Avalon Waterways River Cruises

Experience a world beyond your expectations. Choose from our award-winning vacations on virtually every continent with local favorites and off-the-beaten-path experiences only Globus can share.

We know why you travel. You’d rather have an extra day exploring than a fancy chocolate on your pillow at night. Enjoy hand-selected inclusions and world-class experiences for value-minded travel lovers like you.

Raise your sights and set your sails for the rivers of Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa on an Avalon Waterways cruise. Elevate your cruise experience with fewer passengers, more choices, and endless possibilities.

France River Cruises

River Cruises through France

Embark on exquisite and timeless journeys like no other on an Avalon river cruise in France. From captivating cities to countrysides that capture the essence of French culture and traditions, you'll find joie de vivre around each bend. From the pastoral treasures of Burgundy and Provence to the sophisticated savoir faire of Paris ; from the legendary landing beaches at Normandy to the lovely lanes of Strasbourg ; to the gastronomical capital of  Lyon , Avalon invites you to discover la vie en rose on the rivers of France!  

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Choosing The Best French River Cruise For You

La vie est belle — life is beautiful on our best river cruises through France. Dine in enchanting châteaux, visit sun-drenched vineyards, stroll through timeless medieval villages and view painterly landscapes as you follow the Seine to Normandy or the Rhône through the South of France.

Best French River Cruises

Best For First Timers - Impressions From the Seine: Paris to Normandy

Musée du Louvre

Explore the heart of France on our best French river cruise for families. This unforgettable journey along the Seine begins in Paris, where you can sightsee by foot or bicycle, climb the Eiffel Tower and search for clues on an art-inspired scavenger hunt inside Musée du Louvre. As you wind through France's scenic landscape, you'll step into Impressionistic masterpieces on an early-access visit to Monet's Gardens at Giverny. You'll tour the D-Day beaches of Normandy to pay tribute to fallen heroes at Omaha Beach and the American Cemetery. Touching WWII artifacts at the unique D-Day Academy helps put the Allied invasion into context. On your return to Paris, travel back to medieval times in Rouen before the grand finale—a visit to the Château de Versailles. Choices here include a tour of the magical palace and gardens or a guided bike ride that also stops at Marie Antoinette's farm. 

All aboard for hands-on fun. View details for Tauck' France Family Vacation on a riverboat.

Best For Experienced Travelers - French Escapade: Paris to the Riviera

Le Cordon Bleu Paris

Sample everything the fertile Rhône Valley has to offer on this taste-making and best-rated French river cruise, named the 2018 Winner for Best Culinary Adventure from AFAR Travelers' Choice Awards. Your aperitif is a 2-night stay in Paris at the InterContinental Le Grand, where you'll take a Le Cordon Bleu pastry class before hopping a train to Lyon, considered the "culinary capital of France."   As you travel along the Rhône to Provence, you'll partake in epicurean experiences that range from tasting earthy treasures at a truffle farm to sipping Beaujolais in the actual Beaujolais wine region. Other highlights for food and wine lovers are a wine tasting in Châteaneuf-du-Pape and a private culinary lesson at Scook, Anne-Sophie Pic's cooking school in Valence. And at a Tauck Exclusive gala evening, you'll be a dinner guest of the Duke of Uzès at his 12th-century family castle in Avignon. Bon voyage and bon appétit! View our 10-day Southern France River Cruise .

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France Cruises

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  • Seine River - Embark in Paris en route to the cliffs and beaches of Normandy. Along this historic cruise, you will pass through the quaint towns of Giverny, Les Andelys, Honfleur, Duclair and Jumièges, where you'll see the birthplace of impressionism along with royal châteaux. 
  • Rhine River  - Cruise into the scenic heart of Europe from the French city of Strasbourg on the border with Germany . From here, your cruise will take you through a land of sweeping green valleys, castles, and traditional cuisine, passing through Germany, Switzerland, and Amsterdam.
  • Rhone & Saone Rivers  - There's no better river for wine lovers to cruise than the Rhone, originating high in the Swiss Alps and eventually joining the Saone at Lyon to flow into the Mediterranean . On these relaxed-pace river cruises, the smells of lavender and savory flavors of wine highlight the itinerary.
  • Bordeaux  - Get a taste of the old-fashioned way of life and sample some of France's best vintages cruising the Gironde, Dordogne, and Garonne Rivers from Bordeaux visiting  Pauillac ,  Macon , Cadillac, Saint-Émilion and Libourne and Bourg. These are great cruises for active travelers hoping to hike and bike along the way!
  • Moselle River  - The romantic Moselle river winds through forested landscapes that reveal castles, quaint villages and terraced hillsides as it makes its way from the Vosges mountains, through French wine country, along the border of Luxembourg and thorough Germany where it flows into the Rhine River at Koblenz .
  • French Mediterranean - Take a luxurious Mediterranean cruise along the sun-kissed and celebrity filled beaches of the coast and explore  Nice ,  Cannes , or  St Tropez  where you can embark on an unforgettable cruise of the French Riviera, just like the rich and famous have done for centuries, since British monarchs came to these shores to escape the cold northern winters!
  • Corsica  - Join us on a cruise to Corsica, a breathtaking island in the center of the  Mediterranean  between  France  and  Italy  that has a unique culture combing both French and Italian characteristics.

France Travel Overview

Best time to visit france, top france cruise ports river and sea, french travel stories, mediterranean babymoon, transylvania for the weekend- travel insurance advised, france cruise faqs, top france travel destinations.

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France Gorgeous and Gourmet.

France is the quintessential destination for good reason. Whether you visit romantic Northern France, stunning Bordeaux, or charming Burgundy & Provence, you'll find yourself enchanted by the best wines and cuisines the world has to offer. Come for the famous Chateau wineries of Bordeaux and cultural landmarks of Paris, then leave reminiscing about your stroll through Monet's Giverny gardens and your kayak ride under the Pont-du-Guard.

Learn more about why a river cruise with Uniworld is the best way cruise.

Burgundy & Provence

Burgundy & Provence

Arles to Lyon | 8 days

Cruise the Rhône and Saône rivers, enjoying the region’s incomparable wine and cuisine and discovering its many treasures. Stroll the very streets of Arles made famous by Van Gogh....

Ship: S.S. Catherine

Country: France

Rivers: Rhône, Saône

4.6 /5 (932 reviews)

From $3,599 per person

Learn more Get a Quote

Grand France

Grand France

Arles to Paris | 15 days

For Francophiles in love with the culture, history, cuisine and romance of France, this grand voyage is a dream come true. Soak up the joie de vivre that makes France one of the most adored countries ...

Ships: S.S. Catherine, S.S. Joie de Vivre

Rivers: Rhône, Saône, Seine

4.7 /5 (129 reviews)

From $6,799 per person

Brilliant Bordeaux

Brilliant Bordeaux

Bordeaux to Bordeaux | 8 days

Set sail along three stunning rivers, the Garonne, Dordogne and Gironde, on one fascinatingly historical and invigorating journey. Explore the country’s breathtaking backdrops, wines and...

Ship: S.S. Bon Voyage

Rivers: Dordogne, Garonne

4.4 /5 (419 reviews)

From $3,299 per person

Paris & Normandy

Paris & Normandy

Paris to Paris | 8 days

Cruise from Paris through Normandy’s countryside, uncovering its many charms: Château de La Roche-Guyon, the medieval capital of Rouen, Monet’s beloved home in Giverny and the famed ...

Ship: S.S. Joie de Vivre

River: Seine

4.7 /5 (809 reviews)

From $3,899 per person

Ultimate France

Ultimate France

Bordeaux to Arles | 22 days

This triumvirate of France brings you the very best of each region—Paris and the Normandy coast in the north, vineyard-rich Bordeaux in the southwest and the sun-drenched Mediterranean delights ...

Ships: S.S. Bon Voyage, S.S. Catherine, S.S. Joie de Vivre

Rivers: Dordogne, Garonne, Rhône, Seine

4.4 /5 (51 reviews)

From $11,999 per person

A Portrait of Majestic France

A Portrait of Majestic France

Bordeaux to Paris | 15 days

This picture-perfect journey blends your passion for the good life—art, culture and gastronomy—with a broad sweep of lovely French landscapes. Travel from beautiful Bordeaux and delight...

Ships: S.S. Bon Voyage, S.S. Joie de Vivre

Rivers: Dordogne, Garonne, Seine

4.5 /5 (93 reviews)

From $7,499 per person

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France represents an excellent choice for would-be river cruisers as it boasts a number of different waterways on which you can travel during a voyage, each of which offers its own distinct blend of history, culture and stunning scenery. The most well-known is certainly the Seine in the north of France, not least because it offers river cruisers the opportunity to explore France’s legendary capital Paris. The Rhone is a great way to experience the south of France and the celebrated beauty – and indeed wine – that it is famous for and also provides the chance to briefly sample another French river – one of its tributaries the Saone. The Moselle offers another opportunity to experience the country’s capital before you set sail. From awe-inspiring UNESCO World Heritage Sites to lush wine-growing valleys, you can experience the best that France has to offer with a river cruise.

View Bordeaux River Cruises   View Lyon River Cruises   View Paris River Cruises   View Strasbourg River Cruises   View France River Cruises

Rivers Flowing Through France

Though the river begins its journey in the east of the country close to Dijon, river cruises along the Seine tend to be round-trips from the country’s capital, presenting river cruisers with plenty of opportunities to explore Paris’ many sights . Legendary landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower, the Champs Elysees, the Louvre and Notre Dame Cathedral are all yours to experience, either before you embark or upon your return. During your Seine cruise, you’ll likely dock at Vernon, whereby you’ll be able to take a trip to Giverny and the former home of one of the country’s most revered artistic sons, Claude Monet. Rouen in the Normandy region is another popular port of call. It’s the city where Joan of Arc was martyred, offering some captivating architecture and a wealth of medieval history to explore. On Seine cruises, you may also visit Les Andelys, famous for its Chateau Gaillard and Conflans, which offers a charming river trade heritage and also the opportunity for a trip to the opulent Palace of Versailles, where none other than Louis XIV once resided.

The Rhone and Saone  

The Rhone is your ticket to the beauty of southern France and a journey along it can take you from the centre of the country to its beautiful, clement coast. Chalon-sur-Saone is a small town which offers plenty of charm and acts as a starting point for many a Rhone and Saone cruise, providing you with a taste of the Saone before you join the larger Rhone to continue your journey. Lyon lies just south of the point at which the Rhone and Saone Rivers meet and is a key port of call for many cruises along the rivers. This 2,000-year-old UNESCO World Heritage Site offers a wealth of architectural treasures, such as the Basilica of Notre Dame and the St Jean Cathedral. Vienne meanwhile delivers a very different taste of southern France with a strong Roman heritage – don’t miss the temple of Augustus & Livia and the amphitheatre. Tournon is your opportunity to sample some of the region’s celebrated red wine, while Viviers offers a pleasing mix of medieval and Renaissance architecture. Arles boasts more Roman architectural treasures to discover, while Avignon is one of the nation’s most historically important cities, as the historic home of seven different popes in the 1300s.

The Moselle

The Moselle is, in fact, a tributary of the Rhine and though, like its mother river, it flows through Germany, it actually begins its journey in France’s Voges Mountains. This means that a number of Moselle itineraries begin in Paris, which doesn’t lie on the river but is close enough to warrant transfers to where your Moselle cruise begins in Trier, Germany. This offers the chance to experience more countries during your Moselle voyage and also lets you see Paris’ numerous iconic landmarks .

Garonne, Gironde and Dordogne

A select number of French river cruise itineraries also explore this beautiful tidal river system, which gives river cruisers the opportunity to explore the famous Bordeaux wine-growing region. Bordeaux itself is located on the Garonne and boasts a wealth of stunning 18th-century architecture, while other key stops include Blaye, famous for its 17th-century citadel and Cadillac, from where many river cruise operators offer wine-tasting excursions. France river cruise travel tips

The Currency in France is the Euro

  • Even if you only know a little French, locals will appreciate your attempts to speak it
  • In larger tourist-centric cities, you’ll find English in wider use
  • In Northern France, you can expect similar temperatures to the UK but Southern France enjoys a warmer climate

France Ports

Arromanches-les-bains, le verdon-sur-mer.

Situated on the Garonne River, 70 miles (113 km) inland from the Atlantic, Bordeaux's origin can be traced back to the 3rd century when it was Aquitaine's Roman capital called Burdigala. From 1154 to 1453, the town prospered under the rule of the English, whose fondness for the region's red wines gave impetus to the local wine industry. At various times, Bordeaux even served as the nation's capital: in 1870, at the beginning of World War I, and for two weeks in 1940 before the Vichy government was proclaimed. Bordeaux's neo-classical architecture, wide avenues and well-tended public squares and parks lend the city a certain grandeur. Excellent museums, an imposing cathedral and a much-praised theatre add to the city's attractions. The principal highlights, clustered around the town centre, can easily be explored on foot.

Cussac-Fort-Médoc

Villefranche-sur-saône.

Situated in the Normandy region of France alongside the river Seine, Vernon is a must-visit town best known for the iconic Monet's Garden at Giverny, located just a short distance away. Within the town, art enthusiasts and nature lovers are enchanted by timber-framed houses, a medieval bridge and the awe-inspiring Collegiate Church of Our Lady.

United with France only since 1860, Nice has its own history and atmosphere, which dates back 230,000 years. It was on Colline du Château (now château-less) and at the Plage des Ponchettes, in front of the Old Town, that the Greeks established a market-port in 350 BC and named it Nikaia, which would become Marseilles' chief coastal rival. The Romans established themselves a little later on the hills of Cimiez (Cemenelum), already previously occupied by Ligurians and Celts, and quickly overshadowed the waterfront port. After falling to the Saracen invasions, Nice regained power as an independent state, becoming an important port in the early Middle Ages.So cocksure did it become that in 1388, Nice, along with the hill towns behind, effectively seceded from the county of Provence, under Louis d'Anjou, and allied itself with Savoie. Thus began its liaison with the House of Savoy, and through it with Piedmont and Sardinia, it was the Comté de Nice (Nice County). This relationship lasted some 500 years, tinting the culture, architecture, and dialect in rich Italian hues.By the 19th century Nice was flourishing commercially, locked in rivalry with the neighboring shipping port of Genoa. Another source of income: the dawning of tourism, as first the English, then the Russian nobility, discovered its extraordinary climate and superb waterfront position. A parade of fine stone mansions and hotels closed into a nearly solid wall of masonry, separated from the smooth-round rocks of the beach by what was originally named Camin deis Anglés (the English Way), which of course is now the famous Promenade des Anglais. This magnificent crescent, which is seeking UNESCO recognition, is one of the noblest in France. Many of Nice's most delightful attractions—the Cours Saleya market, the Old Town streets, the Hotel Negresco, and the Palais Masséna—are on or close to this 10-km (6-mile) waterfront, making it the first stop for most visitors, while the redevelopment of Nice's port, around the other side of the Colline du Château, makes it easier for amblers who want to take in the Genoese architecture or peruse the antiques at the Puces de Nice, now part of the Promenade des 100 Antiquaires, along Quai Papacino. Nice also has the distinction of the "Family Plus" label, with free strollers, play areas, and restaurants with child-friendly activities.

Glénan Islands

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean and the country’s seventh largest city, Nantes is located on the north bank of the Loire River. Although officially no longer the capital of Brittany since Nantes was included in the Pays de Loire administrative region, many of the city’s inhabitants regard themselves still an integral part of Brittany. During medieval times, much of the city’s prosperity resulted from colonial expeditions and the slave trade. Today Nantes is the most important commercial and industrial centre in west-central France, and appears as a particularly well-managed city with fine museums and carefully tended parks and gardens. One of the museums is dedicated to Jules Verne, born here in 1828. The Loire, foundation of Nantes’ riches, has dwindled from the city centre. As recently as the 1930s the river crossed the city in seven separate channels. However, they were filled in after World War II but, fortunately, left the area’s 18th-century mansions intact. They once were the trademark of rich merchants who made their fortunes from the slave trade. French influence was brought to Nantes by the Loire and its trade from the end of the 18th century when the city became known as "Little Paris." The Place Royale and the Place Graslin were first laid out during that time. One of the most impressive landmarks is the Chateau des Ducs, most of which is preserved in its original form built by the last two rulers of independent Brittany, Francois II, and his daughter Duchess Anne, born here in 1477.

Adorned with stunning Gothic architecture, Rouen is a city steeped in history situated in the Normandy region of France. Notable city landmarks include the breath-taking Rouen Cathedral, immortalised by Claude Monet's artwork, and the medieval astronomical clock, the Gros-Holorge. The charming old town paved with cobblestone and lined with half-timbered houses only serves to enhance the medieval charm, providing a fitting backdrop to the city's rich cultural heritage and associations with iconic figures such as Joan of Arc, seamlessly blending historical implication with French provincial charm.

Mantes-la-Jolie

Ushant island.

Tournus, characterised by Romanesque architecture and the iconic Abbey of Saint-Philibert, is a historical town situated in the Saône-et-Loire department. Its cultural significance exudes through its well-preserved structures, and visitors find themselves immersed in vibrant local markets showcasing regional produce, or enjoying serene walks along the stunning Saône River.

La Voulte-sur-Rhône

Marseilles-lès-aubigny, boulogne-sur-mer, palavas-les-flots, bouchemaine, aigues-mortes, talmont-sur-gironde, châteauneuf-du-rhône, la rochelle, île-d'yeu, saint-cyr-sur-mer, l'île-rousse.

“Where the mountains meet the sea,” the beautiful island of Corsica, set in the blue waters of the Mediterranean between Italy and France, is steeped in history. Ile Rousse is built on the site of an old roman settlement. She rivals Calvi as a seaside resort, with nice sandy beaches and good accommodation facilities. The port of Ile Rousse was built by Pasquale Paoli –most famous Corsican Patriot-in 1758 to replace Calvi, still in Genoese hands, has taken the place of first port in this region for exporting fresh fruit and olive oil. The harbour is located on an peninsula, red coloured rock, that just comes out of the sea hence the name of Ile Rousse which means “ reddish island”. There is a lighthouse at the outer end of the island with an old ruined tower. Returning to the mainland a street leads from port to town centre along a nice sandy beach, towards the main square Place Paoli. In the middle of the square there is a statue of Pascal Paoli. During Summer season, the square surrounded by palm trees welcomes numerous tourists looking for some shade and refreshing ice cream. The old market situated in the middle of the town, faced to the Paoli square, offers a large choice of fresh fruits and veggies as well as fish from the catch of the day, or a sample of the famous Corsican delicatessen, cheeses, honeys and wines.

Sitting on the banks of the Saône River is Mâcon, a stunning town in the Burgundy region best known for its wine production. Characterised by its enchanting streets, lively markets and iconic historic landmarks, including the Saint-Pierre Church. Not only is Mâcon a charming town, it is also a significant hub for the wine industry situated amidst the world-famous vineyards of Burgundy, inviting visitors to explore the local vineyards and wineries and to indulge in tastings of the region's exquisite white wines.

Chalon-sur-Saône

Saint-tropez.

At first glance, it really doesn't look all that impressive. There's a pretty port with cafés charging €5 for a coffee and a picturesque old town in sugared-almond hues, but there are many prettier in the hills nearby. There are sandy beaches, rare enough on the Riviera, and old-fashioned squares with plane trees and pétanque players, but these are a dime a dozen throughout Provence. So what made St-Tropez an internationally known locale? Two words: Brigitte Bardot. When this pulpeuse (voluptuous) teenager showed up in St-Tropez on the arm of Roger Vadim in 1956 to film And God Created Woman, the heads of the world snapped around. Neither the gentle descriptions of writer Guy de Maupassant (1850–93), nor the watercolor tones of Impressionist Paul Signac (1863–1935), nor the stream of painters who followed (including Matisse and Bonnard) could focus the world's attention on this seaside hamlet as did this one sensual woman in a scarf, Ray-Bans, and capris. Vanity Fair ran a big article, "Saint Tropez Babylon," detailing the over-the-top petrodollar parties, megayachts, and Beyoncé–d paparazzi. But don't be turned off: the next year, Stewart, Tabori & Chang released an elegant coffee-table book, Houses of St-Tropez, packed with photos of supremely tasteful and pretty residences, many occupied by fashion designers, artists, and writers. Once a hangout for Colette, Anaïs Nin, and Françoise Sagan, the town still earns its old moniker, the "Montparnasse of the Mediterranean." Yet you might be surprised to find that this byword for billionaires is so small and insulated. The lack of train service, casinos, and chain hotels keeps it that way. Yet fame, in a sense, came too fast for St-Trop. Unlike the chic resorts farther east, it didn't have the decades-old reputation of the sort that would attract visitors all year around. For a good reason: its location on the south side of the gulf puts it at the mercy of the terrible mistral winter winds. So, in summer the crowds descend and the prices rise into the stratosphere. In July and August, you must be carefree about the sordid matter of cash. After all, at the most Dionysian nightclub in town, a glass of tap water goes for $37 and when the mojo really gets going, billionaires think nothing of "champagne-spraying" the partying crowds—think World Series celebrations but with $1,000 bottles of Roederer Cristal instead of Gatorade. Complaining about summer crowds, overpricing, and lack of customer service has become a tourist sport and yet this is what makes St-Tropez—described by the French daily newspaper Le Figaro as the place you can see "the greatest number of faces per square meter"—as intriguing as it is seductive.

Châteauneuf-du-Pape

Sanary-sur-mer.

The fishing village of Sète serves as gateway to Montpellier, in the North. Other noteworthy destinations in this area include Carcassone, Aigues Mortes, the Abbaye de Fontfroide, and Pezenas. For a look at the real fisherman's life, however, stay right where you are. Sète is the Mediterranean's biggest fishing port. Canals winding through town make it fun to stroll around, and there are a number of good walking paths leading to the beach (about 30 minutes to the west). Although it's small and unspectacular, Plage de la Corniche has calm, pristine waters that are perfect for swimming. For a panoramic view of the area, climb Mont St-Clair or Les Pierres Blanches and pick a beach to settle down on.

Tain-l'Hermitage

Port-saint-louis-du-rhône.

Visit Locronan, France’s most picturesque medieval village. Once there, you will have a guided visit and will see the church with its 15th century stained glass depicting the passion of Saint Ronan. At Le Guillou bakery you can taste the traditional Breton butter cake known as “kouign amann” before watching a group of Breton dancers in their traditional costumes, introducing you to Brittany’s rich culture and identity.

Port-Vendres

Propriano, corsica, porto-vecchio.

Set on a hillock overlooking a beautiful deep blue bay, Porto Vecchio, 15 miles (25km) north of Bonifacio, was rated by Scottish author James Boswell as one of "the most distinguished harbours in Europe". It was founded in 1539 as a second Genoese stronghold on the east coast, Bastia being well established in the north. The site was perfect; close to the unexploited and fertile plain, it benefited from secure high land and a sheltered harbour, although the mosquito population spread malaria and wiped out the first Ligurian settlers within months. Things began to take off mainly thanks to the cork industry, which still thrived well into the twentieth century. Today, a third of Corsica's wine is exported from Porto Vecchio, but most revenue comes from visitors. Around the centre of town explore the well-preserved fortress and the small grid of ancient streets backing onto the main place de la République. East of the square you can't miss the Porte Génoise, which frames a delightful expanse of sea and salt pans and through which you'll find the quickest route down to the modern marina, lined with cafés and hotels.

Saint-Raphaël

Since being designated a European Capital of Culture for 2013, with an estimated €660 million of funding in the bargain, Marseille has been in the throes of an extraordinary transformation, with no fewer than five major new arts centers, a beautifully refurbished port, revitalized neighborhoods, and a slew of new shops and restaurants. Once the underdog, this time-burnished city is now welcoming an influx of weekend tourists who have colonized entire neighborhoods and transformed them into elegant pieds-à-terre (or should we say, mer). The second-largest city in France, Marseille is one of Europe's most vibrant destinations. Feisty and fond of broad gestures, it is also as complicated and as cosmopolitan now as it was when a band of Phoenician Greeks first sailed into the harbor that is today's Vieux Port in 600 BC. Legend has it that on that same day a local chieftain's daughter, Gyptis, needed to choose a husband, and her wandering eyes settled on the Greeks' handsome commander Protis. Her dowry brought land near the mouth of the Rhône, where the Greeks founded Massalia, the most important Continental shipping port in antiquity. The port flourished for some 500 years as a typical Greek city, enjoying the full flush of classical culture, its gods, its democratic political system, its sports and theater, and its naval prowess. Caesar changed all that, besieging the city in 49 BC and seizing most of its colonies. In 1214 Marseille was seized again, this time by Charles d'Anjou, and was later annexed to France by Henri IV in 1481, but it was not until Louis XIV took the throne that the biggest transformations of the port began; he pulled down the city walls in 1666 and expanded the port to the Rive Neuve (New Riverbank). The city was devastated by plague in 1720, losing more than half its population. By the time of the Revolution, Marseille was on the rebound once again, with industries of soap manufacturing and oil processing flourishing, encouraging a wave of immigration from Provence and Italy. With the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, Marseille became the greatest boomtown in 19th-century Europe. With a large influx of immigrants from areas as exotic as Tangiers, the city quickly acquired the multicultural population it maintains to this day.

La Roche-Guyon

Château-thierry, le lavandou, baume-les-dames, tournon-sur-rhône, porticcio, corsica, dives-sur-mer.

France's iconic and enchanting capital, Paris, is a globally recognised symbol of art, culture and romance, sitting along the banks of the river Seine. Home to world-famous landmarks including the Eiffel Tower, Louvre Museum and the Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris is a beacon of timeless elegance, cultural richness and historical magnitude. Affectionately named the City of Light and the City of Love, Paris enchants with its stunning boulevards, charming cafes and world-class culinary scene, with the Seine gracefully winding through the city and further enhancing the romantic allure. The artistic haven of Monmartre contributes to the city's heritage and status as a global symbol of fashion, art and culinary excellence, serving as an epitome of sophistication in a destination that seamlessly intertwines history and modernity.

Saint-Jean-de-Losne

Anse de morgat, saint-florent, lutzelbourg, montbéliard, waltenheim-sur-zorn, cavalaire-sur-mer, montoir-de-bretagne, baie de roccapina, corsica.

Corsica's northern capital, Bastia, is the centre of commerce and industry and a thriving freight and passenger port. Commerce, more than tourism, is its main focus, providing employment for many Corsicans. Bastia's industrial sprawl, however, is offset by its aged charm. The presence of an overwhelming Italian atmosphere adds to the city's attraction. Two distinct areas comprise the city: Terra Vecchia, the old quarter, consisting of haphazard streets, flamboyant Baroque churches and lofty tenements, with their crumbling golden-grey walls set against a backdrop of fire-darkened hills; and the more orderly Terra Nova, the historic district favoured by prominent doctors, lawyers and architects. The city dates from Roman times, when a base was set up at Biguglia to the south. Under the Genoese, Bastia was the island's capital for four centuries and of major importance for the export of wine to the Italian mainland. They built a fortress (bastiglia), which gave the town its name. The Genoese also were responsible for laying the foundation for the area's prosperity by planting vines, olives, chestnut trees and other experimental crops. This resulted in an energetic and enterprising region, still a characteristic of today's northern Corsica. Although Napoleon had appointed Ajaccio the capital of the island in 1811- initiating a rivalry that still exists - Bastia established a stronger trading position with mainland France. As a result, the Nouveau Port was created in 1862 to cope with the increasing traffic with France and Italy. Bastia's economic prominence and a German division based here during World War II accounted for severe bombing attacks. Many buildings were destroyed, including much of the old governor's palace. Of the two largest towns on the island, Ajaccio and Bastia, the latter boasts a more genuine Corsican character. Visitors can experience an authentic feel of island life by wandering through the maze of narrow streets of Bastia's old quarter and by exploring its fortifications. Don't miss the vast Place Saint-Nicolas just north of the old quarter; it is the focal point of the city. Open to the sea and lined with shady trees and sidewalk cafes, it is a perfect place for people watching and for taking in the local ambiance. Pier Information The ship is scheduled to dock at the port of Bastia. The city's focal point, Place Saint-Nicolas, is a distance of 650 feet (200 metres) to walk. Taxis are generally available at the pier but it is highly recommended to book in advance if you want to be sure to get one. It is recommended to establish the fare before leaving the port. Shopping The main shopping streets, Boulevard Paoli and Rue Cesar Campinchi, are less than one half miles (500 metres) from the port terminal. Handicrafts and the area's specialties such as honey, wine and liqueurs may be of interest. Most shops are open from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Shops are closed for the day on Sundays and some shops may also close Monday mornings (some souvenirs shops may open Sundays during the high season of July-August). The local currency is the euro. Cuisine A variety of restaurants offer a good choice of eating possibilities. Some of the best restaurants are found around the Vieux Port and on the Quai des Martyrs. French cuisine and seafood feature prominently on menus as well as such Corsican specialties as wild boar, charcuterie and aziminu, a local version of bouillabaisse. Evidence of Bastia's strong Italian influence is apparent in the numerous pizza and pasta places in the Nouveau Port area. For outdoor dining and people watching, cafes around lively Place Saint-Nicolas are a perfect place. Other Sites Oratoire de Saint-Roch Located in the Terra Vecchia quarter, the chapel is a Genoese Baroque extravaganza built in 1604. The walls are covered with finely carved wooden panelling and the organ is magnificent with its decoration of gilt and wooden sculpture. Oratoire de L'Immaculee Conception Although its exterior is rather austere, the flamboyant interior of this 17th-century church with gilt and marble ceiling, frescoes and crystal chandeliers creates an ambiance of an opera house. Vieux Port Site of the original Porto Prado, the area around the Vieux Port is the most appealing part of town. Its soaring houses seem to bend inwards towards the water. Once busy with Genoese traders, the building of the ferry terminal and commercial docks have reduced much of the action at Vieux Port. Terra Nova As the administrative core of old Bastia, Terra Nova displays a distinct air of affluence. Its most impressive building is the 14th-century Governor's Palace. During the Genoese heyday the governor and the bishop lived here, entertaining foreign dignitaries and hosting massive parties. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing may be requested through the Tour Office on board, subject to the availability of English-speaking guides.

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

Ajaccio, corsica.

Considered Corsica’s primary commercial and cultural hub, the largest city and regional capital of Ajaccio is situated on the west coast of the island, approximately 644 km (400 miles) southeast of Marseille, France. Founded in 1492, vestiges of ancient Corsica in this ville impériale revolve around the city’s most famous son, Napoléon Bonaparte, whose family home—now the national museum Maison Bonaparte—pays tribute to the emperor’s historical influence.Remnants from what was originally a 12th-century Genoese colony are still visible around the Old Town near the imposing citadel and watchtower. Perfect for exploring, the luminous seaside city surrounded by snowcapped mountains and pretty beaches offers numerous sites, eateries, side streets, and a popular harbor, where sailboats and fishing vessels moor in the picturesque Tino Rossi port lined with well-established restaurants and cafés serving fresh local fare.

La Seyne-sur-Mer

Gulf of sant'amanza, corsica.

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

Caudebec-en-Caux

Caudebec-en-Caux, situated along the Seine in the Normandy region of France, is a charming town known for its medieval charm, half-timbered houses and wonderful blend of history and beauty. The impressive Gothic architecture of The Church of Saint-Pierre is a particular highlight, with its breath-taking façade and panoramic views of the Seine valley. 

Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500’s. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005. 

Brazey-en-Plaine

Cannes is pampered with the luxurious year-round climate that has made it one of the most popular resorts in Europe. Cannes was an important sentinel site for the monks who established themselves on Île St-Honorat in the Middle Ages. Its bay served as nothing more than a fishing port until in 1834 an English aristocrat, Lord Brougham, fell in love with the site during an emergency stopover with a sick daughter. He had a home built here and returned every winter for a sun cure—a ritual quickly picked up by his peers. Between the popularity of Le Train Blue transporting wealthy passengers from Calais, and the introduction in 1936 of France's first paid holidays, Cannes became the destination, a tasteful and expensive breeding ground for the upper-upscale.Cannes has been further glamorized by the ongoing success of its annual film festival, as famous as Hollywood's Academy Awards. About the closest many of us will get to feeling like a film star is a stroll here along La Croisette, the iconic promenade that gracefully curves the wave-washed sand coastline, peppered with chic restaurants and prestigious private beaches. This is precisely the sort of place for which the French invented the verb flâner (to dawdle, saunter): strewn with palm trees and poseurs, its fancy boutiques and status-symbol grand hotels—including the Carlton, the legendary backdrop to Grace Kelly in To Catch a Thief —all vying for the custom of the Louis Vuitton set. This legend is, to many, the heart and soul of the Côte d'Azur. 

Saint-Léger-sur-Dheune

Santenay, cote d'or, niederviller, calvi, corsica.

Calvi, Corsica's slice of the Riviera, has been described by author Dorothy Carrington as "an oasis of pleasure on an otherwise austere island." Calvi prospered by supplying products to Genoa; its citizens remained loyal supporters of Genoa long after the rest of the island declared independence. Calvi also claims to be the birthplace of Christopher Columbus. During the 18th century the town endured assaults from Corsican nationalists, including celebrated patriot Pasquale Paoli. Today Calvi sees a summertime invasion of tourists, drawn to the 6-km (4-mile) stretch of sandy white beach, impressive citadel overlooking the Old Town, lively restaurants, and buzzing nightlife.

Honfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's seaside towns, is a time-burnished place with a surplus of half-timber houses and cobbled streets that are lined with a stunning selection of stylish boutiques. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, where the water is fronted on one side by two-story stone houses with low, sloping roofs and on the other by tall slate-topped houses with wooden facades. Maritime expeditions (including some of the first voyages to Canada) departed from here; later, Impressionists were inspired to capture it on canvas. But the town as a whole has become increasingly crowded since the Pont de Normandie opened in 1995. Providing a direct link with Upper Normandy, the world's sixth-largest cable-stayed bridge is supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and designed to resist winds of 257 kph (160 mph).

Belle-Île-en-Mer

Although one might think that a name like “the beautiful island in the sea” might be a little too poetic, artists and painters have come to love the nature of this largest of the Brittany islands. “Les Aiguilles de Port Coton”, a famous painting by Claude Monet, depicts the wild southern coast and rocks exposed to wind and waves. The island has a ‘soft’ side too. Its northern shore has two ports and long sandy beaches. At the port of Le Palais is one of the historical gems of the island. Mentioned by Alexandre Dumas in his second book about the Three Musketeers, the Citadelle de Belle Ile had great strategic importance as access to the south of Brittany was controlled by Belle Ile and its smaller neighbours Houat and Hoed. The beautifully maintained fort is now a museum. There are other spectacular and unique fortifications along the island’s shore.

L'Isle-sur-le-Doubs

Bonifacio, corsica.

Located in the South of Corsica, Bonifacio is one of the island’s most beautiful destinations. From its breathtaking views and sandy white islands to its historic citadel, the city is a must visit for anyone travelling to the island.

Ménétréol-sous-Sancerre

Saint-étienne-des-sorts, gulf of morbihan, saint-émilion, belleville-sur-saône, port-sur-saône.

Strasbourg is a picturesque city in northeastern France, notable for its unique blend of French and German influences. Thanks to well-preserved, awe-inspiring medieval architecture such as the stunning Strasbourg Cathedral and the historic La Petite France district, Strasbourg has earned its spot on the map as a famous, must-visit European destination.

Conflans-Sainte-Honorine

Located in the Yvelines department of the Île-de-France region in France, at the confluence of the Seine and Oise rivers, Conflans-Sainte-Honorine is a charming town with a stunning waterfront and breath-taking views. Steeped in maritime history, Conflans-Sainte-Honorine is home to the Musée de la Batellerie, a museum that chronicles the history of river navigation.

Sanguinaires Islands, Corsica

Île-de-bréhat, parata peninsula, corsica.

A Roman town, situated along the Rhône in South-East France, Vienne boasts historical treasures including the Roman Temple of Augustus and Livia, the medieval Saint-Maurice Cathedral, and the Gallo-Roman Theater, seamlessly blending ancient and medieval architecture against the stunning backdrop of the Rhône Valley.

Saint-Jean-les-Deux-Jumeaux

Casabianda beach, aleria, corsica, villefranche-sur-mer.

Villefranche-Sur-Mer is located on the Côte d’Azur in Provence – known for its fields of lavender and warm weather – and is highly appreciated for its 14th Century architecture.

Lagny-sur-Marne

Saint-nazaire.

A city with long maritime history, Saint-Nazaire is mostly known for its shipbuilding industry. Rebuilt after World War II, it offers activities and sights for a wide range of interests, from history buffs to sports enthusiasts.

The city of Dijon, capital of the Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region, is world-renowned for its gastronomic delights and rich cultural heritage. Offering an enchanting blend of medieval and Renaissance architecture, Dijon is home to both the Palais des Ducs de Bourgogne and the iconic Notre-Dame de Dijon, a complement to the city's stellar reputation as a gastronomic haven. 

Marckolsheim

Collonges-au-mont-d'or.

Located in the southeast of the French Provence region, Antibes ranks among France’s oldest cities. Originally named ‘Antipolis’, Antibes was founded by Greek merchants in the 5th century. The Old City is a maze of small, flower-bedecked streets with Roman and Medieval sections. A portion of the impressive 16th-century ramparts overlooking the Mediterranean Sea still protect the heart of the Old City. Antibes is comprised of three distinct sections. The first is Antibes, which includes the Old City and ramparts. Next is Juan les Pins, a famous beach resort once praised by Francis Scott Fitzgerald and the site of the annual International Jazz Festival. Antibes’ third section is Cap d’Antibes, a wooden peninsula that has become a haunt for the rich and famous. Antibes is also home to Europe’s largest yacht harbor, Port Vauban, where the super-yachts of the wealthy are anchored. For cruise vessels, Antibes offers an opportunity to visit some of Provence’s prettiest areas. It also serves as a convenient starting point for trips to the walled-in hilltop village of St. Paul de Vence. Pier Information The ship is scheduled to anchor in the bay and tender guests ashore. The town centre is within walking distance from the tender pier. Taxis are not easy to find; therefore, it is recommended that private travel arrangements be planned in advance. Shopping The Old City offers a wide range of souvenir shops, home decoration, antiques and Provencal artifacts. Postcards are easily found, and must be sent with French postage stamps. Most shops, however, do close between 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. The local currency is the euro. Cuisine The cuisine in the southeastern part of France is considered to be varied and healthy, thanks to the common use of quality fresh products and olive oil. Fresh local fish caught daily, excellent vegetable stew, or ratatouille , and great local wines highlight the wide range of gastronomical delights that can be found here. In addition, restaurants in the harbor area typically offer the chef’s daily special, or plat du jour , on their menus. Other Sites Antibes primarily serves as a starting point for trips into the surrounding areas, which are included in the organized excursions. An early-morning stroll through the local fruit and vegetable market may also be of interest. Private Arrangements For those guests interested in touring at their leisure, we are pleased to offer .Silver Shore Privato - both half-day and full-day private arrangements by private car or van. This program may be booked in advance at silversea.com or purchased on board the ship, subject to availability. Other private arrangements for independent sightseeing may be requested through the Tour Office on board the ship.

Chalonnes-sur-Loire

Originally a little fishing village, Cherbourg has developed into a historic port designed by Vauban. This was also a strategic naval port during the Napoleonic wars; there is a marina with over 1000 moorings. “Cap de la Hague” is to the West and the “Pointe de Barfleur” to the East. This port, which belongs to Normandy, is a region that has provided inspiration for countless artists and writers, and is the land of apple orchards and rolling farmland dotted with villages of half-timbered houses. Boasting a wealth of abbeys and châteaux, as well as a superb coastline, it offers something for everyone. Cherbourg was also the first stop of RMS Titanic after it left Southampton, England. On 19 June 1864, the naval engagement between USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama took place off Cherbourg. The Battle of Cherbourg, fought in June 1944 following the Normandy Invasion, ended with the capture of Cherbourg on June 30.

Thrust out into the sea and bound to the mainland only by tenuous man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but others—most notably Jacques Cartier, who claimed Canada for Francis I in 1534—were New World explorers. Still others were corsairs, "sea dogs" paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel: legendary ones like Robert Surcouf and Duguay-Trouin helped make St-Malo rich through their pillaging, in the process earning it the nickname "the pirates' city." The St-Malo you see today isn’t quite the one they called home because a weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all of the old buildings. Restoration work was more painstaking than brilliant, but the narrow streets and granite houses of the Vieille Ville were satisfactorily recreated, enabling St-Malo to regain its role as a busy fishing port, seaside resort, and tourist destination. The ramparts that help define this city figuratively and literally are authentic, and the flames also spared houses along Rue de Pelicot in the Vieille Ville. Battalions of tourists invade this quaint part of town in summer, so arrive off-season if you want to avoid crowds.

Les Andelys

Situated in France's Normandy region, Les Andelys is an enchanting town along the banks of the Seine River. Characterised by its stunning river views and the monumental Château Gaillard, a medieval fortress built by Richard the Lionheart, the town attracts history enthusiasts and nature lovers alike thanks to its quaint streets, half-timbered houses ands vibrant market square.

Moret-Sur-Loing

Port-navalo, île-d'aix, isles-les-meldeuses, cape corse, corsica, sant' amanza, saint-mammes, tralicetu, corsica, batz island, porto, corsica.

Seurre is a peaceful escape nestled along the Saône River, offering stunning landscapes and historical charm. Renowned for well-preserved medieval architecture, such as the Saint-Martin Church, and picturesque surrounding countryside, Seurre is a haven for culture and nature enthusiasts alike to explore.

Issy-les-Moulineaux

Situated on the Garonne River, 70 miles (113 km) inland from the Atlantic, Bordeaux's origin can be traced back to the 3rd century when it was Aquitaine's Roman capital called Burdigala. From 1154 to 1453, the town prospered under the rule of the English, whose fondness for the region's red wines gave impetus to the local wine industry. At various times, Bordeaux even served as the nation's capital: in 1870, at the beginning of World War I, and for two weeks in 1940 before the Vichy government was proclaimed. Bordeaux's neo-classical architecture, wide avenues and well-tended public squares and parks lend the city a certain grandeur. Excellent museums, an imposing cathedral and a much-praised theatre add to the city's attractions. The principal highlights, clustered around the town centre, can easily be explored on foot.

<p>Situated in the Normandy region of France alongside the river Seine, Vernon is a must-visit town best known for the iconic Monet's Garden at Giverny, located just a short distance away. Within the town, art enthusiasts and nature lovers are enchanted by timber-framed houses, a medieval bridge and the awe-inspiring Collegiate Church of Our Lady.</p>

United with France only since 1860, Nice has its own history and atmosphere, which dates back 230,000 years. It was on Colline du Château (now château-less) and at the Plage des Ponchettes, in front of the Old Town, that the Greeks established a market-port in 350 BC and named it Nikaia, which would become Marseilles' chief coastal rival. The Romans established themselves a little later on the hills of Cimiez (Cemenelum), already previously occupied by Ligurians and Celts, and quickly overshadowed the waterfront port. After falling to the Saracen invasions, Nice regained power as an independent state, becoming an important port in the early Middle Ages.So cocksure did it become that in 1388, Nice, along with the hill towns behind, effectively seceded from the county of Provence, under Louis d'Anjou, and allied itself with Savoie. Thus began its liaison with the House of Savoy, and through it with Piedmont and Sardinia, it was the Comté de Nice (Nice County). This relationship lasted some 500 years, tinting the culture, architecture, and dialect in rich Italian hues.By the 19th century Nice was flourishing commercially, locked in rivalry with the neighboring shipping port of Genoa. Another source of income: the dawning of tourism, as first the English, then the Russian nobility, discovered its extraordinary climate and superb waterfront position. A parade of fine stone mansions and hotels closed into a nearly solid wall of masonry, separated from the smooth-round rocks of the beach by what was originally named Camin deis Anglés (the English Way), which of course is now the famous Promenade des Anglais. This magnificent crescent, which is seeking UNESCO recognition, is one of the noblest in France. Many of Nice's most delightful attractions—the Cours Saleya market, the Old Town streets, the Hotel Negresco, and the Palais Masséna—are on or close to this 10-km (6-mile) waterfront, making it the first stop for most visitors, while the redevelopment of Nice's port, around the other side of the Colline du Château, makes it easier for amblers who want to take in the Genoese architecture or peruse the antiques at the Puces de Nice, now part of the Promenade des 100 Antiquaires, along Quai Papacino. Nice also has the distinction of the "Family Plus" label, with free strollers, play areas, and restaurants with child-friendly activities.

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean and the country’s seventh largest city, Nantes is located on the north bank of the Loire River. Although officially no longer the capital of Brittany since Nantes was included in the Pays de Loire administrative region, many of the city’s inhabitants regard themselves still an integral part of Brittany. During medieval times, much of the city’s prosperity resulted from colonial expeditions and the slave trade. Today Nantes is the most important commercial and industrial centre in west-central France, and appears as a particularly well-managed city with fine museums and carefully tended parks and gardens. One of the museums is dedicated to Jules Verne, born here in 1828. The Loire, foundation of Nantes’ riches, has dwindled from the city centre. As recently as the 1930s the river crossed the city in seven separate channels. However, they were filled in after World War II but, fortunately, left the area’s 18th-century mansions intact. They once were the trademark of rich merchants who made their fortunes from the slave trade. French influence was brought to Nantes by the Loire and its trade from the end of the 18th century when the city became known as "Little Paris." The Place Royale and the Place Graslin were first laid out during that time. One of the most impressive landmarks is the Chateau des Ducs, most of which is preserved in its original form built by the last two rulers of independent Brittany, Francois II, and his daughter Duchess Anne, born here in 1477.

<p>Adorned with stunning Gothic architecture, Rouen is a city steeped in history situated in the Normandy region of France. Notable city landmarks include the breath-taking Rouen Cathedral, immortalised by Claude Monet's artwork, and the medieval astronomical clock, the Gros-Holorge. The charming old town paved with cobblestone and lined with half-timbered houses only serves to enhance the medieval charm, providing a fitting backdrop to the city's rich cultural heritage and associations with iconic figures such as Joan of Arc, seamlessly blending historical implication with French provincial charm.</p>

<p>Tournus, characterised by Romanesque architecture and the iconic Abbey of Saint-Philibert, is a historical town situated in the Sa&ocirc;ne-et-Loire department. Its cultural significance exudes through its well-preserved structures, and visitors find themselves immersed in vibrant local markets showcasing regional produce, or enjoying serene walks along the stunning Sa&ocirc;ne River.</p>

<p>Sitting on the banks of the Sa&ocirc;ne River is M&acirc;con, a stunning town in the Burgundy region best known for its wine production. Characterised by its enchanting streets, lively markets and iconic historic landmarks, including the Saint-Pierre Church. Not only is M&acirc;con a charming town, it is also a significant hub for the wine industry situated amidst the world-famous vineyards of Burgundy, inviting visitors to explore the local vineyards and wineries and to indulge in tastings of the region's exquisite white wines.</p>

At first glance, it really doesn't look all that impressive. There's a pretty port with cafés charging €5 for a coffee and a picturesque old town in sugared-almond hues, but there are many prettier in the hills nearby. There are sandy beaches, rare enough on the Riviera, and old-fashioned squares with plane trees and pétanque players, but these are a dime a dozen throughout Provence. So what made St-Tropez an internationally known locale? Two words: Brigitte Bardot. When this pulpeuse (voluptuous) teenager showed up in St-Tropez on the arm of Roger Vadim in 1956 to film And God Created Woman, the heads of the world snapped around. Neither the gentle descriptions of writer Guy de Maupassant (1850–93), nor the watercolor tones of Impressionist Paul Signac (1863–1935), nor the stream of painters who followed (including Matisse and Bonnard) could focus the world's attention on this seaside hamlet as did this one sensual woman in a scarf, Ray-Bans, and capris. Vanity Fair ran a big article, "Saint Tropez Babylon," detailing the over-the-top petrodollar parties, megayachts, and Beyoncé–d paparazzi. But don't be turned off: the next year, Stewart, Tabori &amp; Chang released an elegant coffee-table book, Houses of St-Tropez, packed with photos of supremely tasteful and pretty residences, many occupied by fashion designers, artists, and writers. Once a hangout for Colette, Anaïs Nin, and Françoise Sagan, the town still earns its old moniker, the "Montparnasse of the Mediterranean." Yet you might be surprised to find that this byword for billionaires is so small and insulated. The lack of train service, casinos, and chain hotels keeps it that way. Yet fame, in a sense, came too fast for St-Trop. Unlike the chic resorts farther east, it didn't have the decades-old reputation of the sort that would attract visitors all year around. For a good reason: its location on the south side of the gulf puts it at the mercy of the terrible mistral winter winds. So, in summer the crowds descend and the prices rise into the stratosphere. In July and August, you must be carefree about the sordid matter of cash. After all, at the most Dionysian nightclub in town, a glass of tap water goes for $37 and when the mojo really gets going, billionaires think nothing of "champagne-spraying" the partying crowds—think World Series celebrations but with $1,000 bottles of Roederer Cristal instead of Gatorade. Complaining about summer crowds, overpricing, and lack of customer service has become a tourist sport and yet this is what makes St-Tropez—described by the French daily newspaper Le Figaro as the place you can see "the greatest number of faces per square meter"—as intriguing as it is seductive.

The fishing village of Sète serves as gateway to Montpellier, in the North. Other noteworthy destinations in this area include Carcassone, Aigues Mortes, the Abbaye de Fontfroide, and Pezenas. For a look at the real fisherman's life, however, stay right where you are. Sète is the Mediterranean's biggest fishing port. Canals winding through town make it fun to stroll around, and there are a number of good walking paths leading to the beach (about 30 minutes to the west). Although it's small and unspectacular, Plage de la Corniche has calm, pristine waters that are perfect for swimming. For a panoramic view of the area, climb Mont St-Clair or Les Pierres Blanches and pick a beach to settle down on.

Set on a hillock overlooking a beautiful deep blue bay, Porto Vecchio, 15 miles (25km) north of Bonifacio, was rated by Scottish author James Boswell as one of "the most distinguished harbours in Europe". It was founded in 1539 as a second Genoese stronghold on the east coast, Bastia being well established in the north. The site was perfect; close to the unexploited and fertile plain, it benefited from secure high land and a sheltered harbour, although the mosquito population spread malaria and wiped out the first Ligurian settlers within months. Things began to take off mainly thanks to the cork industry, which still thrived well into the twentieth century. Today, a third of Corsica's wine is exported from Porto Vecchio, but most revenue comes from visitors. Around the centre of town explore the well-preserved fortress and the small grid of ancient streets backing onto the main place de la République. East of the square you can't miss the Porte Génoise, which frames a delightful expanse of sea and salt pans and through which you'll find the quickest route down to the modern marina, lined with cafés and hotels.

Since being designated a European Capital of Culture for 2013, with an estimated €660 million of funding in the bargain, Marseille has been in the throes of an extraordinary transformation, with no fewer than five major new arts centers, a beautifully refurbished port, revitalized neighborhoods, and a slew of new shops and restaurants. Once the underdog, this time-burnished city is now welcoming an influx of weekend tourists who have colonized entire neighborhoods and transformed them into elegant pieds-à-terre (or should we say, mer). The second-largest city in France, Marseille is one of Europe's most vibrant destinations. Feisty and fond of broad gestures, it is also as complicated and as cosmopolitan now as it was when a band of Phoenician Greeks first sailed into the harbor that is today's Vieux Port in 600 BC. Legend has it that on that same day a local chieftain's daughter, Gyptis, needed to choose a husband, and her wandering eyes settled on the Greeks' handsome commander Protis. Her dowry brought land near the mouth of the Rhône, where the Greeks founded Massalia, the most important Continental shipping port in antiquity. The port flourished for some 500 years as a typical Greek city, enjoying the full flush of classical culture, its gods, its democratic political system, its sports and theater, and its naval prowess. Caesar changed all that, besieging the city in 49 BC and seizing most of its colonies. In 1214 Marseille was seized again, this time by Charles d'Anjou, and was later annexed to France by Henri IV in 1481, but it was not until Louis XIV took the throne that the biggest transformations of the port began; he pulled down the city walls in 1666 and expanded the port to the Rive Neuve (New Riverbank). The city was devastated by plague in 1720, losing more than half its population. By the time of the Revolution, Marseille was on the rebound once again, with industries of soap manufacturing and oil processing flourishing, encouraging a wave of immigration from Provence and Italy. With the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869, Marseille became the greatest boomtown in 19th-century Europe. With a large influx of immigrants from areas as exotic as Tangiers, the city quickly acquired the multicultural population it maintains to this day.

<p>France's iconic and enchanting capital, Paris, is a globally recognised symbol of art, culture and romance, sitting along the banks of the river Seine. Home to world-famous landmarks including the Eiffel Tower, Louvre Museum and the Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris is a beacon of timeless elegance, cultural richness and historical magnitude. Affectionately named the City of Light and the City of Love, Paris enchants with its stunning boulevards, charming cafes and world-class culinary scene, with the Seine gracefully winding through the city and further enhancing the romantic allure. The artistic haven of Monmartre contributes to the city's heritage and status as a global symbol of fashion, art and culinary excellence, serving as an epitome of sophistication in a destination that seamlessly intertwines history and modernity.</p>

Corsica's northern capital, Bastia, is the centre of commerce and industry and a thriving freight and passenger port. Commerce, more than tourism, is its main focus, providing employment for many Corsicans. Bastia's industrial sprawl, however, is offset by its aged charm. The presence of an overwhelming Italian atmosphere adds to the city's attraction. Two distinct areas comprise the city: Terra Vecchia, the old quarter, consisting of haphazard streets, flamboyant Baroque churches and lofty tenements, with their crumbling golden-grey walls set against a backdrop of fire-darkened hills; and the more orderly Terra Nova, the historic district favoured by prominent doctors, lawyers and architects. The city dates from Roman times, when a base was set up at Biguglia to the south. Under the Genoese, Bastia was the island's capital for four centuries and of major importance for the export of wine to the Italian mainland. They built a fortress (bastiglia), which gave the town its name. The Genoese also were responsible for laying the foundation for the area's prosperity by planting vines, olives, chestnut trees and other experimental crops. This resulted in an energetic and enterprising region, still a characteristic of today's northern Corsica. Although Napoleon had appointed Ajaccio the capital of the island in 1811- initiating a rivalry that still exists - Bastia established a stronger trading position with mainland France. As a result, the Nouveau Port was created in 1862 to cope with the increasing traffic with France and Italy. Bastia's economic prominence and a German division based here during World War II accounted for severe bombing attacks. Many buildings were destroyed, including much of the old governor's palace. Of the two largest towns on the island, Ajaccio and Bastia, the latter boasts a more genuine Corsican character. Visitors can experience an authentic feel of island life by wandering through the maze of narrow streets of Bastia's old quarter and by exploring its fortifications. Don't miss the vast Place Saint-Nicolas just north of the old quarter; it is the focal point of the city. Open to the sea and lined with shady trees and sidewalk cafes, it is a perfect place for people watching and for taking in the local ambiance. Pier Information The ship is scheduled to dock at the port of Bastia. The city's focal point, Place Saint-Nicolas, is a distance of 650 feet (200 metres) to walk. Taxis are generally available at the pier but it is highly recommended to book in advance if you want to be sure to get one. It is recommended to establish the fare before leaving the port. Shopping The main shopping streets, Boulevard Paoli and Rue Cesar Campinchi, are less than one half miles (500 metres) from the port terminal. Handicrafts and the area's specialties such as honey, wine and liqueurs may be of interest. Most shops are open from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Shops are closed for the day on Sundays and some shops may also close Monday mornings (some souvenirs shops may open Sundays during the high season of July-August). The local currency is the euro. Cuisine A variety of restaurants offer a good choice of eating possibilities. Some of the best restaurants are found around the Vieux Port and on the Quai des Martyrs. French cuisine and seafood feature prominently on menus as well as such Corsican specialties as wild boar, charcuterie and aziminu, a local version of bouillabaisse. Evidence of Bastia's strong Italian influence is apparent in the numerous pizza and pasta places in the Nouveau Port area. For outdoor dining and people watching, cafes around lively Place Saint-Nicolas are a perfect place. Other Sites Oratoire de Saint-Roch Located in the Terra Vecchia quarter, the chapel is a Genoese Baroque extravaganza built in 1604. The walls are covered with finely carved wooden panelling and the organ is magnificent with its decoration of gilt and wooden sculpture. Oratoire de L'Immaculee Conception Although its exterior is rather austere, the flamboyant interior of this 17th-century church with gilt and marble ceiling, frescoes and crystal chandeliers creates an ambiance of an opera house. Vieux Port Site of the original Porto Prado, the area around the Vieux Port is the most appealing part of town. Its soaring houses seem to bend inwards towards the water. Once busy with Genoese traders, the building of the ferry terminal and commercial docks have reduced much of the action at Vieux Port. Terra Nova As the administrative core of old Bastia, Terra Nova displays a distinct air of affluence. Its most impressive building is the 14th-century Governor's Palace. During the Genoese heyday the governor and the bishop lived here, entertaining foreign dignitaries and hosting massive parties. Private arrangements for independent sightseeing may be requested through the Tour Office on board, subject to the availability of English-speaking guides.

Bordeaux as a whole, rather than any particular points within it, is what you'll want to visit in order to understand why Victor Hugo described it as Versailles plus Antwerp, and why the painter Francisco de Goya, when exiled from his native Spain, chose it as his last home (he died here in 1828). The capital of southwest France and the region's largest city, Bordeaux remains synonymous with the wine trade: wine shippers have long maintained their headquarters along the banks of the Garonne, while buyers from around the world arrive for the huge biennial Vinexpo show (held in odd-number years).Bordeaux is, admittedly, a less exuberant city than many others in France, but lively and stylish elements are making a dent in its conservative veneer. The cleaned-up riverfront is said by some, after a bottle or two, to exude an elegance reminiscent of St. Petersburg, and that aura of 18th-century élan also permeates the historic downtown sector—“le vieux Bordeaux"—where fine shops invite exploration. To the south of the city center are old docklands undergoing renewal—one train station has now been transformed into a big multiplex movie theater—but the area is still a bit shady. To get a feel for the historic port of Bordeaux, take the 90-minute boat trip that leaves Quai Louis-XVIII every weekday afternoon, or the regular passenger ferry that plies the Garonne between Quai Richelieu and the Pont d'Aquitaine in summer. A nice time to stroll around the city center is the first Sunday of the month, when it's pedestrian-only and vehicles are banned.

<p>Caudebec-en-Caux, situated along the Seine in the Normandy region of France, is a charming town known for its medieval charm, half-timbered houses and wonderful blend of history and beauty. The impressive Gothic architecture of The Church of Saint-Pierre is a particular highlight, with its breath-taking fa&ccedil;ade and panoramic views of the Seine valley.&nbsp;</p>

Le Havre, founded by King Francis I of France in 1517, is located inUpper Normandy on the north bank of the mouth of the River Seine, which isconsidered the most frequented waterway in the world. Its port is ranked thesecond largest in France. The city was originally built on marshland andmudflats that were drained in the 1500’s. During WWII most of Le Havre wasdestroyed by Allied bombing raids. Post war rebuilding of the city followed thedevelopment plans of the well-known Belgian architect Auguste Perre. Thereconstruction was so unique that the entire city was listed as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site in 2005.&nbsp;

Cannes is pampered with the luxurious year-round climate that has made it one of the most popular resorts in Europe. Cannes was an important sentinel site for the monks who established themselves on Île St-Honorat in the Middle Ages. Its bay served as nothing more than a fishing port until in 1834 an English aristocrat, Lord Brougham, fell in love with the site during an emergency stopover with a sick daughter. He had a home built here and returned every winter for a sun cure—a ritual quickly picked up by his peers. Between the popularity of Le Train Blue transporting wealthy passengers from Calais, and the introduction in 1936 of France's first paid holidays, Cannes became the destination, a tasteful and expensive breeding ground for the upper-upscale.Cannes has been further glamorized by the ongoing success of its annual film festival, as famous as Hollywood's Academy Awards. About the closest many of us will get to feeling like a film star is a stroll here along La Croisette, the iconic promenade that gracefully curves the wave-washed sand coastline, peppered with chic restaurants and prestigious private beaches. This is precisely the sort of place for which the French invented the verb flâner (to dawdle, saunter): strewn with palm trees and poseurs, its fancy boutiques and status-symbol grand hotels—including the Carlton, the legendary backdrop to Grace Kelly in To Catch a Thief —all vying for the custom of the Louis Vuitton set. This legend is, to many, the heart and soul of the Côte d'Azur.&nbsp;

Calvi, Corsica's slice of the Riviera, has been described by author Dorothy Carrington as "an oasis of pleasure on an otherwise austere island." Calvi prospered by supplying products to Genoa; its citizens remained loyal supporters of Genoa long after the rest of the island declared independence. Calvi also claims to be the birthplace of Christopher Columbus. During the 18th century the town endured assaults from Corsican nationalists, including celebrated patriot Pasquale Paoli. Today Calvi sees a summertime invasion of tourists, drawn to the 6-km (4-mile) stretch of sandy white beach, impressive citadel overlooking the Old Town, lively restaurants, and buzzing nightlife.

Honfleur, the most picturesque of the Côte Fleurie's seaside towns, is a time-burnished place with a surplus of half-timber houses and cobbled streets that are lined with a stunning selection of stylish boutiques. Much of its Renaissance architecture remains intact—especially around the 17th-century Vieux Bassin harbor, where the water is fronted on one side by two-story stone houses with low, sloping roofs and on the other by tall slate-topped houses with wooden facades. Maritime expeditions (including some of the first voyages to Canada) departed from here; later, Impressionists were inspired to capture it on canvas. But the town as a whole has become increasingly crowded since the Pont de Normandie opened in 1995. Providing a direct link with Upper Normandy, the world's sixth-largest cable-stayed bridge is supported by two concrete pylons taller than the Eiffel Tower and designed to resist winds of 257 kph (160 mph).

<p>Strasbourg is a picturesque city in northeastern France, notable for its unique blend of French and German influences. Thanks to well-preserved, awe-inspiring medieval architecture such as the stunning Strasbourg Cathedral and the historic La Petite France district, Strasbourg has earned its spot on the map as a famous, must-visit European destination.</p>

<p>Located in the Yvelines department of the &Icirc;le-de-France region in France, at the confluence of the Seine and Oise rivers, Conflans-Sainte-Honorine is a charming town with a stunning waterfront and breath-taking views. Steeped in maritime history, Conflans-Sainte-Honorine is home to the Mus&eacute;e de la Batellerie, a museum that chronicles the history of river navigation.</p>

<p>A Roman town, situated along the Rh&ocirc;ne in South-East France, Vienne boasts historical treasures including the Roman Temple of Augustus and Livia, the medieval Saint-Maurice Cathedral, and the Gallo-Roman Theater, seamlessly blending ancient and medieval architecture against the stunning backdrop of the Rh&ocirc;ne Valley.</p>

<p>The city of Dijon, capital of the Bourgogne-Franche-Comt&eacute; region, is world-renowned for its gastronomic delights and rich cultural heritage. Offering an enchanting blend of medieval and Renaissance architecture, Dijon is home to both the Palais des Ducs de Bourgogne and the iconic Notre-Dame de Dijon, a complement to the city's stellar reputation as a gastronomic haven.&nbsp;</p>

Thrust out into the sea and bound to the mainland only by tenuous man-made causeways, romantic St-Malo has built a reputation as a breeding ground for phenomenal sailors. Many were fishermen, but others—most notably Jacques Cartier, who claimed Canada for Francis I in 1534—were New World explorers. Still others were corsairs, "sea dogs" paid by the French crown to harass the Limeys across the Channel: legendary ones like Robert Surcouf and Duguay-Trouin helped make St-Malo rich through their pillaging, in the process earning it the nickname "the pirates' city." The St-Malo you see today isn’t quite the one they called home because a weeklong fire in 1944, kindled by retreating Nazis, wiped out nearly all of the old buildings. Restoration work was more painstaking than brilliant, but the narrow streets and granite houses of the Vieille Ville were satisfactorily recreated, enabling St-Malo to regain its role as a busy fishing port, seaside resort, and tourist destination. The ramparts that help define this city figuratively and literally are authentic, and the flames also spared houses along Rue de Pelicot in the Vieille Ville. Battalions of tourists invade this quaint part of town in summer, so arrive off-season if you want to avoid crowds.

<p>Situated in France's Normandy region, Les Andelys is an enchanting town along the banks of the Seine River. Characterised by its stunning river views and the monumental Ch&acirc;teau Gaillard, a medieval fortress built by Richard the Lionheart, the town attracts history enthusiasts and nature lovers alike thanks to its quaint streets, half-timbered houses ands vibrant market square.</p>

<p>Seurre is a peaceful escape nestled along the Sa&ocirc;ne River, offering stunning landscapes and historical charm. Renowned for well-preserved medieval architecture, such as the Saint-Martin Church, and picturesque surrounding countryside, Seurre is a haven for culture and nature enthusiasts alike to explore.</p>

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Explore Avignon’s Palace of the Popes and savor Lyon’s culinary heritage. Toast centuries-old vineyards and luxuriate in Paris’s sophistication. Walk in Joan of Arc’s footsteps at Rouen. Pay your respects at Normandy’s World War II beaches. Art, cuisine, style, joie de vivre —if you love everything français , this is for you: a 15-day journey that combines our popular Lyon & Provence and Paris & the Heart of Normandy cruises into one tour de force.

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Bordeaux River Cruises Down The Garonne

River cruises out of bordeaux along the garonne bordeaux ~ cadillac/sauternes ~ blaye/medoc ~ libourne/st emilion.

If idyllic countryside, steeped in fascinating history, rich in gastronomy and offering some of the world’s best wine appeals, then a Bordeaux River Cruise should be top of your list.

Your river cruising enquiry will be sent to Laurie Reitman who has over 20 years of experience, traveled all over the world, and cruised on more than 15 of the top river and ocean lines.

Speak direct to Laurie by calling 469-269-3763 . She will be delighted to tell you more and find you your perfect river cruise in France. Please tell Laurie that you’re making contact through French Waterways.

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Bordeaux to Bordeaux River Cruise

Bordeaux , the capital of New Aquitaine in southwest France, sits on the Garonne River, and all cruises begin and end at its quaysides. Effortlessly elegant and cosmopolitan, Bordeaux sets the scene for the days to come. With magnificent neoclassical buildings, a vibrant riverfront and exceptional dining and shopping, it’s a city in which to immerse oneself.

Bordeaux Wine and Cognac

Beyond the enchanting attractions of Bordeaux, you will discover that river cruises in this fertile region take you to some of the finest wine ports and châteaux in France . Cruising Bordeaux’s stunning Gironde Estuary, and the Dordogne and the Garonne rivers, you will discover places that hold legendary status in the wine world , from Saint-Émilion and Pomerol , to Sauternes and Médoc – tasting some of the world’s finest wines and sampling the best regional produce on the way.

Blaye is the nearest port to Cognac , although the vineyards here on the right bank of the Gironde also produce fabulous wine too. Wandering around its 17th century citadel, however, you will quickly find this is a fabulous destination in its own right.

Libourne and St Emilion

A visit to the small town of Libourne and its bustling, foodie market will give you a real taste of authentic French life. Libourne is also the gateway to Saint-Émilion , where you won’t fail to be enchanted by 12th century churches, ancient catacombs and simply superb wine. Some say Saint-Émilion, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is even more beautiful than Bordeaux, but we’ll let you be the judge of that.

Cadillac is a picturesque fortified town dating back to 1280, but the star attraction is the majestic 17th century château that epitomises aristocratic life of the time. Wine lovers too will be delighted with an excursion to the vineyards of Sauternes and the chance to sample this legendary dessert wine.

Aquitaine countryside

Some Bordeaux to Bordeaux cruises also visit the beautifully sheltered Arcachon Bay, renowned for its oyster farming, where a trip to the surrounding fishing villages to eat just-caught oysters is one that will not be forgotten.

So, whether you are truffle hunting, cognac blending, wine tasting or simply sitting back enjoying superb food and beautiful Aquitaine countryside, a cruise from Bordeaux is something you are sure to savour for a long time to come.

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The New River Cruise Ships and Sailings We’re Most Excited About This Year

The world’s newest river cruise ships are delivering passengers to beautiful destinations in europe, asia, and south america in style. and they’re leaving less of a footprint, too..

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A rendering of the sun deck with a hot tub and white lounge chairs on the forthcoming "Amadeus Nova" river cruise ship

The forthcoming Amadeus Nova is bringing sustainable luxury to the Danube.

Courtesy of Amadeus River Cruises

A new year is a good time to set new goals, and for river cruise lines that has meant putting a stronger focus on developing more eco-friendly ships and products for the year ahead.

River cruise companies are joining a growing industry-wide effort to reduce carbon emissions by implementing new sustainability practices. As demand for greener trips grows, companies are aiming to keep pace.

From ships equipped with cleaner, more energy-efficient engines to new vegan menus and sailings that explore destinations rich in biodiversity, here are five new river cruise ships, itineraries, and programs that are putting sustainability front and center in 2024.

“Amadeus Nova,” a model for more sustainable European river cruising

Aerial view of Germany's Wachau Valley, with calm, curving Danube River and green hills

Among the destinations the Amadeus Nova will explore will be Germany’s Wachau Valley.

Courtesy of Thomas Peham/Unsplash

In April, the Illinois-based river cruise line with Austrian roots, Amadeus River Cruises , will launch the new Amadeus Nova , which will introduce new energy-efficient technology aimed at lowering the line’s carbon footprint on Europe’s inland waterways. The 158-passenger vessel will feature hybrid diesel-electric drive, a powerful battery, and upgraded engines with filters and catalysts aimed at reducing emissions and eliminating pollutants. Solar panels will provide the electricity onboard, while heat recovery systems and insulated glass will enhance energy efficiency. All of these features will also translate into a quieter sailing experience for guests with less vibration felt overall due to an upgraded propeller system.

In addition to the green innovations, Amadaus Nova will also feature the line’s trademark amenities onboard, including a spa and fitness center, a heated pool on the sun deck, and the signature Café Vienna, a Viennese-inspired coffeehouse featuring a variety of hot beverages and pastries.

The Amadeus Nova will sail on the Danube River beginning in April, offering five itineraries ranging from 8- to 11-day cruises, with fares starting at $1,926 per person. Highlights will include stops in the Wachau Valley, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, and Bucharest.

Antara launches catamarans in India’s Bhitarkanika National Park

A broad, flat waterway between green banks of Bhitarkanika National Park

Explore the verdant wilderness of Bhitarkanika National Park from the vantage point of an intimate catamaran.

Photo by Shutterstock

What better way to launch a new river cruise destination in one of India’s most ecologically rich national parks than with a new fleet of intimate ships, thoughtfully designed to leave as little impact as possible on its natural surroundings?

Enter the new catamarans from Antara River Cruises , a pair of first-of-their-kind vessels for the luxury Indian river cruise company and a stark departure from its typical, larger 56-passenger river boats that sail on the Ganges River, often between Varanasi and Kolkata. Antara’s catamarans are sleek in design and small in size, with only two identical suites onboard, which can accommodate up to four people; they feature queen beds and private bathrooms, along with a lounge, dining area, and sun deck.

As with the rest of Antara’s fleet, the catamarans prioritize sustainability. They are custom built to run on a hybrid solar electric and fuel-powered system and are equipped with biochemical toilets and water purifiers onboard. The ships sail deep into the network of the Brahmani, Baitarani, and Mahanadi rivers in the Bhitarkanika National Park in eastern India, home to saltwater crocodiles, more than 320 species of birds, and India’s largest mangrove system.

There are two itineraries available on the two vessels: the three-night “Cruising in Bhitarkanika” voyage and the four-night “Amazon of the East” journey; both sail roundtrip from Gupti in Odisha. Departures kicked off this month with fares starting at $1,080 per person for both itineraries.

AmaWaterway’s “AmaMagdalena” explores the biodiversity of Colombia’s Magdalena River

Sunset over the colonial coastal city of Cartegena, Colombia, including historic church with cupola, with modern skyscrapers in distance

The Magdalena River cruises all either begin or end in the colonial coastal city of Cartegena.

Luxury cruisers will have a new river to explore when AmaWaterways debuts the first of two ships on Colombia’s Magdalena River. Sailings on the 60-passenger AmaMagdalena , which launches in November 2024, will immerse travelers in the diverse populations, cultures, and music along the river that explorers sailed to pave the way for trade and communications between the Andes and the Caribbean. Today, the river basin is home to about 80 percent of Colombia’s population, which has a blend of people with Indigenous, European, and African ancestry.

Colombia is also rich with biodiversity—home to more than 1,900 species of birds and 150 types of mammals—and AmaWaterways aims to prioritize sustainability in its ship design in order to leave as little impact on its natural surroundings as possible. The AmaMagdalena will feature 30 staterooms, all with the balconies, a main restaurant, fitness center, three spa treatment rooms, and a sun deck with whirlpool. AmaWaterways will be the first major river cruise line to launch in Colombia. But it probably won’t be the last. Abercrombie & Kent, which purchased the luxury Crystal Cruises brand, said it is also looking to put a ship or two on the river.

A eight-day sailing between Baranquilla and Cartagena includes a stop in Palenque, the first free city in Colombia, bird-watching in Magangue, and a visit to Nueva Venecia, a village of stilt houses, with fares starting at $3,599 per person.

“Avalon Alegria” brings greener sailings to Portugal’s Douro River Valley

A rendering of a beige stateroom, with floor-to-ceiling glass door on the "Avalon Alegria"

The Avalon Alegria will offer priceless Douro River Valley views from staterooms with beds facing floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors.

Courtesy of Avalon Waterways

For the first time, river cruise line Avalon Waterways will begin sailing in Portugal’s Douro River Valley in April 2024, launching a new ship there along with two itineraries. The Avalon Alegria will be able to accommodate 102 guests across 14 deluxe staterooms and 37 Panorama Suites, all with beds that face the floor-to-ceiling windows/doors and provide scenic views of the rolling hills and vineyards passing by.

Expect to find the familiar elements of Avalon’s Suite Ships onboard Alegria , from its relaxed luxury design to its sustainable features. The Suite Ships are built with technology to reduce energy consumption and emissions; they are also paper-free, using digital communications through its AvalonGo app with guests onboard for shore excursions, cruise updates, and menu items. The line uses locally sourced produce and other ingredients to further reduce its carbon footprint while sailing and to support local farming communities.

Itineraries available on the Avalon Alegria include the 8-day “Vida Portugal: Vineyards & Villages Along the Douro ,” which sails roundtrip from Porto, visiting everything from the birthplace of Mateus Rosé in Amarante to the artisanal markets of Pinhão. An 11-day version of this itinerary begins with a three-night extension in Lisbon, before boarding the 7-night cruise in Porto.

Fares for the 8-day “Vida Portugal” itinerary begin at $3,299, while fares for the 11-day version start at $4,248.

Vegan-friendly options with AmaWaterways

A white plate filled will colorful vegetables, figs, and pomegranate seeds, viewed from overhead, next to fork and knife

With more travelers looking for plant-based options, AmaWaterways is making vegan and vegetarian meals more widely available across its fleet.

Courtesy of Louis Hansel/Unsplash

River cruise line AmaWaterways , known for its upscale ships and excellent service, is expanding the vegan options onboard all of its ships in 2024 with a larger roster of plant-based menu items in response to increased demand.

Highlights of the new plant-based offerings begin with the appetizers, including an oven-roasted eggplant bruschetta with herbs or a garlic chickpeas bruschetta with balsamic vinegar; savory main courses like a slow-braised vegetable stew featuring portobello mushrooms, carrots, and cauliflower or grilled cauliflower and sweet potato paired with lemon salsa verde, cherry tomatoes, beans, and broccoli. For dessert, a nut-crusted pumpkin mousse infused with dates promises to provide a sweet finish to this sustainable culinary journey.

Jeri Clausing contributed to this story.

Family Beach Fire.jpg

52 Perfect Days

The Enchanting World of Scenic River Cruising: Is it Right for You?

A s the sun dips below the horizon, casting a warm glow over tranquil waters, the allure of river cruises beckons those seeking a vacation that transcends the ordinary. In recent years, scenic river cruising has emerged as a popular alternative to their ocean-faring counterparts, promising an intimate, immersive, and enchanting experience that meanders through the heart of picturesque landscapes.

This article shares what you need to know if you are thinking of booking a river cruise, what to pack for a river cruise and why these trips are filled with unique charm and cultural immersion.

In contrast to the vast expanses of river cruises, Mekong Delta cruises unfold along winding waterways, cradling some of the world’s most captivating destinations.

Whether it’s the majestic Danube navigating through Europe’s historic cities or the mystical Mekong revealing the treasures of Southeast Asia, river cruises promise a close connection with the landscapes they traverse. The leisurely pace enables travelers to relish every detail of the scenery, from charming villages nestled along the riverbanks to panoramic views of vineyards, castles, and ancient temples.

Why Small Ships Are Better

The size of river cruise vessels contributes significantly to the allure of these journeys. Unlike massive ocean liners, river cruise ships are designed to navigate narrower waterways, fostering an intimate and sociable atmosphere.

With a more limited number of passengers on board, travelers find themselves amidst a community rather than a crowd. This intimate setting encourages camaraderie, making it easier for passengers to connect, share experiences, and form lasting friendships against the backdrop of breathtaking landscapes.

Cultural Immersion with Small Ship Travel

Cultural immersion is a hallmark of river cruises, as these voyages often dock at the heart of cities and towns along the route. Passengers can disembark to explore historic sites, indulge in local cuisine, and engage with the authentic rhythm of life in each destination.

Whether strolling through the cobbled streets of medieval towns or visiting ancient temples tucked away in lush landscapes, river cruises offer a passport to cultural discovery, providing a deeper understanding of the places visited.

One of the defining features of river cruises is the emphasis on curated excursions and personalized experiences. Instead of a one-size-fits-all approach, these cruises often provide a menu of shore excursions that cater to diverse interests.

Whether it’s a wine-tasting tour through the vineyards of Bordeaux, a cycling adventure along the banks of the Rhine , or a historical exploration of ancient temples in Cambodia, passengers have the flexibility to tailor their journey to align with their passions.

Dining on Small Ships

The culinary experience aboard river cruises is a voyage in itself, a gastronomic odyssey that mirrors the regions traversed. Local flavors take center stage as onboard chefs source fresh, regional ingredients to craft a menu that reflects the cultural tapestry of the destinations.

Dining becomes an immersive experience, allowing passengers to savor the essence of each port of call through its culinary delights, creating a sensorial connection with the journey.

While river cruises provide a haven for relaxation and cultural enrichment, they also serve as gateways to regions that are often inaccessible by larger vessels. Navigating inland waterways, river cruises reach destinations that are off the beaten path, offering passengers the opportunity to explore hidden gems that remain untouched by mass tourism. This sense of exclusivity adds a layer of allure, as travelers become pioneers in discovering the unexplored corners of the world.

The environmental consciousness of river cruises is a resonant theme in an era where sustainable travel is gaining prominence. These cruises, with their smaller vessels and reduced ecological impact, align with the growing desire among travelers to explore the world responsibly. River cruise companies often implement eco-friendly practices, emphasizing the importance of preserving the pristine beauty of the landscapes through which they navigate.

However, amidst the serene currents of river cruises, challenges do surface. The limited size of the vessels, while fostering intimacy, also means fewer onboard amenities compared to ocean cruises. Finding the delicate balance between cultural immersion and tourist impact poses an ongoing challenge. Moreover, as the popularity of river cruises rises, concerns about overcrowding at popular ports of call demand thoughtful management.

Pioneering Sustainable Travel

As the world embraces the importance of sustainable travel, river cruises emerge as pioneers in this endeavor. With smaller vessels and a reduced ecological footprint, these cruises align with the growing environmental consciousness among travelers. Onboard practices, such as waste reduction and responsible sourcing, contribute to the preservation of the pristine landscapes through which river cruises navigate.

The Evolution of River Cruise Amenities

While the intimate atmosphere of river cruises is cherished, the evolution of amenities becomes a focal point. Cruise companies are adapting, offering a balance between cultural immersion and onboard luxuries. From spa services to gourmet dining, the modern river cruise aims to provide a holistic experience that caters to the diverse preferences of passengers.

Managing Popularity: A Delicate Balance

As river cruises gain popularity, managing the influx of visitors at ports of call becomes crucial. Thoughtful management is essential to prevent overcrowding and ensure that the charm of each destination is preserved. Striking a delicate balance between accessibility and conservation is an ongoing challenge for the industry.

Savoring Moments of Serenity

In the hustle and bustle of the modern world, river cruises offer a retreat into moments of serenity. Whether it’s a quiet evening on the deck, watching the landscapes pass by, or a shared meal with newfound friends, these cruises provide opportunities for reflection and connection. The gentle currents become a metaphor for the unhurried pace of life embraced on a river cruise.

Infinite Horizons: The Future of River Cruises

As technology advances and sustainable practices become more ingrained in travel, the future of river cruises holds exciting possibilities. From innovative eco-friendly designs for vessels to enhanced digital experiences for passengers, the industry continues to evolve. The allure of river cruises, rooted in cultural exploration and tranquility, remains timeless, promising a voyage into the heart of enchanting landscapes for generations to come.

The Conclusion: A Tranquil Convergence

River cruises beckon as a tranquil odyssey that goes beyond the allure of vast oceans, offering an intimate connection with the heart of diverse landscapes. From the winding waterways of Europe to the exotic rivers of Asia, these voyages promise not just a journey from point A to B but an immersive exploration of culture, cuisine, and camaraderie.

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As the sun dips below the horizon, casting a warm glow over tranquil waters, the allure of river cruises beckons those seeking a vacation that transcends the ordinary. In recent years, scenic river cruising has emerged as a popular alternative to their ocean-faring counterparts, promising an intimate, immersive, and enchanting experience that meanders through the heart of picturesque landscapes. This article shares what you need to know if you are thinking of booking a river cruise, what to pack for a river cruise and why these trips are filled with unique charm and cultural immersion. In contrast to the vast […]

  • Expeditions

Press Release

Viking opens 2026 ocean voyages and announces new extensions, due to strong demand, viking opens bookings for newest ocean ship and itineraries through 2026.

Los Angeles (January 24, 2023) – Viking® ( www.viking.com ) today announced that its 2026 ocean voyages are now open for booking. With many 2024 dates already sold out and 2025 departures selling fast, strong demand among North American travelers has led to an early opening of 2026 departures across the company’s ocean fleet. Viking also announced voyages for its newest ship, the Viking Vesta ®, which is scheduled to join the award-winning fleet in July 2025. The 998-guest sister ship will spend her inaugural season sailing popular itineraries in the Mediterranean and Scandinavia.

“We have always done things a bit differently. At Viking, we are contrarians. We design travel experiences for thinking people, with no children and no casinos,” said Torstein Hagen, Chairman of Viking. “We are pleased that our approach has resonated with so many—and with the addition of the Viking Vesta to our ocean fleet, we look forward to introducing even more curious travelers to the Viking way of exploration.”

Viking is rated the #1 Ocean Line by both Condé Nast Traveler and Travel + Leisure . With more than 80 ocean itineraries offered, examples of the most popular voyages include:

  • Viking Homelands (15 days; Stockholm—Bergen) – Sail historic waters and discover more of Scandinavia with overnights in Stockholm, Oslo and scenic Bergen. See charming Ålborg and Gdańsk, and visit the grand cities of Berlin and Copenhagen. Witness breathtaking scenery from your ship as she glides through majestic Norwegian fjords in the legendary homelands of the Vikings.
  • Iconic Western Mediterranean (8 days; Barcelona—Rome) – France’s famed southern coast and Italy’s Renaissance treasures take center stage on this eight-day Mediterranean sojourn. Immerse yourself in Catalonian and Tuscan art, architecture and history during overnights in Barcelona and Tuscany. In the South of France, call on historic Montpellier and picturesque Marseille, and visit Monte Carlo, Monaco’s glamorous city by the sea.
  • Empires of the Mediterranean (10 days; Venice—Athens) – Ten days. Nine magnificent destinations. One epic journey. Sail the Adriatic and Aegean, taking in all the riches of this fabled region. On an exploration bookended by iconic Venice and Athens, discover the ancient ruins of Olympia and the Acropolis. Explore the medieval warrens of Zadar and Dubrovnik, and admire the famed whitewashed villages of Santorini. Delight in the beauty of Corfu and be captivated by Koper, the gateway to picturesque Slovenia.
  • British Isles Explorer (15 days; Bergen—London) – Immerse yourself in the British Isles with overnight stays in Bergen, Norway, and Greenwich, England. Discover the legendary Highlands and Western Isles of Scotland and its capital, Edinburgh. Visit the Shetland and Orkney Islands, and contrast modern Belfast with traditional Dublin. Witness Welsh culture in Snowdonia. In England, visit maritime Liverpool, see historic Dover and enjoy a tour of London.
  • West Indies Explorer (11 days; San Juan roundtrip) – Set sail on a roundtrip voyage from San Juan to explore the colorful Caribbean. Start deep in the heart of this tropical paradise and avoid the long sea days associated with most Caribbean cruises—allowing you to visit more ports and spend more time discovering rich island cultures. Immerse yourself in the British, French and Dutch cultures of the Lesser Antilles as you cruise azure waters from Tortola and St. Lucia to Dominica, St. Martin and St. Thomas.

Additionally, Viking has announced six new immersive Pre and Post Extensions beginning in 2024 and 2025. Pre and Post extensions are increasingly popular with travelers; over 45 percent of all Viking guests choose to add such extensions to their voyage. The new, fully guided, three-night extensions are offered in the iconic cities of Barcelona, Istanbul, London, Rome, Stockholm and Venice and feature Privileged Access® to museums, local cuisine for lunches and dinners, market visits and cooking classes—as well as more time to personalize the journey with optional excursions. The new extensions include:

  • Best of Barcelona – Explore Cataluña’s capital, the beautiful city of Barcelona. Admire views from atop Montserrat, revel in the spectacle of La Sagrada Familia and roam the storied Gothic Quarter. Additionally, enjoy time at your leisure or join fellow travelers for optional excursions to further immerse in local culture.
  • Best of Istanbul – Immerse yourself in the history of the Ottoman Empire with visits to the Topkapi Palace, the Blue Mosque and Hagia Sophia. Explore the expansive Grand Bazaar and a spice market, and savor Turkish culinary delights at a Michelin Star restaurant and farm-to-table experience in an idyllic setting.
  • Best of London – Explore the iconic sites of London and enjoy Privileged Access experiences at the British Museum and St. Paul’s Cathedral. Tantalize your taste buds at Borough Market with TV chef and culinary author, Celia Brooks, and spend an evening at the Tower of London as you witness a centuries-old ceremony.
  • Best of Rome – Explore more of Rome, the “Eternal City,” during an extended stay. Stroll narrow streets and vibrant piazzas, with every corner of the city revealing a piece of history. Visit Vatican City and its museums, see the sights of ancient Rome and learn the art of making pasta the Italian way.
  • Best of Stockholm – Immerse in the vibrant culture and natural beauty of Stockholm. Admire the art gracing its subway stations and historic City Hall, cruise its scenic archipelago and savor a taste of traditional cuisine at Östermalmshallen. Optional excursions offer you a chance to explore more of Sweden’s elegant capital city.
  • Best of Venice – Experience Venice as few do, avoiding the crowds for an intimate look at this famous city. Cruise the Grand Canal at night, take a morning stroll through the bustling Rialto Fish Market and admire historic landmarks around iconic St. Mark’s Square after hours during this unforgettable sojourn.

The Viking Vesta

Classified as a small ship, the Viking Vesta has a gross tonnage of 54,300 tons, with 499 staterooms that can host 998 guests. She will join the award-winning ocean fleet of sister ships, which includes the Viking Star ®, the Viking Sea ®, the Viking Sky ®, the Viking Orion ®, the Viking Jupiter ®, the Viking Venus ®, the Viking Mars ®, the Viking Neptune ® and the Viking Saturn ®. The new Viking Vela ® is scheduled to debut in December 2024.

Booking Details

From now through January 31, 2024, Viking is offering North American travelers the Discover More Sale, with up to free international airfare, special fares and a $25 deposit—with additional savings for both new and returning guests—on all-inclusive river, ocean and expedition voyages. Call Viking toll free at 1-855-8-VIKING (1-855-884-5464) or contact a travel advisor for details.

Media Assets

For more information about Viking, or for images and b-roll, please contact [email protected] .

About Viking

Viking was founded in 1997 and provides destination-focused journeys on rivers, oceans and lakes around the world. Designed for curious travelers with interests in science, history, culture and cuisine, Chairman Torstein Hagen often says Viking offers experiences for The Thinking Person™. Viking has more than 450 awards to its name, including being rated #1 for Rivers, #1 for Oceans and #1 for Expeditions by Condé Nast Traveler in the 2023 Readers’ Choice Awards. Viking is also rated at the top of its categories for rivers, oceans and expeditions by Travel + Leisure . No other travel company has simultaneously received the same honors by both publications. For additional information, contact Viking at 1-800-2-VIKING (1-800-284-5464) or visit www.viking.com . For Viking’s award-winning enrichment channel, visit www.viking.tv .

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January Sale:   The world is waiting at   Up to 70% OFF

River Cruises from Nice

A cruise starting in Nice is a great way to experience river cruising. We have 42 cruises that range from 8 days up to 21 days in length. The most popular time for river cruises leaving Nice is August.

42 Nice river cruises with reviews

Corsica reveals its hidden treasures (port-to-port package) Tour

  • River Cruise
  • Ocean Cruise

Corsica reveals its hidden treasures (port-to-port package)

Nice & Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal Tour

Nice & Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal

Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal (Start Nice, End Porto) Tour

Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal (Start Nice, End Porto)

La Dolce Vita along the Italian coastline (port-to-port package) Tour

La Dolce Vita along the Italian coastline (port-to-port package)

Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2025 Tour

Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2025

Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice & 2 Nights in Paris for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2025 Tour

  • Wine tasting

Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice & 2 Nights in Paris for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2025

Nice to Paris & Sensations of Lyon and Provence Tour

Nice to Paris & Sensations of Lyon and Provence

Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2024 Tour

Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2024

A Culinary Experience on Rhine & Rhône Revealed with 2 Nights in Nice (Northbound) Tour

A Culinary Experience on Rhine & Rhône Revealed with 2 Nights in Nice (Northbound)

Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal & Lisbon Tour

Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal & Lisbon

Grand France with 2 Nights in Nice for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2024 Tour

Grand France with 2 Nights in Nice for Wine Lovers (Northbound) 2024

A Culinary Experience in Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice & 2 Nights in Paris (Northbound) 2025 Tour

A Culinary Experience in Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice & 2 Nights in Paris (Northbound) 2025

Grand France with 2 Nights in Nice and 3 nights in London 80th Anniversary of D-Day WWII Remembrance & History Cruise Tour

Grand France with 2 Nights in Nice and 3 nights in London 80th Anniversary of D-Day WWII Remembrance & History Cruise

A Culinary Experience in Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice (Northbound) 2025 Tour

A Culinary Experience in Burgundy & Provence with 2 Nights in Nice (Northbound) 2025

A Culinary Experience in Grand France with 2 Nights in Nice & 3 Nights in London (Northbound) 2025 Tour

A Culinary Experience in Grand France with 2 Nights in Nice & 3 Nights in London (Northbound) 2025

River cruise from nice reviews.

"Excellent crew, great food, interesting tours, superb entertainment and first rate service and hospitality. Yup won’t find a better cruising experience."

Travel Styles

River cruise from nice.

  • to Paris (14)
  • to London (6)
  • to Amsterdam (6)
  • to Chalon sur Saone (5)
  • France Travel Guide | All You Need to Know
  • Best 10 Day France Itineraries 2024 (with Reviews)
  • Best 7 Day France Itineraries 2024 (with Reviews)
  • 10 Best River Cruise Companies (with Reviews)

International Versions

  • Deutsch: Flusskreuzfahrt ab Nizza
  • Français: Voyages Croisière fluviale au départ de Nice
  • Español: Crucero fluvial Viajes desde Bonito
  • Nederlands: Riviercruise die beginnen in Nice

IMAGES

  1. 2022 Seine River Cruise Itineraries

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  2. 2019 France River Cruises In 5-Star All-Inclusive Luxury With Scenic

    river cruises thru france

  3. Cruising the Seine River in Paris: How to Choose the Best Seine Cruise

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  4. 9 Best River Cruises In France To Enjoy Its Beauty And Culture

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  5. Paris: River Cruise on the Seine

    river cruises thru france

  6. Everything About Seine River Cruise

    river cruises thru france

COMMENTS

  1. All Inclusive French River Cruises 2023/2024

    $4,990 ? View Tour Compare Tauck Bridges Family Travel Bon Voyage! France Family River Cruise 8 days | 2024-2025 Paris, Tournon, Provence, Arles, Avignon, Lyon Experience the best of France - together as a family.... two nights in Paris and a 5-night river cruise along the historic Rhône river immerse your family in just about everything Français!

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    France River Cruises See France from a unique perspective with one of our first-rate river cruise tours brought to you by internationally acclaimed cruise companies. Experience the romance, the adventure, the exquisite natural sights, as well as architecture that has formed the fabric of fairy tales and legends!

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    France River Cruises Be it the Rhône, Seine, Dordogne or Gironde, France's rivers reveal some of the world's most celebrated locales: majestic Bordeaux, gastronomic Lyon, historic Normandy, picturesque Provence and elegant Paris. Let Viking immerse you in rich culture and tradition. Departure Date Duration Clear All Filters Rhine Getaway

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    France River Cruises: Avalon cruises to France are truly memorable. Explore Côte d'Azur, Paris & more European cities. View trips & cruise France today!

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    Nine highly experienced river cruise companies offer an extensive choice of river cruises on France's five major rivers, the Seine, Rhine, Saône/Rhône, Bordeaux/Garonne and the Loire. Popular French River Cruises Showing 3 of 3,000+ cruises From £4,699pp UNIWORLD Boutique River Cruises Burgundy & Provence ABOARD S.S. Catherine From £1,409pp A-ROSA

  6. Choosing the Best French River Cruise

    Travel in style on the most sophisticated of French river cruises, bookended by 2-night stays in the glamorous cities of Paris and Cannes. This French escapade takes you to cosmopolitan destinations along the Rhône and Saône Rivers and includes a tour of the breathtaking Burgundy wine-growing region.

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  8. 40 Best Cruises to France for 2024-2025 River Cruises + Mediterranean

    10 Best River Cruises in France for 2024-2025 All French Cruises Taste of Bordeaux 15 Days from $6,179 Taste of Bordeaux - Cruise Only Bordeaux to Bordeaux 8 Days from $3,599 Colors of Provence - Cruise Only Lyon to Avignon 8 Days from $3,699

  9. France

    France is the quintessential destination for good reason. Whether you visit romantic Northern France, stunning Bordeaux, or charming Burgundy & Provence, you'll find yourself enchanted by the best wines and cuisines the world has to offer. Come for the famous Chateau wineries of Bordeaux and cultural landmarks of Paris, then leave reminiscing about your stroll through Monet's Giverny gardens ...

  10. 2023 France River Cruises

    A family-owned company since 2002, award-winning AmaWaterways offers unforgettable river cruises with 28 ships sailing through Europe, Asia, Africa and South America. 'Ama' means love - and we put love in everything we do, from our exquisite locally-sourced cuisine to our variety of included shore excursions in every port to our warm, personalized service. We are also proud of our innovations ...

  11. 10 Things To Know Before Taking a River Cruise In France

    Considering taking a river cruise in France? Lucky you! In my opinion, taking a river cruise is one of the best ways to see the country as you'll get a front-row seat to historic cities and gorgeous nature. I recently went on a Rhone River cruise with Avalon Waterways, traveling south from the city of Lyon to Port-Saint-Louis.

  12. The 8 Best European River Cruises 2024

    Best European River Cruise Overall: Viking Cruises, Viking Egdir. Best High-End European River Cruise: Uniworld, S.S. La Venezia. Best European River Cruise For Families: A-Rosa, A-Rosa Sena. Best ...

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    Relax with a France river cruise, sailing along the romantically charming towns and cities along the Rhône and Saône riverbanks. 1-855-222-3214 Call Emerald Cruises 1-855-222-3214. Book a Cruise Manage booking Agent Portal Brochures Newsletter Sign-Up ...

  14. 10 Best River Cruises in France And Germany 2024

    Find a River Cruise that explores France And Germany. There are 538 cruises to choose from, that range in length from 3 days up to 26 days. ... Dates & length Places Filters. 250+ river cruises through France And Germany with 602 reviews Save and compare this adventure. View Map . Romantic Rhine (Southbound) 2024 Romantic Rhine (Southbound ...

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    36 river cruises through France And Spain with reviews View Map Discover the Rivers of France & Portugal & Nice Destinations Portugal, Spain +1 more Age Range up to 90 year olds River Douro, Rhone, Saone Operated in English Operator Emerald Cruises Duration 18 days Price per day $535 From US$9,625 View tour Download Brochure View Map

  16. France River Cruises, Holiday Deals

    Rivers flowing through France The Seine . Though the river begins its journey in the east of the country close to Dijon, river cruises along the Seine tend to be round-trips from the country's capital, presenting river cruisers with plenty of opportunities to explore Paris' many sights .

  17. France River Cruises 2023 & 2024

    River Cruises Ocean Cruises France River Cruises. Explore the historic beauty of Normandy, the sun-dappled Seine River, Bordeaux wine region, and the South of France. View itineraries

  18. France River Cruises 2024 & 2025

    France River Cruises. Explore the captivating cities of Paris, Nice, Lyon, the Bordeaux wine region and enjoy the South Of France cuisine. View itineraries. 01617 688 129 Call Scenic on 01617 688 129. Find a Cruise / Tour Agent Portal Manage Booking ...

  19. France's Finest

    1-800-304-9616. *Free airfare on select departures of Grand European Tour, Capitals of Eastern Europe, and European Sojourn, plus select Panama Canal, Hawaii, Mississippi River, Great Lakes and Antarctica itineraries. Explore Avignon's Palace of the Popes and savor Lyon's culinary heritage. Toast centuries-old vineyards and luxuriate in ...

  20. Bordeaux River Cruise, Garonne Cruises 2023/24

    Please tell Laurie that you're making contact through French Waterways. Our expert partners at Panache Cruises will find you the perfect river cruise in France. CONTACT US 0044 161 513 8208. Our expert partner Laurie Reitman will find you the perfect river cruise in France. 469-269-3763. A selection of Garonne & Bordeaux river cruises.

  21. Eight of the best Danube cruises to book for 2024

    Sara Macefield 27 January 2024 • 12:00pm. AmaWaterways takes to the Danube Credit: AmaWaterways. Following the twists and turns of the Danube River through some of Europe 's most noble nations ...

  22. Top 10 Luxury River Cruises in France

    250+ Luxury river cruises on the France with 95 reviews View Map Beautiful Bordeaux Destinations Bordeaux +9 more Age Range up to 99 year olds Ship Scenic Diamond Regions Garonne, Dordogne +4 more Operated in English Operator Scenic Luxury Cruises & Tours Duration 11 days Price per day $1,154 From US$12,690 View tour Download Brochure View Map

  23. A Viking Rhine River Cruise in Winter

    In the depths of winter, it doesn't get light until around 8am and with some tours starting at 8.30am, be prepared for early morning starts which resemble the depths of the night. Though, once ...

  24. The Best New River Cruise Ships and Sailings of 2024

    The Avalon Alegria will offer priceless Douro River Valley views from staterooms with beds facing floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors. Courtesy of Avalon Waterways. For the first time, river cruise line Avalon Waterways will begin sailing in Portugal's Douro River Valley in April 2024, launching a new ship there along with two itineraries.

  25. The Enchanting World of Scenic River Cruising: Is it Right for You?

    Whether it's the majestic Danube navigating through Europe's historic cities or the mystical Mekong revealing the treasures of Southeast Asia, river cruises promise a close connection with the ...

  26. Paris to Normandy 2023 by Avalon Waterways with 12 Tour Reviews

    With the River Cruise tour Paris to Normandy 2023, you have a 8 days tour package taking you through Paris, France and 5 other destinations in France. Paris to Normandy 2023 includes accommodation, an expert guide, meals and more. Expand All. Introduction. Day 1 PARIS, FRANCE (EMBARKATION)

  27. Viking Opens 2026 Ocean Voyages and Announces New ...

    Due to Strong Demand, Viking Opens Bookings for Newest Ocean Ship and Itineraries Through 2026. Los Angeles (January 24, 2023) - Viking® ( www.viking.com) today announced that its 2026 ocean voyages are now open for booking. With many 2024 dates already sold out and 2025 departures selling fast, strong demand among North American travelers ...

  28. 10 Best River Cruises from Nice

    Find 42 river cruises starting in Nice, France with 1 cruise reviews from past travellers. Enquire now with TourRadar! January Sale: The world is waiting at Up to 70% OFF. Ends on 1d 0h 1m 33s. 0. ... River Cruises from Nice. A cruise starting in Nice is a great way to experience river cruising. We have 42 cruises that range from 8 days up to ...