, where his responsibilities were akin to a public affairs specialist, gathering information and conducting interviews for the military’s news service.

In 2005, Vance deployed to Iraq for a six-month assignment, where he wrote about the work of fellow service members, like crews for aging Huey helicopters , under the name James D. Hamel, taking the surname of his stepfather at the time. Vance left the Marine Corps as a corporal in September 2007. His awards, including an Iraq campaign medal, achievement and good conduct medals, are typical of enlisted service members at the time.

Vance went on to study political science and philosophy at Ohio State University and graduated from Yale Law School. Afterward, he worked at a large corporate law firm and then as a principal at billionaire Peter Thiel’s investment firm in San Francisco. Vance is married to Usha Chilukuri, a former law school classmate and the daughter of Indian immigrants, and the couple has three children.

He rose to fame in 2016 after the publication of “Hillbilly Elegy,” which was later adapted into a 2020 Netflix movie directed by Ron Howard. As he promoted the book, Vance didn’t mince words about his distaste for Trump.

During his book tour, Vance compared Trump’s candidacy to cultural heroin and told a former roommate that Trump was either a “cynical asshole” or “America’s Hitler,” according to texts shared on social media by the roommate.

In 2019, after the success of his book, Vance returned to Ohio and founded a venture firm. He has hosted or helped organize high-dollar fundraisers for Trump, including one in June hosted by Silicon Valley entrepreneur David Sacks .

His evolution on Trump was perhaps not entirely unpredictable. Even in his 2016 interviews, social media posts and writings that were critical of Trump, Vance often followed up his sentiments by saying he nevertheless understood why White working-class voters would support him. To Rose in 2016, Vance said he felt “elites” directed an attitude of “We told you so” toward White working-class Trump supporters.

“The problem is if you take that attitude as sort of gloating … then you’re playing into the very thing that gave rise to Trump in the first place, which is a feeling that the elites think that they are smarter than you and just think you’re a bunch of idiots,” Vance said then.

In a 2018 print run of “Hillbilly Elegy,” Vance revealed he voted for a third-party candidate in 2016. But while he still had “reservations” about Trump two years into his term, Vance also wrote that there were aspects of his candidacy that had appealed to him, including Trump’s “disdain for the ‘elites’ and criticism of foreign policy blunders in Iraq and Afghanistan” by previous administrations.

“For so many years, I and a few of my intellectual fellow travelers in the Republican Party were telling politicians to make precisely those sorts of arguments,” Vance wrote in 2018. “Yet the populist rhetoric of the campaign hasn’t informed the party’s approach to governing. Unless that changes, I suspect Republicans will pay a heavy political price.”

Trump endorsed Vance — a first-time candidate running in a crowded 2022 Republican primary for U.S. Senate. He dismissed Vance’s past criticisms of him, saying in a statement at the time that the venture capitalist “gets it now, and I have seen that in spades.”

“He is our best chance for victory in what could be a very tough race,” Trump added.

Vance won the primary and the general election, defeating former Democratic congressman Tim Ryan by more than six percentage points. During his term, the Ohio Republican has embraced a more populist direction for the GOP under Trump, vehemently criticizing U.S. aid to Ukraine and becoming one of the most ubiquitous defenders of the former president.

Vance showed his support outside the New York courthouse during Trump’s criminal trial earlier this year and boosted the presumptive GOP presidential nominee in frequent appearances defending him on cable TV. Vance also has grown close with Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., despite a striking contrast in his hardscrabble upbringing to that of the wealthy New York real estate family.

Soon after the shooting Saturday at a Trump campaign rally in Butler, Pa., Vance promptly blamed President Biden’s campaign “rhetoric” for the incident, drawing criticism for escalating the situation before full details had emerged.

Vance has also echoed Trump’s false claims about widespread fraud in the 2020 election and has indicated that he would have taken a different path on Jan. 6 , 2021, than Pence. Vance told ABC News in February that if he had been vice president, he would have allowed Congress to consider fraudulent slates of pro-Trump electors.

Biden’s campaign immediately seized on Vance’s previous remarks to attack Trump’s running mate pick on Monday.

“Donald Trump picked J.D. Vance as his running mate because Vance will do what Mike Pence wouldn’t on January 6: bend over backwards to enable Trump and his extreme MAGA agenda, even if it means breaking the law and no matter the harm to the American people,” Biden campaign chairwoman Jen O’Malley Dillon said in a statement.

Vance would not commit unequivocally to accepting the results of the 2024 election , telling NBC’s “Meet the Press” earlier this month that he would do so “so long as it’s a free and fair election.” In the same interview, he vowed to work with Trump, even if he was not selected as his running mate.

“We’re just trying to work to elect Donald Trump. Whoever his vice president is, he’s got a lot of good people he could choose from,” Vance said. “It’s the policies that worked and the leadership style that worked for the American people. I think we have to bring that back to the White House, and I’m fighting to try to do that.”

Alex Horton and Maegan Vazquez contributed to this report.

Election 2024

Follow live updates from Day 3 of the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee. Catch up on highlights from the second night , where Nikki Haley called for unity and endorsed Donald Trump .

Trump VP pick: Trump has chosen Sen. J.D. Vance of Ohio as his running mate , selecting a rising star in the party and previously outspoken Trump critic who in recent years has closely aligned himself with the former president.

Presidential election polls: Check out The Post’s presidential polling averages of the seven battleground states most likely to determine the outcome of the election.

Key dates and events: Voters in all states and U.S. territories have been choosing their party’s nominee for president ahead of the summer conventions. Here are key dates and events on the 2024 election calendar .

Abortion and the election: Voters in about a dozen states could decide the fate of abortion rights with constitutional amendments on the ballot in a pivotal election year. Biden supports legal access to abortion , and he has encouraged Congress to pass a law that would codify abortion rights nationwide. After months of mixed signals about his position, Trump said the issue should be left to states . Here’s how Biden’s and Trump’s abortion stances have shifted over the years.

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  1. Take a Tour

    Yale College students provide a glimpse into the history and architecture of the university. The tours start at the Yale Visitor Center at 149 Elm Street. Hear about Yale's rich 300-year history and aspects of student life at several of Yale's fourteen residential colleges. The tour also includes the Gothic Sterling Memorial Library, Yale ...

  2. Welcome to the Visitor Center

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    Campus Tours. July. Mon-Fri 9am, 11:30am, 2pm (exc. Jul 4) August. Mon-Fri 9am, 11:30am, 2pm (ends Aug 28) Summer Admissions & Aid Sessions. Starting June 3 all campus tour registrants are invited to join a thirty-minute session on admissions and financial aid led by an admissions officer Monday through Friday at 10:30am and 1pm at SSS Hall ...

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    Yale University is situated 90 minutes from New York in the city of New Haven, Connecticut. Whether you're in town for an admissions information session or simply want to join one of the many activities happening here, we invite you to explore our campus and community. Take a guided tour, attend a concert, or stroll through our scenic and ...

  5. Plan Your Visit

    The Yale Visitor Center is located at 149 Elm Street, across the street from the New Haven Green. Hours: Monday-Saturday: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Guided tours require reservations. The Visitor Center will be closed on Thursday July 4, 2024 (Independence Day) in observance of the official Yale University holiday. View campus map Schedule a tour.

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    Undergraduate Admissions Tours. Undergraduate Admissions Office, 38 Hillhouse Avenue. The Visitor Center provides campus tours that are geared toward a broad audience of visitors. Undergraduate Admissions also provides separate tours. If you are a prospective undergraduate student you should consider attending an Undergraduate Admissions tour.

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    The Yale Office of Undergraduate Admissions and the Yale Visitor Center invite you to take a Campus Tour led by a current Yale student. Tours last approximately one hour and will depart rain or shine. Please note: From June 1 to August 16, Campus Tours depart from SSS Hall, 1 Prospect St. Science Tours and Engineering Tours ( separate ...

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    The Visitor Center welcomes special group tours. There is a charge of $50 per guide and one guide is appropriate for up to 25 people. Groups of 10 or more are required to schedule a private tour. All private tour company groups, regardless of size, are required to schedule a private tour. Please request your tour by calling 203-432-2300.

  10. Visiting Yale

    The Yale Visitor Center, located at 149 Elm Street, offers visitors a glimpse into the history and architecture of the University. Hear about Yale's rich 300-year history and aspects of student life within Yale's twelve residential colleges. International groups can request to have a tour given in a foreign language by contacting the ...

  11. About Us

    About Us. The Yale Visitor Center is the front door of the university and welcomes its visitors from around the world. We are located at 149 Elm Street and are open Monday to Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Visitor Center will be closed on Thursday July 4, 2024 (Independence Day) in observance of the official Yale University holiday.

  12. Architecture of Yale

    Lawrance Hall, 1885-86. Architect: Russell Sturgis, Jr. (1836-1909, M.A., Honorary, 1872) Between 1869 and 1876, Russell Sturgis completed the troika of Durfee Hall, Battell Chapel, and Farnam Hall at the corner of College and Elm Streets. It was fitting, then, that Sturgis was again tapped for Lawrance Hall, completed in 1886 and adjacent to ...

  13. Yale University Visitors Center

    Parents taking the campus tour with children ages 6-11 can request a brochure that encourages the children to hunt for architectural details and designs. James Pierpont House, 149 Elm St, New Haven, CT 06511, USA. 203-432-2300. Yale University Visitors Center tours are a must-see for every visitor to New Haven. Reservations are required.

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    ou toYale University Walking TourWelcome to Yale University! This walking tour will guide you to many historically and architecturally significant sites on. Yale's campus (stops 1-80) and in New Haven (stops a-f). The Central Campus component of the tour begins at the Yal. Visitor Center on Elm Street, across from the New Haven Green. Orig.

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    Yale Tours are handled by Yale University and are subject to change according to the season. Please visit their website (listed above) if there is any questions. New Haven Towers. Leasing 475.251.7451 129 York Street #1-T New Haven, CT 06511. Tours By Appt - Mon-Sat . 11:00am - 6:00pm.

  16. 24+ Incredible Things to do Around Yale University

    Contents. 1 Things to do Around Yale University. 1.1 Take a tour of the historic Yale University; 1.2 Explore prehistoric fossils at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History; 1.3 Admire the Collegiate Gothic-style architecture of Yale University's Sterling Memorial Library; 1.4 Marvel at the rare works inside the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library; 1.5 Explore the galleries at the ...

  17. Campus Tours

    ours. General tours of the West Campus are offered through the Yale Visitor Center. For more information, please visit the Yale Visitor Center. For VIP and Development tours, please email West Campus Administration. These special-request tours leave from the West Campus Visitor Center, 100 West Campus Drive, Orange, CT. Parking is available.

  18. Yale

    This mobile app is intended to offer visitors the opportunity to tour Yale on their schedule, complete with step-by-step walking directions. Please note that Yale Admissions offers free campus tours, departing from the Yale University Vistor Center (149 Elm Street). For a full schedule, please visit the Visitor Info page below to learn if a ...

  19. Yale Undergraduate Admissions

    Campus Visit. To display and register for events, select an available date from the calendar. Prev Next. July 2024. Su. Mo.

  20. Yale creates new ways to tour campus

    Anastasiia Posnova 12:33 am, Oct 31, 2017. Staff Reporter. Anvay Tewari. With updated online virtual tours and the creation of a new smartphone tour app, there are now more ways to explore Yale than ever before, both on campus and from the comfort of one's own home. Originally created in 2011, the virtual tours allow people to see Yale's ...

  21. VIC Tours

    Our student-led tours last approximately one hour and will depart rain or shine. Tours listed here are open to all visitors, but high school students and other prospective undergraduates may prefer a tour hosted by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Visit admissions.yale.edu/tours for times and details.

  22. Yale University Walking Tour (Self Guided), New Haven

    Guide Name: Yale University Walking Tour Guide Location: USA » New Haven (See other walking tours in New Haven) Guide Type: Self-guided Walking Tour (Sightseeing) # of Attractions: 12 Tour Duration: 1 Hour(s) Travel Distance: 1.4 Km or 0.9 Miles Author: AudreyB Sight(s) Featured in This Guide:

  23. Yale Department of Computer Science Career Fair

    The Yale Computer Science Career Fair will be held at the Old Refectory, inside the Yale Divinity School (409 Prospect Street). Students will drop in throughout the event to engage in conversations about opportunities at your organization, questions on how to apply, and much more. More details on the event. Employer Registration

  24. The elite New England university where J.D. Vance graduated also ...

    When did J.D. Vance go to Yale Law School? Vance attended Yale Law from 2010 to 2013 after graduating from Ohio State University with a degree in political science and philosophy.

  25. In the Wake of the Chevron Decision

    The decisions in Loper Bright Enterprises and Relentless at the end of the Supreme Court's term jettisoned a 40-year-old foundational principle of administrative law that judges and courts should defer to the expertise of executive branch administrative agencies in interpreting their governing statutes.

  26. Taylor's Version (of the Law) Rules in Student-Led Course

    The year's most awaited pop album and a Yale Law School reading group had something in common this spring: both were a study of Taylor Swift's experience with fame. ... he even included a Swift-related hypothetical — about litigation stemming from her global tours, including the Justice Department investigation of Ticketmaster's owner ...

  27. Yale Voxtet coached in Scottish and English repertoire by two renowned

    After seven June U.K. performances of Bach's Mass in B Minor with Yale Schola Cantorum, The Yale Voxtet, the ISM's select group of eight singers who specialize in early music, oratorio, and chamber ensemble, traveled to Scotland to take part in a workshop in Scottish and English repertoire. They were coached by Scottish Soprano, Mhairi Lawson in historical Scottish song, and

  28. STEM Tours

    Tours last approximately one hour and will depart rain or shine. Please note: Science and Engineering Tours depart from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 38 Hillhouse Ave. General campus tours ( separate registration required) depart from the Yale Visitor Center at 149 Elm St (academic year), or SSS Hall at 1 Prospect St (summer).

  29. Juneteenth 2024: Celebrating the end of slavery in the U.S

    Explore the history of Juneteenth and the contributions of African Americans, and reflect on the work against racism that still remains, through educational resources curated by the Yale Office of the Secretary and Vice President for University Life. Belonging at Yale's "Focus on Juneteenth" page offers a collection of events, media, and ...

  30. J.D. Vance's journey from a 'Never Trump' guy to Trump's VP pick

    Vance went on to study political science and philosophy at Ohio State University and graduated from Yale Law School. Afterward, he worked at a large corporate law firm and then as a principal at ...