Quick Facts

Jules Verne’s Best Books 📚

Throughout his career, Jules Verne published several incredibly popular novels. These include 'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea' and 'Journey to the Center of the Earth.' 

Emma Baldwin

Written by Emma Baldwin

B.A. in English, B.F.A. in Fine Art, and B.A. in Art Histories from East Carolina University.

Readers can explore a few of Jules Verne’s best novels on this list. These were published in French and then later in English. Most touch on themes of adventure, and discovery, and feature characters who have a love for science and travel. No matter one’s interests, there is sure to be a novel on this list to capture one’s attention.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Digital Art

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea is one of Verne’s best-known novels. It begins with the main character, Professor Aronnax, describing a large terrifying creature (that he thinks is a giant narwhal) attacking ships indiscriminately. It’s soon discovered to be a large submarine, the Nautilus, captained by the unstable Captain Nemo. The novel follows three main characters who are imprisoned by Nemo aboard the submarine and, while learning a great deal about the ocean, eventually escape their confinement. 

From the Earth to the Moon 

This well-known novel was published in 1865. It tells the story of a society of gun enthusiasts, the Baltimore Gun Club, in the United States. They attempt to build and launch a space gun, along with three people, into outer space and complete the first Moon landing. This novel is often cited as one of Verne’s best attempts at including scientifically accurate descriptions. Specifically of what it would take to create the described space cannon. It was followed by Around the Moon. 

Five Weeks in a Balloon

Five Weeks in a Balloon, or, A Journey of Discovery by Three Englishmen in Africa, was published in 1863. The novel follows  Dr. Samuel Fergusson and Richard Kennedy as they travel across the African continent. At the time the book was published, little was known to Europeans about the landscape. To make the journey more exciting, they travel in a hot air balloon. There are numerous adventures included within the novel, including a quest to find the source of the Nile River. 

Around the World in Eighty Days 

This book was first published in French in 1872 and described the journey of Phileas Fogg and his valet, who travel the world in 80 days on a wager of 20,000 pounds. To this day, readers map the journey of the main characters around the world, and the novel remains one of Verne’s most popular literary accomplishments.

Journey to the Center of the Earth 

Journey to the Center of the Earth is another well-known Verne novel. It was published in 1864 and again in 1867. It follows Professor Otto Lidenbrock and his companions on an incredible journey into the depths of the Earth. Verne’s depiction of the center of the Earth has thrilled readers for more than 100 years and has spawned numerous films, and inspired a variety of authors. 

The Mysterious Island 

The Mysterious Island is sometimes described as a sequel to Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. The novel was published in 1875 and includes elements from “ Twenty Thousand” as well as In Search of the Castaways. It is set during the American Civil War and follows five prisoners of war from the North. Within the novel, readers encounter the famed Captain Nemo and learn more about his background. This includes why he was so set on revenge in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea. 

An Antarctic Mystery  

An Antarctic Mystery is a two-part novel written in 1897 and inspired by Edgar Allan Poe’s The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. It features the Kerguelen Islands in the south Indian Ocean and is set in 1839, eleven years after the events in Poe’s novel. The book follows a wealthy American narrator who has spent some time studying wildlife on the remote islands. He boards the Halbrane in order to return to the United States, and the adventure begins. 

The Purchase of the North Pole

The Purchase of the North Pole, also known as Topsy Turvy was published in 1889 and is the third novel to feature the Baltimore Gun Club from From the Earth to the Moon and Around the Moon . It is set twenty years after the first novel and includes some of the same characters readers encountered in the two prequels. The novel describes an auction for the rights to the North Pole, awarded to an anonymous buyer in the United States. Their identity is revealed to be connected to a group aiming to remove the tilt of the Earth’s axis. It’s their belief that if they fire their space cannon, the recoil will shift the world. 

Facing the Flag 

Facing the Flag or For the Flag is, as many of Verne’s best novels are, part of the Voyages extraordinaires series. It was published in 1879 and utilized patriotic themes. It describes how France, and the entire world, become threatened by a super-weapon. After the inventor of the weapon cannot sell it to anyone, he begins to lose his grasp on reality. 

The Child of the Cavern 

The Child of the Cavern, also known as The Black Indies is a novel published in serial form in March and April of 1877. It focuses on a mining community in Scotland and a specific mine everyone there believed to be empty. When it is reopened, the main characters discover that a small community has been living within its depths for decades. 

What is Jules Verne’s best book?

Verne’s best book is commonly cited as either Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea or Journey to the Center of the Earth . These two novels, which are incredibly exciting and touch on themes of adventure, science, and discovery, are certainly his most commonly read.

What are Jules Verne’s books about? 

Jules Verne’s books are generally focused on a few characters who embark on dangerous, thrilling, and unique adventures. For example, traveling to the center of the earth, trying to travel around the world in 80 days, or investigating a small community living in the depths of an abandoned mine.

What is the best Jules Verne book to start with?

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea or Journey to the Center of the Earth are two of the best books to start with if readers are interested in becoming familiar with Verne’s works. Although sections are more complicated and purely science-based, both novels include thrilling adventures. 

Are Jules Verne’s books scientifically accurate? 

While not every fact in Jules Verne’s books is scientifically accurate, much of what Verne included in his novels are based on science. For example, what the Nautilus submarine uses as its means of propulsion in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.

Emma Baldwin

About Emma Baldwin

Emma Baldwin, a graduate of East Carolina University, has a deep-rooted passion for literature. She serves as a key contributor to the Book Analysis team with years of experience.

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Baldwin, Emma " Jules Verne's Best Books 📚 " Book Analysis , https://bookanalysis.com/jules-verne/best-books/ . Accessed 8 February 2024.

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Jules Verne

Jules Verne

(1828-1905)

Who Was Jules Verne?

Jules Verne hit his stride as a writer after meeting publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel, who nurtured many of the works that would comprise the author's Voyages Extraordinaires. Often referred to as the "Father of Science Fiction," Verne wrote books about a variety of innovations and technological advancements years before they were practical realities. Although he died in 1905, his works continued to be published well after his death, and he became the second most translated author in the world.

Early Years and Career

Verne was born on February 8, 1828, in Nantes, France, a busy maritime port city. There, Verne was exposed to vessels departing and arriving, sparking his imagination for travel and adventure. While attending boarding school, he began to write short stories and poetry. Afterward, his father, a lawyer, sent his oldest son to Paris to study law.

Verne continued to write despite pressure from his father to resume his law career, and the tension came to a head in 1852, when Verne refused his father's offer to open a law practice in Nantes. The aspiring writer instead took a meager-paying job as secretary of the Théâtre-Lyrique, giving him the platform to produce Blind Man's Bluff ( Le Colin‑maillard ) and The Companions of the Marjolaine ( Les Compagnons de la Marjolaine ).

In 1856, Verne met and fell in love with Honorine de Viane, a young widow with two daughters. They married in 1857, and, realizing he needed a stronger financial foundation, Verne began working as a stockbroker. However, he refused to abandon his writing career, and that year he also published his first book, The 1857 Salon ( Le Salon de 1857 ) .

Marriage and Child

In 1859, Verne and his wife embarked on the first of approximately 20 trips to the British Isles. The journey made a strong impression on Verne, inspiring him to pen Backwards to Britain ( Voyage en Angleterre et en Écosse ), although the novel wouldn't be published until well after his death. In 1861, the couple's only child, Michel Jean Pierre Verne, was born.

Meeting Pierre-Jules Hetzel

Verne's literary career had failed to gain traction to that point, but his luck would change with his introduction to editor and publisher Hetzel in 1862. Verne was working on a novel that imbued a heavy dose of scientific research into an adventure narrative, and in Hetzel he found a champion for his developing style. In 1863, Hertzel published Five Weeks in a Balloon ( Cinq semaines en ballon) , the first of a series of adventure novels by Verne that would comprise his Voyages Extraordinaires . Verne subsequently signed a contract in which he would submit new works every year to the publisher, most of which would be serialized in Hetzel's Magasin d'Éducation et de Récréation.

Literary Career

In 1864, Hetzel published The Adventures of Captain Hatteras ( Voyages et aventures du capitaine Hatteras) and Journey to the Center of the Earth ( Voyage au centre de la Terre) . That same year, Paris in the Twentieth Century ( Paris au XXe siècle) was rejected for publication, but in 1865 Verne was back in print with From the Earth to the Moon ( De la Terre à la Lune) and In Search of the Castaways ( Les Enfants du capitaine Grant).

Inspired by his love of travel and adventure, Verne soon bought a ship, and he and his wife spent a good deal of time sailing the seas. Verne's own adventures sailing to various ports, from the British Isles to the Mediterranean, provided plentiful fodder for his short stories and novels. In 1867, Hetzel published Verne's Illustrated Geography of France and Her Colonies ( Géographie illustrée de la France et de ses colonies ), and that year Verne also traveled with his brother to the United States. He only stayed a week — managing a trip up the Hudson River to Albany, then on to Niagara Falls — but his visit to America made a lasting impact and was reflected in later works.

In 1869 and 1870, Hetzel published Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea ( Vingt mille lieues sous les mers) , Ar ound the Moon ( Autour de la Lune) and Discovery of the Earth ( Découverte de la Terre). By this point, Verne's works were being translated into English, and he could comfortably live on his writing.

Beginning in late 1872, the serialized version of Verne's famed Around the World in Eighty Days ( Le Tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours ) first appeared in print. The story of Phileas Fogg and Jean Passepartout takes readers on an adventurous global tour at a time when travel was becoming easier and alluring. In the century plus since its original debut, the work has been adapted for the theater, radio, television and film, including the classic 1956 version starring David Niven.

Verne remained prolific throughout the decade, penning The Mysterious Island ( L’Île mystérieuse ), The Survivors of the Chancellor ( Le Chancellor ), Michael Strogoff ( Michel Strogoff ), and Dick Sand: A Captain at Fifteen ( Un Capitaine de quinze ans ), among other works.

Later Years, Death and Posthumous Works

Although he was enjoying immense professional success by the 1870s, Verne began experiencing more strife in his personal life. He sent his rebellious son to a reformatory in 1876, and a few years later Michel caused more trouble through his relations with a minor. In 1886, Verne was shot in the leg by his nephew Gaston, leaving him with a limp for the rest of his life. His longtime publisher and collaborator Hetzel died a week later, and the following year his mother passed away as well.

Verne did, however, continue to travel and write, churning out Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon ( La Jangada ) and Robur the Conqueror ( Robur-le-conquérant ) during this period. His writing soon became noted for a darker tone, with books like The Purchase of the North Pole ( Sans dessus dessous ), Propeller Island ( L’Île à hélice ) and Master of the World (Maître du monde) warning of dangers wrought by technology.

Having established his residence in the northern French city of Amiens, Verne began serving on its city council in 1888. Stricken with diabetes, he died at home on March 24, 1905.

However, his literary output didn't end there, as Michel assumed control of his father's uncompleted manuscripts. Over the following decade, The Lighthouse at the End of the World ( Le Phare du bout du monde), The Golden Volcano ( Le Volcan d’or) and The Chase of the Golden Meteor ( La Chasse au météore) were all published following extensive revisions by Michel.

Additional works surfaced decades later. Backwards to Britain finally was printed in 1989, 130 years after it was written, and Paris in the Twentieth Century , originally considered too far-fetched with its depictions of skyscrapers, gas-fueled cars and mass transit systems, followed in 1994.

In all, Verne authored more than 60 books (most notably the 54 novels comprising the Voyages Extraordinaires ), as well as dozens of plays, short stories and librettos. He conjured hundreds of memorable characters and imagined countless innovations years before their time, including the submarine, space travel, terrestrial flight and deep-sea exploration.

His works of imagination, and the innovations and inventions contained within, have appeared in countless forms, from motion pictures to the stage, to television. Often referred to as the "Father of Science Fiction," Verne is the second most translated writer of all time (behind Agatha Christie ), and his musings on scientific endeavors have sparked the imaginations of writers, scientists and inventors for over a century.

Watch "The Extraordinary Journeys of Jules Verne" on HISTORY Vault

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QUICK FACTS

  • Name: Verne
  • Birth Year: 1828
  • Birth date: February 8, 1828
  • Birth City: Nantes
  • Birth Country: France
  • Gender: Male
  • Best Known For: Jules Verne, a 19th-century French author, is famed for such revolutionary science-fiction novels as 'Around the World in Eighty Days' and 'Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.'
  • Fiction and Poetry
  • Astrological Sign: Aquarius
  • Nacionalities
  • Death Year: 1905
  • Death date: March 24, 1905
  • Death City: Amiens
  • Death Country: France

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CITATION INFORMATION

  • Article Title: Jules Verne Biography
  • Author: Biography.com Editors
  • Website Name: The Biography.com website
  • Url: https://www.biography.com/authors-writers/jules-verne
  • Access Date:
  • Publisher: A&E; Television Networks
  • Last Updated: May 10, 2021
  • Original Published Date: April 2, 2014
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10 Best Jules Verne Books

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Jules Verne was one of the most influential popular writers in modern history. A forerunner of the science fiction genre, Verne took inspiration from the explosion of technological progress during the Industrial Revolution. He crafted adventure stories where daring, intelligent people commanded the forces of the universe. He published 54 novels in his lifetime (collectively known as Voyages Extraordinaires ). His characters built amazing machines, traveled to fantastical places, and indulged their curiosity about the world. It’s safe to say the speculative genres would not be the same without him. If you’re looking for an introduction to his work, here are the 10 best Jules Verne books.

1. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

jules verne time travel book

Published in 1870, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea remains an iconic adventure story. When a mysterious “sea monster” attacks a series of ships, marine biologist Pierre Aronnax joins expert harpooner Ned Land on a mission to track and kill it. The monster turns out to be the submarine Nautilus , commanded by the mysterious Captain Nemo. Taken aboard, Aronnax and Land are comfortable prisoners as Nemo travels through the world’s oceans (the 20,000 leagues refers to distance, not depth), mourning his family and pondering revenge. Through several heart-pounding adventures, Aronnax comes to admire and fear Nemo, leading to a final, daring escape that still packs a punch. Verne anticipated many technologies, most notably submarines, in a story that echoes Homer’s Odyssey as it offers readers a glimpse of an underwater world that remains mysterious to this day.

2. Journey To The Center Of The Earth

jules verne time travel book

Verne’s third published novel, Journey to the Center of the Earth is one of his most popular and influential works. The story of Professor Otto Lidenbrock, who leads a small team into an Icelandic volcano and travels down into a subterranean world, retains its hold on our imagination. It’s been adapted for film and television multiple times, in part because Verne’s adventure story is evergreen, relying on the thrill of the unknown. But it also features well-drawn characters, especially the driven and maddening Lidenbrock, whose desperate need to uncover the world’s mysteries translates into an almost suicidal mission to explore, whatever the risk. While the science part of this fiction is a little wonky by modern standards, there’s still an air of verisimilitude around the story that makes for a thrilling reading experience.

3. Around the World in 80 Days

jules verne time travel book

One of Verne’s most popular and critically-acclaimed books, Around the World in 80 Days benefits from an exciting, evergreen premise. The wealthy and precise gentleman Phileas Fogg reads about a new rail line in India that now makes it possible to travel around the world in record time and makes a bet that he can do so in just 80 days. Encountering a rising number of barriers and setbacks (including being misidentified as a famous wanted criminal and pursued by police), Fogg’s journey takes him through many adventures. He and his band of travelers deal with circuses, Sioux warriors, and hurricanes as they race to win the bet. What sets this novel apart is the sheer joy of the prose, the sense of unbridled discovery and plain old-fashioned fun. Underlying that fun is the faith in technology, the idea that man’s endless innovation and restless invention had conquered traditional barriers—and will continue to do so.

4. The Mysterious Island

jules verne time travel book

A standalone sequel to 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea , The Mysterious Island conceals this until the end of the story. Five Union soldiers escape a Confederate prison in a balloon and crash onto a seemingly deserted island. Using their engineering knowledge and hard work, they build a comfortable life for themselves—augmented by mysterious gifts of supplies that appear out of nowhere. Directed to rescue a stranded man (a character from another Verne novel), they battle pirates and eventually discover the secret of the island. It’s a great, effective plot twist that both explains what’s happening in a satisfactory way and establishes a “Verne Universe” in which all of his stories exist. This novel is a prime example of what makes Verne’s work timeless: A focus on adventure and on risk rewarded with knowledge as opposed to treasure.

5. From the Earth to The Moon

jules verne time travel book

Despite its title, no one actually gets to The Moon in From the Earth to The Moon — that was left for the inferior sequel, Around the Moon . Instead, Verne’s fourth novel focuses on his real passion: Invention and adventure. Impey Barbicane, president of the Baltimore Gun Club, announces he’s calculated that a cannon large enough to fire a capsule all the way to The Moon is possible. Money is raised, and the cannon is constructed. An adventurer named Michel Ardan announces he plans to enter the capsule and travel to The Moon, and after some adventure (including a duel) he’s joined by Barbicane and Barbicane’s nemesis, Captain Nicholl. Although the idea of shooting people to The Moon using a huge cannon might seem quaint, Verne got a surprising amount of the science right, including the choice of Florida as an ideal launch site and many of the details of the capsule itself.

6. The Master of the World

jules verne time travel book

A sequel to Verne’s 1886 novel Robur the Conqueror , The Master of the World eclipses that earlier novel and stands out among Verne’s work for its dark and foreboding tone. A series of inexplicable events is explained by the invention of The Terror , a vehicle capable of moving so fast it becomes nearly invisible to the naked eye. A federal investigator tracks The Terror but is captured by its inventor and taken on a terrifying suicide trip into the eye of a massive storm. Written towards the end of Verne’s life when the writer was suffering a number of physical ailments, the story lacks the wonder and excitement of Verne’s earlier work. It also focuses on the potential danger posed by brilliant people who pursue their own agenda, as opposed to seeing their brilliance as a gateway to adventure. Its surprisingly dark tone elevates the story’s tension, however, making it a remarkably effective late entry in Verne’s bibliography.

7. Five Weeks in a Balloon

jules verne time travel book

Verne’s first published novel, the story was inspired by Verne’s friend Felix Nadar, who attempted to construct an enormous balloon in order to travel around the world. Invited to join Nadar, Verne bowed out but was inspired to imagine what such a trip might be like. In Five Weeks in a Balloon , Verne tells the story of Dr. Samuel Fergusson, his servant Joe, and Richard “Dick” Kennedy, a professional hunter. The trio set out to explore Africa in a balloon filled with hydrogen and designed to give them control over their altitude. Episodic in nature, the story follows the adventurers as they encounter threats both human and natural, escaping each time more by luck than anything else. It’s a bit ragged—Verne would perfect his formula in later novels—but it stands the test of time as an exciting story of daring and the scientific application of knowledge.

8. Michael Strogoff

jules verne time travel book

Often overlooked because it’s the least speculative novel that Jules Verne wrote, Michael Strogoff is a story of intrigue and adventure that echoes the work of Verne’s friend Alexandre Dumas. A rebellion cuts off the eastern Russian empire, and the Tsar’s brother, governor of Irkutsk, is trapped when the city is besieged. The Tsar’s courier, Michael Strogoff, is ordered to somehow enter Irkutsk with vital intelligence for the governor. He’s captured along with hundreds of others, and a tense cat-and-mouse game ensues as the rebels know a spy is in their midst but have no idea what he looks like. It’s a taut spy thriller at its core, with surprisingly accurate depictions of the politics and culture of the region in the 19 th century. The book could be published today and modern readers would still find it an exciting, well-paced adventure.

9. In Search of the Castaways

jules verne time travel book

Many of Jules Verne’s plots spring from a premise that’s really just an excuse for a lengthy adventure, and In Search of the Castaways is in that category. Captain Grant is believed lost at sea when his ship, the Britannia , is wrecked. When a message from Grant is found in a bottle floating on the ocean, Lord and Lady Glenarvan finance a rescue mission. Key information missing from the damaged note means the search party must cover a huge area, leading to many adventures and discoveries as they search for Grant. Another rare Verne story to have almost zero speculative elements, it relies entirely on a well-paced story of discovery and adventure. Although it has aged a bit over the years, Verne’s scientific and geographical knowledge was spot-on at the time, lending the story a sense of realism that heightens the reading experience.

10. The Castle of Carpathians

jules verne time travel book

Considered a bit of an outlier in Verne’s works, The Castle of the Carpathians sees him working in another speculative genre: Horror. In a remote town in Transylvania, a haunted castle towers over everything. The owner, Baron de Gortz, vanished decades before, but strange lights and sounds can still be heard from within. When an old romantic rival of de Gortz, the Count de Telek, visits the castle to debunk the ghost stories, he finds the Baron alive and well. He also finds the castle decorated with the visage of the beautiful singer they both courted, and hears and sees her ghostly presence. It’s an effective Gothic horror story, but Verne offers a non-paranormal explanation for everything that de Telek experiences. The end result is a different sort of adventure, but it’s still a story focused on exploring the unknown—and applying rational thought to everything you encounter.

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Jules Verne Train/Time Train

  • View history

Train (16)

A rear view of the Jules Verne Train.

Train (12)

The interior of the Jules Verne Train.

Tt circuits

The time circuits inside the cabin.

The Jules Verne Train or " Train Time Machine " or simply the " Time Train ", labeled "ELB" on each side after its creator, was the culmination of Dr. Emmett Brown 's previous experience with building the DeLorean time machine and working with the steam locomotive that pushed it to 88 m.p.h. [1]

  • 2 Background information
  • 3 Behind the scenes
  • 4 Appearances
  • 6 Notes and references

History [ ]

The Time Train was a time machine itself that ran off of steam rather than gasoline, built from 1885 to 1895 , which took him ten years to build it. When Doc succeeded in its first temporal displacement test, he and his family traveled to 2015 or beyond to give it a hover conversion .

The flux capacitor was still included in this design, in the place of the lamp at the front of the locomotive [2] Unlike the DeLorean, the external components of the Time Train were symmetrical on both sides of the vehicle, possibly representing a more sophisticated grasp of the time travel technology on Doc's part, despite being constructed from more primitive materials.

On October 27 , 1985 , when Doc met up with Marty McFly and Jennifer Parker , he chose the most likely place that they might be at that given time, the site of the DeLorean's destruction. Interestingly, before the Time Train appeared, it triggered the bells and gates on the nearby railroad crossing as if another train was coming. This could mean that this time machine is so powerful that it enables a connection with its destination time even before arriving to that point of time.

Background information [ ]

Although the events of Back to the Future Part III take place in 1885, the locomotive which pushed the DeLorean to 88 m.p.h. was an 1897 model Rogers 4-6-0 mixed traffic engine. The Time Train is a locomotive of the same design as the one that pushed the DeLorean to 88 mph in 1885. However, the two trains cannot be the same locomotive due to the explosion that destroyed the first train, leaving little of the train on the valley floor. The time train had to have been built from another train either purchased by Doc or by him stealing one; the former being more likely since the upper class clothing of the Brown family indicated he had become rich enough to purchase a locomotive of that type.

The train uses technology from the hoverboard that was left behind when Marty left 1885 for 1985. The frictionless dynamo from the hoverboard was able to store multiples of the 1.21 jigowatts that were necessary for time travel. The original flux capacitor built for the train consisted of a wooden box, metal that was arranged as a "Y", and six incandescent light bulbs arranged in a pattern of three on each side of the box. The original time circuits consisted of three mechanical clocks, where the hour, minute and second hands would display where the time machine currently was, where it had been, and where it was going to go.

On June 12 , 1893 , the Brown family attempted to travel in the Jules Verne train to 1985. Doc had paid a group of railroad workers to lay down fifty yards of track, as he calculated that the distance would be enough to reach 88 mph, since he had improved the performance of the presto logs. The trip failed however, as the train didn't achieve temporal displacement, and crashed.

After seeing a steam tricycle driver driving a Serpollet steam tricycle , Doc decided to use one as a time machine. He used the flux capacitor and the time circuits from the prototype Jules Verne Train. He then donned a diving suit to protect himself from the the stresses of space-time and the temperature variation. He successfully traveled to 2035 , where he had planned to pick up everything he needed to complete the Jules Verne Train.

Soon after that, Doc and Marty became aware of Marcus Irving , a rival inventor who intended to finish his own time machine by modifying the DeLorean's flux capacitor. In the incident, the second DeLorean time machine was damaged. While Doc was supposedly still in the process of repairing the car, the reformed Marcus told Marty that it was actually already complete, and theorized that Doc was delaying his return to 1893 because he was not yet ready to take the Jules Verne Train into the future.

Behind the scenes [ ]

TimeTrainModelFront

A front view of the special effects miniature of the Jules Verne Train.

While designing the look for the train, production designer Rick Carter became inspired by the Nautilus from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea , which seemed an obvious choice considering Doc and Clara's love for the works of Jules Verne . The full-size mock-up of the Time Train still stands at Universal Studios Orlando, even though the ride has since closed.

  • In Back to the Future: The Animated Series , the flux capacitor of the train is located on the inside as shown in the episode " Witchcraft ".
  • A replica of the locomotive (excluding the tender) stood outside the building of Back to the Future: The Ride prior to its closure.
  • In the episode " Put on Your Thinking Caps, Kids! It's Time for Mr. Wisdom! ", the train had a rope that could be fired from the smoke box door. This was used to latch onto the back of the DeLorean, which Walter Wisdom had stolen.
  • The Time Train does not require rails to function as a land vehicle. This can be seen in the episodes " Clara's Folks " and " Put on Your Thinking Caps, Kids! It's Time for Mr. Wisdom! " , in which the train drives on desert ground.
  • The Time Train's tender changed slightly during its on-screen appearances: in Back to the Future Part III , the tender had thrusters like the DeLorean time machine ; but during Back to the Future: The Animated Series it has a compartment for the new DeLorean time machine to fly into. Whether Doc modified the tender to include this compartment or if there are actually two tenders for the Time Train is perhaps best left to personal preference.

Appearances [ ]

Wiki-shrinkable

  • Paradox script
  • Back to the Future Part III
  • Back to the Future Part III novelization
  • Back to the Future: The Animated Series
  • Back to the Future: The Card Game
  • Back to the Future: The Game - Episode 3: Citizen Brown (Mentioned only)
  • Back to the Future: The Game - Episode 4: Double Visions (Mentioned only)
  • LEGO Dimensions
  • Train Valley 2

Sources [ ]

  • Back to the Future: The Official Book of the Complete Movie Trilogy
  • A Matter of Time: The Unauthorized Back to the Future Lexicon

Notes and references [ ]

  • ↑ In Back to the Future: Untold Tales and Alternate Timelines 5 , it is revealed that Doc had improved his Presto logs to attempt to get the train up to 88 m.p.h.
  • ↑ Although in Back to the Future: The Animated Series , it is located inside the cab to the right of the controls.
  • 1 Flux capacitor
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Around the World in Eighty Days

Around the World in Eighty Days

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About the book, about the author.

Jules Verne (1828–1905) was a prolific French author whose writing about various innovations and technological advancements laid much of the foundation of modern science fiction. Verne’s love of travel and adventure, including his time spent sailing the seas, inspired several of his short stories and novels.

Product Details

  • Publisher: Aladdin (April 23, 2024)
  • Length: 320 pages
  • ISBN13: 9781665934213
  • Grades: 5 and up
  • Ages: 10 - 99

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Jules Verne Writer - Where To Start Reading

Jules Verne is an iconic name in the literary world.  He is the architect of numerous adventure-filled, speculative novels that continues to enthrall readers across the globe.  So in this article we are delving into the world of Jules Verne!  From offering an introduction to the famed writer, answering common queries, suggesting an ideal starting point for new readers, and providing a handpicked list of must-read Jules Verne books.  So join us as we embark on a journey into the realms of Verne’s extraordinary literary universe where his vivid imagination and foresight into technological advancements have enabled Verne to create timeless works of literature.

About Jules Verne

But first, who is jules verne.

Jules Verne was a French novelist, poet, and playwright, best remembered for his extraordinary work in the science fiction genre.  Born on February 8, 1828, in Nantes, France, Verne’s fascination with travel and exploration was evident from an early age.  His father intended that he would follow in his footsteps and become a lawyer, but he fell in love with writing and literature instead.  Verne’s passion for writing led to him penning over 54 novels, as well as various short stories, plays, and non-fiction works.  He is also one of the most-translated authors in the world, and his impact on literature, and more specifically on science fiction, is simply immeasurable.

What is Jules Verne known for?

Jules Verne is best known for his groundbreaking works of science fiction, which often featured fantastical journeys, futuristic technology, and a heavy emphasis on exploration and adventure.

About Jules Verne’s Writing & Books

What inspired jules verne to write.

Verne’s love for travel and exploration was the primary inspiration behind his works.  He also drew inspiration from scientific advancements and new discoveries that were happening during his lifetime.

What book should beginners start reading Jules Verne?

For beginners looking to dive into the world of Jules Verne, a good starting point would be his popular novel “Journey to the Center of the Earth” ( Amazon or Bookshop .)  This classic adventure tale follows a group of explorers as they journey down a volcano and discover an underground world filled with prehistoric creatures.  It’s an exciting and imaginative story that showcases Verne’s signature style of combining science and adventure.  Other great options for beginners include “Around the World in Eighty Days” ( Amazon or Bookshop ) and “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” ( Amazon or Bookshop .)

Exploring The Fascinating World of the writer Jules Verne

5 Must-Read Books by Jules Verne

For readers looking to explore books by the writer Jules Verne, here is a list of five must-read books:

  • Journey to the Centre of the Earth
  • Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea
  • Around the World in Eighty Days
  • From the Earth to the Moon
  • The Mysterious Island

Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne

Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne

“Journey to the Centre of the Earth” is a captivating tale of exploration and discovery.  The story revolves around Professor Lidenbrock, his nephew Axel, and their guide Hans, who embark upon a daring expedition to the Earth’s core via a volcanic tube.  Verne’s vivid imagination paints a picture of an incredible subterranean world filled with prehistoric animals and natural phenomena.  Throughout their journey, the trio faces various obstacles, including dangerous creatures, treacherous terrains, and challenging weather conditions, all while dealing with the psychological stress of being thousands of miles beneath the Earth’s surface.  This novel masterfully combines elements of adventure and science, underscoring Verne’s visionary approach to storytelling.

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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

“Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea” is Jules Verne’s thrilling underwater adventure that introduces us to the enigmatic Captain Nemo and his marvelous submarine, the Nautilus.  When a mysterious sea monster is causing havoc in the ocean, marine biologist Professor Aronnax, his faithful servant Conseil, and the hardy harpooner Ned Land embark on an expedition to uncover the truth.  They are captured by Captain Nemo and taken on an extraordinary journey beneath the waves, exploring the wonders and dangers of the ocean’s depths.  Verne’s novel is not only an exciting voyage but also a commentary on the human desire for freedom and the destructive potential of advanced technology.

Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

“Around the World in Eighty Days” is a thrilling race against time as Phileas Fogg, accompanied by his loyal servant Passepartout, sets out to circumnavigate the globe in just eighty days.  This novel captures the spirit of adventure and curiosity that characterizes most of Verne’s work, with a dash of comedy and romance thrown in.  The story takes us through various countries and cultures, showcasing Verne’s incredible attention to detail and knowledge of geography.  It is also a commentary on the advancements in transportation and technology during the 19th century.  This timeless classic has been adapted into numerous films, plays, and TV shows, cementing its status as one of Jules Verne’s most beloved works.

From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne

From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne

“From the Earth to the Moon” is a remarkable tale of man’s journey into space, written more than a century before humans actually walked on the moon.  Verne’s detailed descriptions and scientific accuracy make this story almost prophetic in its ability to predict the future of space travel.  The novel follows the members of a gun club as they plan and execute a mission to send a projectile to the moon using a giant cannon.  Along the way, Verne explores themes of ambition, patriotism, and human ingenuity.  This book is not only an incredible adventure but also an insightful commentary on mankind’s never-ending quest for exploration.

The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne

The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne

“The Mysterious Island” is a thrilling tale of survival and discovery as five men escape the American Civil War on a hot air balloon and end up stranded on an uncharted island in the Pacific Ocean.  As they struggle to adapt to their new environment, they uncover mysteries and secrets that will test their skills, courage, and friendship.  Verne’s attention to detail and scientific accuracy are on full display in this novel, as the characters use their knowledge of technology and science to survive and thrive on the island.  This book is also a commentary on humanity’s relationship with nature and our ability to adapt to new challenges.

Jules Verne Writer - Where To Start Reading

Frequently Asked Questions about Jules Verne

What was jules verne most famous for.

Jules Verne is most famous for his “Extraordinary Voyages” series, which includes iconic novels like “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea,” “Journey to the Center of the Earth,” and “Around the World in Eighty Days.”  These works, known for their rich detail, imaginative scenarios, and visionary grasp of science and technology, have cemented Verne’s reputation as a stalwart of science fiction literature and a master storyteller.

Is Jules Verne considered a pioneer of science fiction?

Yes, Verne is widely considered to be one of the pioneers of science fiction.  His imaginative and visionary works paved the way for the development of the genre as we know it today.

What Disney movie is based on Jules Verne?

The Disney movie “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea” is based on Jules Verne’s novel of the same name.  This 1954 film adaptation remains one of the most popular interpretations of Verne’s work, bringing the thrilling undersea adventure of Captain Nemo to life on the big screen.  Another Disney film, “Around the World in 80 Days” (2004) is also based on a novel by Jules Verne.

How accurate was Jules Verne’s From the Earth to the Moon?

Jules Verne’s “From the Earth to the Moon” is quite remarkable for its scientific accuracy, especially considering it was published in 1865, over a century before mankind actually set foot on the moon.  Verne correctly predicted that the launch of the spacecraft would take place in Florida, USA, not far from where Cape Canaveral is located.  He also foresaw the use of a sort of “cannon” or launch mechanism to propel the spacecraft, which is analogous to the usage of rockets in modern space travel.

However, there were discrepancies too.  Verne’s spacecraft was a bullet-shaped capsule fired by a huge cannon, which would have been lethal for humans due to the extreme acceleration.  Also, Verne imagined the capsule to be occupied by men who walked around inside it, whereas the actual Apollo mission involved astronauts floating in zero gravity.  Verne’s story also envisaged a splashdown landing in the Pacific Ocean, which is what occurred with Apollo missions.  Despite these differences, Verne’s vision of lunar exploration was extraordinarily prescient for its time.

What are the 4 inventions that Jules Verne predicted?

  • Space Travel: In his novel “From the Earth to the Moon,” Jules Verne predicted that mankind would one day travel to space and even accurately described aspects of space travel such as weightlessness, zero gravity, and splashdown landings.
  • Submarines: In “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea,” Verne imagined a futuristic underwater vessel named the Nautilus, which was powered by electricity and could travel underwater for extended periods.  This concept was so ahead of its time that Verne’s description of a submarine closely resembles modern-day submarines.
  • Helicopters: In his novel “Robur the Conqueror,” Jules Verne described a flying machine that resembled a helicopter with spinning rotors, which he named the “Albatross.”  This prediction was made several decades before helicopters were actually invented.
  • Video Conferencing: In his novel “The Carpathian Castle,” Verne described a device called the “telephoto” that allowed people to communicate and see each other in real-time, similar to modern-day video conferencing technology.  This prediction was made over a century before the advent of Skype, FaceTime, Zoom and other video conferencing platforms.  Overall, Jules Verne’s futuristic visions have continued to inspire generations of writers, scientists, and readers, and his works remain timeless classics that will continue to be enjoyed for many years to come.

What Age Should Read Jules Verne?

Jules Verne’s novels are filled with adventure, exploration, and wonder, making them appealing to readers of all ages.  However, considering the complexity of the language, depth of the scientific concepts, and the historical context in which they were written, they might be more suitable for children aged 12 and above.  For younger readers, there are also adapted versions of Verne’s classics that offer a more simplified language and narrative, perfect for introducing them to the world of Jules Verne.  But ultimately, the right age to read Jules Verne can depend on the individual child’s reading level and interest in science and exploration.

Jules Verne was a literary genius who left a lasting legacy in the world of science fiction.  His books inspired generations with their sense of adventure, scientific theories, and incredible imagination.  From diving deep into the oceans to soaring high in the skies, the worlds within Jules Verne’s books will leave you captivated and dreaming of discovery.  So whether you’re a long-time fan or a newcomer to the world of science fiction, Jules Verne’s books are a must-read for any lover of great adventure.

What do you think about these Jules Verne books?

Have you read any books by Jules Verne?  Are any of these books or his other works on your TBR?   What book by Jules Verne is your favorite?  What other Jules Verne books would you add to this list?  Let us talk about it in the comments below.

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Jules Verne Books In Order

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Jules Verne was a French author of novels. He was born in 1828 and died in 1905. Verne is the most famous French author to ever live thanks to the mainstream appeal, popularity, and ultimately the legacy and quality of his works.

He was known for starting the science fiction genre on its way as well as his dynamic novels. Even though he pioneered the genre, the novels and what he writes about did not always fall into the sci-fi category specifically. He wrote about strange worlds and travel through air, space, and underwater before aircraft and submarines or even space travel had been invented. Beyond Agatha Christie and Disney Productions, he is the third most often translated author ever.

Verne wrote romantic adventure stories for the nineteenth centuries that captured the imagination of the public like never before, writing about flying machines or machines that went underwater or fantastical creatures capable of completely destroying a vessel and everyone on board it.

Whether it was the Earth being grazed by a comet like in Hector Servadac or writing about an expedition whose mission is to get to the center of the planet, Jules Verne was always creative, inventive, and included his own flair for storytelling. He was also politically minded and many of his characters played into his sympathies, such as Captain Nemo from 20,000 Leagues being aligned against British Imperialism in India.

Verne admired Edgar Allan Poe’s stories and prose and felt strongly about the importance of scientific accuracy in writing. He was very passionate about accuracy even while writing about fantastical themes (an absence of which in fellow author H.G. Wells earned a chiding by Jules).

Many of his prominent novels were made into shorts and feature-length films and some titles were made into movies more than once and television movies too. Rocket to the Moon, The Mysterious Island, In the Year 2889, has also been turned into a movie, as has “Journey”, “20,000 Leagues”, “Around the World in 80 Days” and countless other classic Verne stories.

Verne became a published novelist when his debut novel Five Weeks In a Balloon was released. The book would later be turned into a movie that was released in 1962. It was filmed in California and starred Barbara Eden as Susan Gale, Red Buttons as Donald O’Shay, and Fabian as Jacques.

It was the first of many novels in his Voyages Extraordinaires series. Verne says that he wanted the story to take readers on a trip to Africa, and the only way to do that was on a balloon, so that is why the hot air balloon is included in the story. He says that at the time of writing it, he had no faith that people would actually be able to travel in giant balloons.

This was followed up by The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras, then it was followed by the third book– the iconic and world-famous A Journey to the Centre of the Earth. There would be much more in this incredible series that boasts a total of 54 novels!

Verne said that his goal with the Voyages series was to depict the Earth as well as outline all the knowledge amassed by modern science as well as recount a history of the universe. He confirmed that his object was to depict the Earth and the universe while achieving a high ideal of beauty and style. He said despite the saying that there cannot be style in an adventure novel, the saying was not true– but noted that the project had been ambitious in nature.

Five Weeks in A Balloon is the first in the series. In it, the main character is Doctor Samuel Fergusson. He is a scholar as well as an explorer who goes on voyages accompanied by two people. These would be Joe, his manservant, and professional hunter Richard Kennedy. Together they set out to discover the African continent and travel the uncharted and not-fully-explored land.

To do this, they will traverse certain areas by sailing in a balloon filled up with hydrogen that allows them to control altitude and take long trips thanks to his invention of a special mechanism. Their goal is to link the East Africa voyages that Sir Richard Burton and others took and connect them to the Sahara and Chad regions.

Starting on the east coast, the trio starts out on a trip that will take them through all of Africa on their way to the east coast. Can they make it? Pick up this book by Jules Verne to find out!

The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras is the second thrilling novel written by Jules Verne as part of the Voyages Extraordinaires series. When the book starts out, First Mate Shandon is surprised to see that he has received a letter in the mail. The mysterious letter has a request for him. It asks him to build a reinforced steamship in Liverpool, England.

This is a very strange request to make of someone and is no small order. Shandon is bewildered and confused, wondering who sent him the letter and for what purpose. Regardless, he makes his way out to Melville Bay and on towards the Arctic labyrinth. That is when at last a crewman reveals himself to Shandon, saying that he is Captain John Hatteras.

Hatteras confides in the First Mate that he has an obsession and must get to the North Pole. It is all that he can think about it and he must attempt it. The Captain follows his intention and it is not long before he experiences extreme cold as well as great hunger. Hatteras treks across the frozen land to find fuel and loses most of his crew along the way, who abandon him in his mad quest.

Hatteras has only an American to go by, and he is a rival explorer at that. As the Captain continues to try and get to the North Pole, he may encounter more danger and adventure than he ever thought possible as he attempts to get to the one place on Earth he wants to go. The odds are against him, but nothing can cause Hatteras to abandon his dream and obsession.

What will happen, and will Captain Hatteras reach the North Pole or perish along the way? Pick up this exciting novel from Jules Verne to find out and if you like this novel be sure to check out the many other books in Verne’s series.

One Response to “Jules Verne”

OMG i had no idea he was such a prolific writer.

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COMMENTS

  1. The Time Machine

    The Time Machine is a post-apocalyptic science fiction novella by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. The work is generally credited with the popularization of the concept of time travel by using a vehicle or device to travel purposely and selectively forward or backward through time.

  2. Around the World in Eighty Days

    Around the World in Eighty Days (French: Le Tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is an adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, first published in French in 1872.

  3. From the Earth to the Moon

    From the Earth to the Moon: A Direct Route in 97 Hours, 20 Minutes ( French: De la Terre à la Lune, trajet direct en 97 heures 20 minutes) is an 1865 novel by Jules Verne.

  4. The Time Machine: Full Book Summary

    A group of men, including the narrator, is listening to the Time Traveller discuss his theory that time is the fourth dimension. The Time Traveller produces a miniature time machine and makes it disappear into thin air. The next week, the guests return, to find their host stumble in, looking disheveled and tired.

  5. Around the World in Eighty Days

    Around the World in Eighty Days, travel adventure novel by French author Jules Verne, published serially in 1872 in Le Temps and in book form in 1873. The work tells the story of the unflappable Phileas Fogg 's trip around the world, accompanied by his emotional valet, Passepartout, to win a bet.

  6. The Time Machine

    The Time Machine, first novel by H. G. Wells, published in book form in 1895. The novel is considered one of the earliest works of science fiction and the progenitor of the " time travel" subgenre. SUMMARY: Wells advanced his social and political ideas in this narrative of a nameless Time Traveller who is hurtled into the year 802,701 by ...

  7. Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

    Novels of French writer Jules Gabriel Verne, considered the founder of modern science fiction, include Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864) and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873). This author who pioneered the genre. People best know him for Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870). Verne wrote about space, air, and underwater travel before people invented navigable aircraft and ...

  8. 10 of the Best Jules Verne Books

    At the time the book was published, little was known to Europeans about the landscape. To make the journey more exciting, they travel in a hot air balloon. There are numerous adventures included within the novel, including a quest to find the source of the Nile River. ... Jules Verne's books are generally focused on a few characters who ...

  9. From the Earth to the Moon

    Although the novel was subtitled Trajet direct en 97 heures 20 minutes ("Direct Passage in Ninety-seven Hours and Twenty Minutes"), the actual journey to the Moon was depicted in the book's sequel, Autour de la Lune (1870; Round the Moon ).

  10. From the Earth to the Moon by Jules Verne

    3.76 32,274 ratings1,576 reviews Verne's 1865 tale of a trip to the moon is (as you'd expect from Verne) great fun, even if bits of it now seem, in retrospect, a little strange. Our rocket ship gets shot out of a cannon? To the moon? Goodness!

  11. Journey to the Center of the Earth

    Journey to the Center of the Earth (French: Voyage au centre de la Terre), also translated with the variant titles A Journey to the Centre of the Earth and A Journey into the Interior of the Earth, is a classic science fiction novel by Jules Verne.It was first published in French in 1864, then reissued in 1867 in a revised and expanded edition. Professor Otto Lidenbrock is the tale's central ...

  12. Jules Verne

    Early Years and Career Verne was born on February 8, 1828, in Nantes, France, a busy maritime port city. There, Verne was exposed to vessels departing and arriving, sparking his imagination for...

  13. 10 Best Jules Verne Books

    1. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Published in 1870, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea remains an iconic adventure story. When a mysterious "sea monster" attacks a series of ships, marine biologist Pierre Aronnax joins expert harpooner Ned Land on a mission to track and kill it.

  14. Complete Works of Jules Verne (illustrated): A Jorney To ...

    Jules Verne, a 19th-century French author, is famed for such revolutionary science-fiction novels as "Around the World in Eighty Days" and "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea".He has sometimes been called the "Father of Science Fiction", a title that has also been given to H. G. Wells and Hugo Gernsback.In all, Verne authored more than 60 books (most notably the 54 novels comprising ...

  15. Jules Verne Train/Time Train

    The Jules Verne Train or " Train Time Machine " or simply the " Time Train ", labeled "ELB" on each side after its creator, was the culmination of Dr. Emmett Brown 's previous experience with building the DeLorean time machine and working with the steam locomotive that pushed it to 88 m.p.h. [1] Contents 1 History 2 Background information

  16. A Journey to the Centre of the Earth

    A Journey to the Centre of the Earth, novel by prolific French author Jules Verne, published in 1864. It is the second book in his popular series Voyages extraordinaires (1863-1910), which contains novels that combine scientific facts with adventure fiction and laid the groundwork for science fiction. Summary

  17. Best Works of Jules Verne (50 books)

    Best Works of Jules Verne. Jules Verne was a very influential writer of early science fiction. Let's pick our favorite stories that he wrote. flag. All Votes Add Books To This List. 1. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Captain Nemo, #2) by. Jules Verne.

  18. Jules Verne

    His collaboration with the publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel led to the creation of the Voyages extraordinaires, [3] a series of bestselling adventure novels including Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas (1870), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1872).

  19. Around the World in Eighty Days

    Jules Verne (1828-1905) was a prolific French author whose writing about various innovations and technological advancements laid much of the foundation of modern science fiction. Verne's love of travel and adventure, including his time spent sailing the seas, inspired several of his short stories and novels.

  20. The Adventurous World of Jules Verne & Where To Start Reading

    Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne. "Journey to the Centre of the Earth" is a captivating tale of exploration and discovery. The story revolves around Professor Lidenbrock, his nephew Axel, and their guide Hans, who embark upon a daring expedition to the Earth's core via a volcanic tube. Verne's vivid imagination paints a ...

  21. Jules Verne

    Jules Verne See all media Category: Arts & Culture Born: February 8, 1828, Nantes, France Died: March 24, 1905, Amiens (aged 77) Notable Works: "A Journey to the Centre of the Earth" "Around the World in Eighty Days" "Five Weeks in a Balloon" "From the Earth to the Moon" "The Mysterious Island" "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" (Show more)

  22. Jules Verne

    Verne wrote romantic adventure stories for the nineteenth centuries that captured the imagination of the public like never before, writing about flying machines or machines that went underwater or fantastical creatures capable of completely destroying a vessel and everyone on board it.

  23. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas

    Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas (French: Vingt Mille Lieues sous les mers) is a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne.. The novel was originally serialized from March 1869 through June 1870 in Pierre-Jules Hetzel's fortnightly periodical, the Magasin d'éducation et de récréation.A deluxe octavo edition, published by Hetzel in November 1871, included 111 ...

  24. Lost dogs, lost titles and something harder than diamond

    Fifteen questions on general knowledge and topical trivia, plus a few jokes, every Thursday. How will you fare?