How to Watch Star Trek in Order: The Complete Series Timeline

The full star trek timeline, explained..

How to Watch Star Trek in Order: The Complete Series Timeline - IGN Image

Ever since 1966’s premiere of the first episode of Star Trek: The Original Series, the entertainment world has never been the same. This franchise that has boldly gone where no property has gone before has captured the hearts and minds of millions around the world and has grown into a space-faring empire of sorts filled with multiple shows, feature length films, comics, merchandise, and so much more. That being said, the amount of Star Trek out in the world can make it tough to know exactly how to watch everything it offers in either chronological or release order so you don’t miss a thing. To help make things easier for you, we’ve created this guide to break down everything you need to know about engaging with this Star Trek journey.

It used to be a bit trickier to track down all the Star Trek shows and movies you’d need to watch to catch up, but Paramount+ has made it a whole lot easier as it has become the home of nearly all the past, present and future Star Trek entries.

So, without further ado, come with us into the final frontier and learn how you can become all caught up with the adventures of Kirk, Picard, Janeway, Sisko, Spock, Pike, Archer, Burnham, and all the others that have made Star Trek so special over the past 56 years.

And, in case you're worried, everything below is a mostly spoiler-free chronological timeline that will not ruin any of any major plot points of anything further on in the timeline. So, you can use this guide as a handy way to catch up without ruining much of the surprise of what’s to come on your adventure! If you’d prefer to watch everything Star Trek as it was released, you’ll find that list below as well!

How to Watch Star Trek in Chronological Order

  • How to Watch Star Trek by Release Order

1. Star Trek: Enterprise (2151-2155)

Star Trek: Enterprise is the earliest entry on our list as it takes place a hundred years before the adventures of Kirk, Spock, and the rest of the crew of Star Trek: The Original Series. The show aired from 2001 to 2005 and starred Scott Bakula as Jonathan Archer, the captain of the Enterprise NX-01. This version of the Enterprise was actually Earth’s first starship that was able to reach warp five.

While the show had its ups and downs, it included a fascinating look at a crew without some of the advanced tech we see in other Star Trek shows, the first contact with various alien species we know and love from the Star Trek universe, and more.

2. Star Trek: Discovery: Seasons 1 and 2 (2256-2258)

star trek next generation timeline

This is where things get a little bit tricky, as the first two seasons of Star Trek: Discovery take place before Star Trek: The Original Series but Seasons 3 and 4 take us boldly to a place we’ve not gone before. We won’t spoil why that’s the case here, but it’s important to note if you want to watch Star Trek in order, you’ll have to do a bit of jumping around from series to movie to series.

As for what Star Trek: Discovery is, it's set the decade before the original and stars Sonequa Martin-Green’s Michael Burnham, a Starfleet Commander who accidentally helps start a war between the United Federation of Planets and the Klingon Empire. She gets court-martialed and stripped of her rank following these events and is reassigned to the U.S.S Discovery.

3. Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (2259-TBD)

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds also begins before the events of Star Trek: The Original Series and is set up by Star Trek: Discovery as its captain, Anson Mount’s Christopher Pike, makes an appearance in its second season. If that name sounds familiar, it’s because Pike first appeared in the original failed pilot episode “The Cage” of Star Trek: The Original Series and would later become James T. Kirk’s predecessor after the original actor, Jefferey Hunter, backed out of the show.

Fast forward all these years later and now we get to learn more about the story of Christopher Pike and many other familiar faces from The Original Series alongside new characters. It’s made even more special as the ship the crew uses is the U.S.S. Enterprise NCC-1701, the very same that would soon call Kirk its captain.

4. Star Trek: The Original Series (2265-2269)

star trek next generation timeline

The fourth Star Trek series or movie you should watch in the order is the one that started it all - Star Trek: The Original Series . Created by Gene Roddenberry, this first Star Trek entry would kick off a chain reaction that would end up creating one of the most beloved IPs of all time. However, it almost never made it to that legendary status as its low ratings led to a cancellation order after just three seasons that aired from 1966 to 1969. Luckily, it found great popularity after that and built the foundation for all the Star Trek stories we have today.

Star Trek: The Original Series starred William Shatner as James T. Kirk and Leonard Nimoy as Spock, but the rest of the crew would go on to become nearly as iconic as they were. As for what the show was about? Well, we think Kirk said it best during each episode’s opening credits;

“Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise . Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.”

5. Star Trek: The Animated Series (2269-2270)

While Star Trek: The Original Series may have been canceled after just three seasons, its popularity only grew, especially with the help of syndication. Following this welcome development, Gene Roddenberry decided he wanted to continue the adventures of the crew of the Enterprise NCC-1701 in animated form, and he brought back many of the original characters and the actors behind them for another go.

Star Trek: The Animated Series lasted for two seasons from 1973 to 1974 and told even more stories of the Enterprise and its adventures throughout the Milky Way galaxy.

6. Star Trek: The Motion Picture (2270s)

star trek next generation timeline

The first Star Trek film was a very big deal as it brought back the crew of Star Trek: The Original Series after the show was canceled in 1969 after just three seasons. However, even it had a rough road to theaters as Roddenberry initially failed to convince Paramount Pictures it was worth it in 1975. Luckily, the success of Close Encounters of the Third Kind and other factors helped finally convince those in power to make the movie and abandon the plans for a new television series called Star Trek: Phase II, which also would have continued the original story.

In Star Trek: The Motion Picture, James T. Kirk was now an Admiral in Starfleet, and certain events involving a mysterious alien cloud of energy called V’Ger cause him to retake control of a refitted version of the U.S.S. Enterprise with many familiar faces in tow.

7. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (2285)

Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry had a sequel to Star Trek: The Motion Picture written, but Paramount turned it down after the reception to that first film was not what the studio had hoped for. In turn, Paramount removed him from the production and brought in Harve Bennett and Jack B. Sowards to write the script and Nicholas Meyer to direct the film.

The studio’s decision proved to be a successful one as Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan is considered by many, including IGN, to be the best Star Trek film. As for the story, it followed the battle between Admiral James T. Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise vs. Ricardo Montalban’ Khan Noonien Singh. Khan is a genetically engineered superhuman and he and his people were exiled by Kirk on a remote planet in the episode ‘Space Seed’ from the original series. In this second film, after being stranded for 15 years, Khan wants revenge.

8. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (2285)

star trek next generation timeline

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock continues the story that began in Wrath of Khan and deals with the aftermath of Spock’s death. While many on the U.S.S. Enterprise thought that was the end for their science officer, Kirk learns that Spock’s spirit/katra is actually living inside the mind of DeForest Kelley’s Dr. McCoy, who has been acting strange ever since the death of his friend. What follows is an adventure that includes a stolen U.S.S. Enterprise, a visit from Spock’s father Sarek, a run-in with Klingons, and so much more.

9. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (2286 and 1986)

While it is undoubtedly great that Kirk and his crew saved Spock, it apparently wasn’t great enough to avoid the consequences that follow stealing and then losing the Enterprise. On their way to answer for their charges, the former crew of the Enterprise discover a threat to Earth that, without spoiling anything, causes them to go back in time to save everything they love. The Voyage Home is a big departure from the previous films as, instead of space, we spend most of our time in 1986’s San Francisco.

10. Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (2287)

star trek next generation timeline

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier once again brings back our favorite heroes from Star Trek: The Original Series, but it’s often regarded as one of the weakest films starring Kirk, Spock, McCoy, etc. In this adventure, our crew’s shore leave gets interrupted as they are tasked with going up against the Vulcan Sybok, who himself is on the hunt for God in the middle of the galaxy.

11. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (2293)

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country is the final movie starring the entire cast of Star Trek: The Original Series, and it puts the Klingons front and center. After a mining catastrophe destroys the Klingon moon of Praxis and threatens the Klingon’s homeworld, Klingon Chancellor Gorkon is forced to abandon his species' love of war in an effort to seek peace with the Federation. What follows is an adventure that calls back to the fall of the Soviet Union and the Berlin Wall and serves as a wonderful send-off to characters we’ve come to know and love since 1966, even though some will thankfully appear in future installments.

12. Star Trek: The Next Generation (2364-2370)

star trek next generation timeline

After you make it through all six of the Star Trek: The Original Series movies, it’s time to start what many consider the best Star Trek series of all time - Star Trek: The Next Generation . The series, which starred Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard, ran from 1987 through 1994 with 178 episodes over seven seasons.

There are so many iconic characters and moments in The Next Generation, including William Riker, Data, Worf, Geordi La Forge, Deanna Troi, and Dr. Beverly Crusher, and many of these beloved faces would return for Star Trek: Picard, which served as a continuation of this story.

While we are once again on the U.S.S. Enterprise in Star Trek: The Next Generation, this story takes place a century after the events of Star Trek: The Original Series. However, there may just be a few familiar faces that pop up from time to time.

13. Star Trek Generations (2293)

While Star Trek Generations is the first film featuring the Star Trek: The Next Generation crew, it also features a team-up that many had dreamed of for years and years between Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Captain James T. Kirk.

Our heroes are facing off against an El-Aurian named Dr. Tolian Soran, who will do whatever is necessary to return to an extra-dimensional realm known as the Nexus. Without spoiling anything, these events lead to a meeting with these two legendary captains and a heartfelt-at-times send-off to The Original Series, even though not every character returned that we wished could have.

14. Star Trek: First Contact (2373)

star trek next generation timeline

Star Trek: First Contact was not only the second film featuring the crew from Star Trek: The Next Generation, but it also served as the motion picture directorial debut for William Riker actor Jonathan Frakes. In this film, the terrifying Borg take center stage and force our heroes to travel back in time to stop them from conquering Earth and assimilating the entire human race.

This movie picks up on the continuing trauma caused by Jean-Luc Picard getting assimilated in the series and becoming Locutus of Borg, and we are also treated to the first warp flight in Star Trek’s history, a shout-out to Deep Space Nine, and more.

15. Star Trek: Insurrection (2375)

Star Trek: Insurrection, which unfortunately ranked last on our list of the best Star Trek movies, is the third film starring the Star Trek: The Next Generation crew and followed a story involving an alien race that lives on a planet with more-or-less makes them invincible due to its rejuvenating properties. This alien race, known as the Ba’Ku, are being threatened by not only another alien race called the Son’a, but also the Federation. Captain Jean-Luc Picard and his crew disobey Federation orders in hopes to save the peaceful Ba’Ku, and while it sounds like an interesting premise, many said it felt too much like an extended episode of the series instead of a big blockbuster film.

16. Star Trek: Nemesis (2379)

star trek next generation timeline

The final Star Trek: The Next Generation movie is Star Trek: Nemesis , and it also isn’t looked at as one of the best. There are bright parts in the film, including Tom Hardy’s Shinzon who is first thought to be a Romulan praetor before it’s revealed he is a clone of Captain Jean-Luc Picard, but it also features a lot of retreaded ground. There are some great moments between our favorite TNG characters, but it’s not quite the goodbye many had hoped for. Luckily, this won’t be the last we’ll see of them.

17. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (2369-2375)

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine is the fourth Star Trek series and it ran from 1993 to 1999 with 176 episodes over seven seasons. Deep Space Nine was also the first Star Trek series to be created without the direct involvement of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, but instead with Rick Berman and Michael Piller. Furthermore, it was the first series to begin when another Star Trek Series - The Next Generation - was still on the air.

The connections between The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine don’t end there, as there were a ton of callbacks to TNG in Deep Space Nine, and characters like Worf and Miles O’Brien played a big part in the series. Other TNG characters popped up from time to time, including Captain Jean-Luc Picard, and certain Deep Space Nine characters also showed their faces in TNG.

Deep Space Nine was a big departure from the Star Trek series that came before, as it not only took place mostly on a space station - the titular Deep Space Nine - but it was the first to star an African American as its central character in Avery Brooks’ Captain Benjamin Sisko.

Deep Space Nine was located in a very interesting part of the Milky Way Galaxy as it was right next to a wormhole, and the series was also filled with conflict between the Cardassians and Bajorans, the war between the Federation and the Dominion, and much more.

18. Star Trek: Voyager (2371-2378)

star trek next generation timeline

Star Trek: Voyager is the fifth Star Trek series and it ran from 1995 to 2001 with 172 episodes over seven seasons. Star Trek: Voyager begins its journey at Deep Space Nine, and then it follows the tale of Kate Mulgrew’s Captain Kathryn Janeway (the first female leading character in Star Trek history!) and her crew getting lost and stranded in the faraway Delta Quadrant.

The episodes and adventures that follow all see the team fighting for one goal: getting home. Being so far away from the Alpha Quadrant we were so used to letting Star Trek be very creative in its storytelling and give us situations and alien races we’d never encountered before.

That doesn’t mean it was all unfamiliar, however, as the Borg became a huge threat in the later seasons. It’s a good thing too, as that led to the introduction of Jeri Ryan’s Seven of Nine, a character who would continue on to appear in Star Trek: Picard and become a fan favorite.

19. Star Trek: Lower Decks (2380-TBD)

Star Trek: Lower Decks debuted in 2020 and was the first animated series to make it to air since 1973’s Star Trek: The Animated Series. Alongside having that feather in its cap, it also sets itself apart by choosing to focus more on the lower lever crew instead of the captain and senior staff.

This leads to many fun adventures that may not be as high stakes as the other stories, but are no less entertaining. There have already been three seasons of Star Trek: Lower Decks, and the fourth season is set to arrive later this summer.

The series is also worth a watch as it is having a crossover with Star Trek: Strange New Worlds that will mix the worlds of live-action and animation.

20. Star Trek: Prodigy (2383-TBD)

Star Trek: Prodigy was the first fully 3D animated Star Trek series ever and told a story that began five years after the U.S.S. Voyager found its way back home to Earth. In this series, which was aimed for kids, a group of young aliens find an abandoned Starfleet ship called the U.S.S. Protostar and attempt to make it to Starfleet and the Alpha Quadrant from the Delta Quadrant.

Voyager fans will be delighted to know that Kate Mulgrew returns as Kathryn Janeway in this animated series, but not only as herself. She is also an Emergency Training Holographic Advisor that was based on the likeness of the former captain of the U.S.S. Voyager.

The second season of Star Trek: Prodigy was set to arrive later this year, but it was not only canceled in June, but also removed from Paramount+. There is still hope this show may find a second life on another streaming service or network.

21. Star Trek: Picard (2399-2402)

star trek next generation timeline

Star Trek: Picard is the… well… next generation of Star Trek: The Next Generation as it brings back not only Partick Stewart’s Jean-Luc Picard, but also many of his former crew members from the beloved series. The story is set 20 years after the events of Star Trek Nemesis and we find Picard retired from Starfleet and living at his family’s vineyard in France.

Without spoiling anything, certain events get one of our favorite captains back to work and take him on an adventure through space and time over three seasons and 30 episodes.

The show had its ups and downs, but the third season, in our opinion, stuck the landing and gave us an “emotional, exciting, and ultimately fun journey for Jean-Luc and his family - both old and new - that gives the character the send-off that he has long deserved.”

22. Star Trek: Discovery: Seasons 3 and 4 (3188-TBD)

While Star Trek: Discovery begins around 10 years before Star Trek: The Original Series, the show jumps more than 900 years into the future into the 32nd Century following the events of the second season. The Federation is not in great shape and Captain Michael Burnham and her crew work to bring it back to what it once was.

Star Trek: Discovery is set to end after the upcoming fifth season, which will debut on Paramount+ in 2024.

How to Watch Star Trek by Order of Release

  • Star Trek: The Original Series (1966 - 1969)
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series (1973 - 1974)
  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982)
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (1984)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987 - 1994)
  • Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989)
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993 - 1999)
  • Star Trek: Generations (1994)
  • Star Trek: Voyager (1995 - 2001)
  • Star Trek: First Contact (1996)
  • Star Trek: Insurrection (1998)
  • Star Trek: Enterprise (2001 - 2005)
  • Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)
  • Star Trek (2009)
  • Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
  • Star Trek Beyond (2016)
  • Star Trek: Discovery (2017 - Present)
  • Star Trek: Picard (2020 - 2023)
  • Star Trek: Lower Decks (2020 - Present)
  • Star Trek: Prodigy (2021 - TBA)
  • Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (2022 - Present)

For more, check out our look at the hidden meaning behind Star Trek’s great captains, why Star Trek doesn’t get credit as the first shared universe, if this may be the end of Star Trek’s golden age of streaming, and our favorite classic Star Trek episodes and movies.

In This Article

Star Trek

Star Trek: The Next Generation

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Star Trek: The Next Generation , often abbreviated to TNG , is the second live-action Star Trek television series, and the first set in the 24th century . Like its predecessors, it was created by Gene Roddenberry . Produced at Paramount Pictures , it aired in first-run syndication , by Paramount Television in the US, from September 1987 to May 1994 . The series was set in the 24th century and featured the voyages of the starship USS Enterprise -D under Captain Jean-Luc Picard .

The series led to four spin-offs set in the same time period: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine , which it ran alongside during its final two seasons, Star Trek: Voyager , Star Trek: Lower Decks and Star Trek: Picard . It is also the beginning of a contiguous period of time during which there was always at least one Star Trek series in production, ending with Star Trek: Enterprise in 2005 .

  • Main Title Theme  file info (arranged by Dennis McCarthy , composed by Jerry Goldsmith and Alexander Courage )
  • 2.1 Starring
  • 2.2 Also starring
  • 3.1 Season 1
  • 3.2 Season 2
  • 3.3 Season 3
  • 3.4 Season 4
  • 3.5 Season 5
  • 3.6 Season 6
  • 3.7 Season 7
  • 4.1 Remastering
  • 5.1 Performers
  • 5.2 Stunt performers
  • 5.3 Production staff
  • 5.4 Companies
  • 6 Related topics
  • 8 External links

Summary [ ]

Star Trek: The Next Generation moved the universe forward roughly a century past the days of James T. Kirk and Spock . The series depicted a new age in which the Klingons were allies of the Federation , though the Romulans remained adversaries. New threats included the Ferengi (although they were later used more for comic relief), the Cardassians , and the Borg . While Star Trek: The Original Series was clearly made in the 1960s, the first two seasons of The Next Generation show all the markings of a 1980s product, complete with Spandex uniforms .

As with the original Star Trek , TNG was still very much about exploration, "boldly going where no one has gone before". Similarly, the plots captured the adventures of the crew of a starship, namely the USS Enterprise -D . Despite the apparent similarities with the original series, the creators of TNG were adamant about creating a bold, independent vision of the future. The public did not widely accept the show on its own terms until the airing of " The Best of Both Worlds ", which marked a shift towards higher drama, serious plot lines, and a less episodic nature. This helped pave the way for Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and its two-year-long Dominion War arc and preceding build-up, as well as the third and fourth seasons of Star Trek: Enterprise . Star Trek: Voyager capitalized on the heightened crew relationships and familial bonds first seen on The Next Generation. DS9, on the other hand, balanced political intrigue, character development, and series-long plot threads with a rerun-friendly format.

As with the original Star Trek , TNG's special effects utilized miniatures, but due to great advancements in computerized effects and opticals, the show leaped ahead of its predecessor in terms of quality effects. This series marked the greatest surge in Star Trek 's mainstream popularity, and paved the way for the later televised Trek shows.

Four of the Star Trek motion pictures continued the adventures of the TNG cast after the end of the series in 1994. Star Trek Generations served to "pass the torch" from The Original Series cast, who had been the subject of the first six motion pictures, by including crossover appearances from William Shatner , James Doohan , and Walter Koenig ; it also featured the destruction of the USS Enterprise -D. Star Trek: First Contact , released two years later , was the first of the motion pictures to solely feature the TNG cast, transferred aboard the new USS Enterprise -E and engaging with one of their deadliest enemies from the television series, the Borg. Star Trek: Insurrection followed in 1998 , continuing certain character arcs from the series. In 2002 , Star Trek Nemesis brought some of these character arcs and plot threads to a seemingly definite conclusion, although some cast members expressed hope that future movies would yet pick up the story. Regardless, a new generation of actors appeared in 2009 's Star Trek , which created an alternate reality and returned the films' focus to Kirk and Spock .

On television, characters from TNG appeared in subsequent series. Recurring TNG character Miles O'Brien became a series regular on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine , as did Worf in DS9's fourth season . Jean-Luc Picard appeared in Deep Space Nine 's pilot episode , and supporting characters from TNG appeared occasionally on DS9 (specifically, Keiko O'Brien , Lursa , B'Etor , Molly O'Brien , Vash , Q , Lwaxana Troi , Alynna Nechayev , Gowron , Thomas Riker , Toral , and Alexander Rozhenko ). Reginald Barclay and Deanna Troi appeared several times each on Star Trek: Voyager , and Troi and William T. Riker appeared in the series finale of Star Trek: Enterprise , which was primarily a holographic simulation set during the TNG episode " The Pegasus ". However, Star Trek Nemesis was the final chronological appearance of the Next Generation characters for over 18 years, until Star Trek: Picard , which focused on the later life of Jean-Luc Picard. Riker, Troi, Data , and Hugh also appeared in Picard .

In 1994 , Star Trek: The Next Generation was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series. During its seven-year run, it was nominated for 58 Emmy Awards, mostly in "technical" categories such as visual effects and makeup; it won 18.

Main cast [ ]

Starring [ ].

  • Patrick Stewart as Captain Jean-Luc Picard
  • Jonathan Frakes as Commander William T. Riker

Also starring [ ]

  • LeVar Burton as Lt. j.g. / Lt. / Lt. Cmdr. Geordi La Forge
  • Denise Crosby as Lt. Tasha Yar ( 1987 - 1988 )
  • Michael Dorn as Lt. j.g. / Lt. Worf
  • Gates McFadden as Doctor Beverly Crusher ( 1987 - 1988 ; 1989 - 1994 )
  • Marina Sirtis as Counselor Deanna Troi
  • Brent Spiner as Lt. Commander Data
  • Wil Wheaton as Ensign Wesley Crusher ( 1987 - 1990 )

Episode list [ ]

Season 1 [ ].

TNG Season 1 , 25 episodes:

Season 2 [ ]

TNG Season 2 , 22 episodes:

Season 3 [ ]

TNG Season 3 , 26 episodes:

Season 4 [ ]

TNG Season 4 , 26 episodes:

Season 5 [ ]

TNG Season 5 , 26 episodes:

Season 6 [ ]

TNG Season 6 , 26 episodes:

Season 7 [ ]

TNG Season 7 , 25 episodes:

Behind the scenes [ ]

Star Trek: The Next Generation was originally pitched to the then-fledgling Fox Network . However, they couldn't guarantee an initial order greater than thirteen episodes, not enough to make the enormous start-up costs of the series worth the expense. It was then decided to sell the series to the first-run syndication market. The show's syndicated launch was overseen by Paramount Television president Mel Harris , a pioneer in the syndicated television market. Many of the stations that carried The Next Generation had also run The Original Series for a long time.

According to issues of Star Trek: The Official Fan Club Magazine from early 1987, TNG was originally planned to be set in the 25th century, 150 years after the original series, and the Enterprise would have been the Enterprise NCC-1701-G. Gene Roddenberry ultimately changed the timeline to mid-24th century, set on board the Enterprise NCC-1701-D, as an Enterprise -G would have been the eighth starship to bear the name and that was too many for the relatively short time period that was to have passed.

Star Trek: The Next Generation was billed initially as being set 78 years after the days of the original USS Enterprise . [1] (p. 16) However, after the series' first season was established as being set in the year 2364 , this reference became obsolete as dates were then able to be set for the original series and the four previous films. When this happened, it was established that the events of the original series were about a hundred years before the events of TNG. With TNG's first season being set in 2364, 78 years prior would have been 2286 . Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home partly takes place during this year along with the shakedown cruise of the USS Enterprise -A .

On the special The Star Trek Saga: From One Generation To The Next , Gene Roddenberry commented, " On the original Star Trek , I practically lost my family from working so many twelve-hour days, fourteen-hour days, seven days a week, and I told them, 'You can't pay me enough to do that.' But then they said, 'Hey, but suppose we do it in a way in which' they call syndication, 'in which we don't have a network and we don't have all those people up there?' And Paramount was saying to me, 'And we guarantee that you will be in charge of the show.' "

Andrew Probert was first hired by Roddenberry in 1978 . However, not until 1986 , when Roddenberry was preparing to launch a new show, entitled Star Trek: The Next Generation , did he call upon Probert to take a lead design role. Everything had to be rethought, imagined, planned and redesigned. As the vision evolved in the designers' minds, the evolution was charted in successive sketches and paintings.

Among Probert's creations, in addition to the new Enterprise starship and many of its interiors including the main bridge , are many other featured spacecraft. The Ferengi cruiser , and even the Ferengi species, are Probert designs.

Roddenberry originally insisted on doing a one-hour pilot and assigned D.C. Fontana to write the episode, first titled Meeting at Farpoint . However, the studio was keen on having a two-hour pilot, mainly because they wanted something big and spectacular to launch the series, especially considering first-run syndication. Roddenberry himself volunteered to extend Fontana's script to two hours, eventually adding the Q storyline to it.

Ronald D. Moore commented, " Gene did not want conflict between the regular characters on TNG. This began to hamstring the series and led to many, many problems. To put it bluntly, this wasn't a very good idea. But rather than jettison it completely, we tried to remain true to the spirit of a better future where the conflicts between our characters did not show them to be petty or selfish or simply an extension of 20th century mores. " ( AOL chat , 1997 ) Rick Berman explained, " The problem with Star Trek: The Next Generation is Gene created a group of characters that he purposely chose not to allow conflict between. Starfleet officers cannot be in conflict, thus its murderous to write these shows because there is no good drama without conflict, and the conflict has to come from outside the group. " ( Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages , p. 8)

Roddenberry tried to recruit many production staff members from The Original Series to work on the new series. These included producers Robert H. Justman and Edward K. Milkis , writers D.C. Fontana and David Gerrold (who served as the main creative force behind the formation of the series), costume designer William Ware Theiss , assistant director Charles Washburn , composer Fred Steiner , set decorator John M. Dwyer , and writer John D.F. Black . Roddenberry also tried to bring back cinematographer Jerry Finnerman , but he declined the offer, being busy working on Moonlighting at the time. However, all of the above people finished working on the series after or during the first season.

Unit Production Manager David Livingston was responsible for hiring Michael Westmore for the pilot episode. ( ENT Season 3 Blu-ray , " Impulse " audio commentary )

Remastering [ ]

After several months of speculation and partial confirmation, StarTrek.com announced on 28 September 2011 (the 24th anniversary of the series premiere) that The Next Generation would be remastered in 1080p high-definition for release on Blu-ray Disc and eventual syndication, starting in 2012 . The seventh and final season was released on Blu-ray in December 2014 .

Cast and crew [ ]

The following people worked on The Next Generation ; it is unknown during which season or on which episodes.

Performers [ ]

  • Antonio – background actor
  • Charles Bazaldua – voice actor
  • Terrence Beasor – voice actor (17 episodes, including the voice of the Borg )
  • Libby Bideau – featured actress
  • Brian Ciari – background actor: Cardassian ( TNG Season 6 or 7 )
  • Amber Connally – background actress: child
  • Phil Crowley – voice actor
  • Vincent DeMaio – background actor: Enterprise -D operations division officer
  • David Dewitt – background actor
  • Gregory Fletcher – background actor Borg
  • Dan Horton – background actor
  • Carlyle King – voice actress
  • Mark Laing – featured actor
  • Daryl F. Mallett – background actor
  • Tina Morlock – background actress
  • Jean Marie Novak – background actress: Enterprise -D operations division officer
  • Rick H. Olavarria – background actor (1988)
  • Jennifer Ott – background actress: Enterprise -D command division officer
  • Richard Penn – voice actor
  • Judie Pimitera – background actress: Ten Forward waitress
  • Paige Pollack – voice actress
  • Jeff Rector – background actor: Enterprise -D command division officer
  • Gary Schwartz – voice actor/ADR voice
  • Beth Scott – background actress
  • Steve Sekely – background actor
  • Andrea Silver – background actress: Enterprise -D sciences division officer
  • Oliver Theess – recurring background actor (around 1990)
  • Richard Walker – background actor
  • Harry Williams, Jr. – background actor
  • Bruce Winant – supporting actor
  • Stephen Woodworth – background actor

Stunt performers [ ]

  • Laura Albert – stunts
  • John Lendale Bennett – stunts
  • Richard L. Blackwell – stunts
  • John Cade – stunts
  • Chuck Courtney – Assistant Stunt Coordinator
  • Terry James – stunts
  • Gary Jensen – Assistant Stunt Coordinator
  • Lane Leavitt – stunts
  • Pat Romano – stunts

Production staff [ ]

  • Joseph Andolino – Additional Composer
  • David Atherton – Makeup Artist
  • Gregory Benford – Scientific Consultant
  • Steven R. Bernstein – Additional Music Composer/Orchestrator
  • Les Bernstien – Motion Control Operator
  • R. Christopher Biggs – Special Makeup Effects Artist
  • Howard Block – Second Unit Director of Photography
  • Stephen Buchsbaum – Colorist: Unitel Video (Four Seasons)
  • Alan Chudnow – Assistant Editor
  • Marty Church – Foley Mixer
  • Scott Cochran – Scoring Mixer: Advertising Music
  • Robert Cole – Special Effects Artist
  • Sharon Davis – Graphics Assistant
  • David Dittmar – Prosthetic Makeup Artist
  • Dragon Dronet – Prop Maker: Weapons, Specialty Props and Miniatures
  • Jim Dultz – Assistant Art Director
  • Shannon Dunn – Extras Casting: Cenex Casting
  • Chris W. Fallin – Motion Control Operator
  • Edward J. Franklin – Special Effects Artist
  • Lisa Gizara – Assistant to Gates McFadden
  • John Goodwin – Makeup Artist
  • Simon Holden – Digital Compositor (between 1989 and 1994)
  • Kent Allen Jones – Sculptor: Bob Jean Productions
  • Michael R. Jones – Makeup Artist (early 1990s)
  • Jason Kaufman – Prop and Model Maker: Greg Jein, Inc.
  • Nina Kent – Makeup Artist
  • David Kervinen – Visual Effects Illustrator: Composite Image Systems (4 Seasons)
  • Andy Krieger – Extras Casting: Central Casting
  • Tim Landry – Visual Effects Artist
  • Lisa Logan – Cutter/Fitter
  • Jon Macht – Post Production Vendor
  • Gray Marshall – Motion Control Camera Operator: Image "G"
  • Karl J. Martin – Digital Compositor
  • Belinda Merritt – VFX Accountant: The Post Group
  • John Palmer – Special Effects Coordinator: WonderWorks Inc.
  • Frank Popovich – Mold and Prop Assistant
  • Molly Rennie
  • Chris Schnitzer – Motion Control Technician/Rigger: Image "G"
  • Steven J. Scott – Digital Compositor
  • Bruce Sears – DGA Trainee
  • Casey Simpson – Gaffer
  • Ken Stranahan – Visual Effects Artist
  • Rick Stratton – Makeup Artist
  • Greg Stuhl – Miniatures: Greg Jein, Inc.
  • Tim Tommasino – Assistant Editor
  • Peter Webb – Digital Compositor
  • Gregory A. Weimerskirch – Assistant Art Director
  • Bill Witthans – Dolly Grip

Companies [ ]

  • Bob Jean Productions
  • Movie Movers
  • Newkirk Special Effects
  • WonderWorks Inc.

Related topics [ ]

  • TNG directors
  • TNG performers
  • TNG recurring characters
  • TNG studio models
  • TNG writers
  • Character crossover appearances
  • Undeveloped TNG episodes
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation novels
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation comics, volume 1 (DC)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation comics, volume 2 (DC)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation comics (IDW)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation soundtracks
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation on VHS
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation on Betamax
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation on LaserDisc
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation on DVD
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation on Blu-ray
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation pinball machine

External links [ ]

  • Star Trek: The Next Generation at Wikipedia
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation at Memory Beta , the wiki for licensed Star Trek works
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation at the Internet Movie Database
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation at StarTrek.com
  • 2 USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-G)
  • 3 Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • Entertainment
  • How <i>Picard</i> Fits Into the <i>Star Trek</i> Timeline

How Picard Fits Into the Star Trek Timeline

I t’s been 26 long years since Star Trek: The Next Generation graced the small screen. But beginning Jan. 23, a new series centered around that show’s captain, Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), will “boldly go” to the network’s streaming service, CBS All Access. Star Trek: Picard is about our titular captain’s life many years after his last fateful mission for Starfleet.

But how does Picard fit into the larger Star Trek timeline? The CBS series is set where no Trek has gone before, well past the events of TV’s Star Trek: Voyager and the last film of the Picard era, Star Trek: Nemesis. Many fan favorite characters are expected to return, including Commander William T. Riker (Jonathan Frakes) and Seven-of-Nine (Jeri Ryan).

For Trek nerds out there, this means Picard takes place in the “prime” timeline, which is where each of the television series and the original films live. In 2009, J.J. Abrams rebooted the series with the film Star Trek, creating a new timeline for the already confusing Trek universe. In the film, a bad guy travels back in time and destroys the USS Kelvin, killing Captain Kirk’s father, George Kirk, in the process. All three of J.J. Abrams’ movies take place in this alternate timeline called the “Kelvin Timeline,” after the annihilated ship.

To familiarize yourself with the Trek universe, here are the two timelines:

Prime Timeline

Cast Portrait From 'Star Trek: Enterprise'

Star Trek: Enterprise (2151-2161)

Airdate: 2001-2005

Plot: Set 100 years before the Enterprise ‘s mission in the original Star Trek , this series traces the adventures of the first Warp 4 capable Starfleet ship, also called Enterprise . Scott Bakula starred as the human captain Jonathan Archer, and Jolene Blalock as the Vulcan officer T’Pol.

Yeoh and Martin-Green kick off the new Star Trek with an action-packed episode on Sept. 24

Star Trek Discovery (2255)

Airdate: 2017-

Plot: Sonequa Martin-Green plays officer Michael Burnham, a human who was raised by Spock’s parents, Amanda and Sarek. Burnham has suppressed her human tendencies in order to assimilate into the hyper-logical Vulcan society but tries to reconnect with her emotional side when she serves Captain Philippa Georgiou (Michelle Yeoh) and then Captain Gabriel Lorca (Jason Isaacs).

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock and William Shatner as Captain James T. Kirk in Star Trek.

Star Trek (2265-2269)

Airdate: 1966-1969

Plot: The original Star Trek series created by Gene Roddenberry featured Captain James Kirk (William Shatner), First Officer Spock ( Leonard Nimoy ), Officer Uhura (Nichelle Nichols), Dr. McCoy (DeForest Kelley), Montgomery “Scotty” Scott (James Doohan), Hikaru Sulu (George Takei) and the other Starfleet members on a mission of exploration and self-improvement. One of the most diverse shows on television at the time, Star Trek ran for three seasons and inspired future space sagas like Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica .

CBS's "Star Trek: The Animated Series"

Star Trek: The Animated Series (2269-2270)

Airdate: 1973-1974

Plot: After the original series went off the air, Roddenberry created an animated series that continued the stories of Star Trek and reunited much of the same cast to do voice work for cartoon versions of their characters.

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Original Star Trek movies (2273-2293)

Airdate: 1979-1991

Plot: Roddenberry leveraged the massive success of the syndicated series into a number of feature films starring Shatner and Nimoy. Star Trek: The Motion Picture , Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , Star Trek III: The Search for Spock , Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home , Star Trek V: The Finale Frontier and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country continued established storylines.

Star Trek: The Next Generation

Star Trek: The Next Generation (2364-2370)

Airdate: 1987-1994

Plot: Set 100 years after the events of the original Star Trek , this series followed Captain Jean-Luc Picard and his crew (Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton and Marina Sirtis, among them) on the fifth iteration of the Enterprise , USS Enterprise-D .

star trek next generation timeline

Next Generation Movies (2293-2379)

Airdate: 1994-2002

Plot: In Star Trek: Generations (1994), Captain Picard teams up with the once-presumed-dead Captain Kirk. The story unites the casts from the two Star Trek series at the time, effectively passing the baton from Shatner to Stewart. The Next Generation cast went on to star in three more movies, sans the original cast: Star Trek: First Contact , Star Trek: Insurrection and Star Trek Nemesis .

Star Trek:Deep Space Nine

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (2369-2375)

Airdate: 1993-1999

Plot: Set on a space station rather than a starship, Deep Space Nine focuses on the adventures of the people charged with guarding the opening to a wormhole at the end of the galaxy. Deep Space Nine was helmed by Trek’ s first black captain, Benjamin Sisko (Avery Brooks). It was also the first Trek series created without Roddenberry, who gave the concept his approval before he passed away in 1991.

Cast of Star trek Voyager, first season, from left: Neelix (Ethan Phillips), Chakotay (Robert Beltran), Harry S.L. Kim (Garrett Wang), Kathryn Janeway (Kate Mulgrew), Kes (Jennifer Lien), Thomas Eugene Paris (Robert Duncan McNeill), Tuvok (Tim Russ), "The Doctor" (Robert Picardo), B'Elanna Torres (Roxann Dawson), 1995.

Star Trek: Voyager (2371-2378)

Airdate: 1995-2001

Plot: After the ship Voyager gets stranded in the Delta Quadrant (the far side of the Milky Way galaxy) while searching for a renegade ship, they must make the 75-year journey home. Voyager was fronted by Trek’ s first female captain, Kathryn Janeway (Kate Mulgrew).

Star Trek: Picard (2399-?)

Airdate: 2020 — ? (A second season is already in the works)

Plot: Many years after a daring mission to save a dying planet, Captain Picard — now an Admiral — has left Starfleet (or, more accurately, Starfleet has left him). But when a mysterious young woman with a potential connection to a certain beloved android shows up at his doorstep, it sets in motion events that lead Picard back into space — albeit with a crew that’s more swashbuckler than Starfleet.

Kelvin Timeline

star trek next generation timeline

Star Trek (2233-2258)

Release date: 2009

Plot: A bad guy named Nero (Eric Bana), angry that his planet is destroyed in the future, travels back in time and kills Kirk’s father (in 2233). He then hangs out for a long time to destroy Vulcan (in 2258) in front of old Spock who has also traveled back in time (and is played by Leonard Nimoy) because Spock failed to save the baddie’s home planet. Current-day Kirk (Chris Pine) encounters old Spock who explains all the confusing time-jump mechanics to him. Together, current-day Kirk and Spock (Zachary Quinto) become begrudging friends and save the universe.

Star Trek: Into Darkness

Star Trek: Into Darkness

Airdate: 2013

Plot: The second J.J. Abrams film stars Benedict Cumberbatch as a villain that the marketing team really tried to convince people was not genetically-engineered superhuman Khan. (He was Khan.) Kirk leads a mission to capture Khan after her murders a bunch of Starfleet officers.

Zachary Quinto, left, and Karl Urban appear in a scene from "Star Trek Beyond."

Star Trek Beyond

Airdate: 2016

Plot: Justin Lin took over for the third reboot film and threw in some motorcycles because he has a thing for fast vehicles. In this one, a baddie named Krall (Idris Elba) kidnaps part of Kirk’s crew in hopes that Kirk will exchange a powerful McGuffin for their safety.

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Write to Eliana Dockterman at [email protected]

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Star Trek timeline: Boldly go on a chronological journey through the Trek universe

From the Original Series to Discovery, here’s how the Star Trek timeline fits together

Star Trek: Picard, which fits on the Star Trek timeline

The Star Trek timeline becomes more sprawling every week. There's little chance Gene Roddenberry, when he created the series back in the '60s, could have guessed that there would be a new episode of Star Trek made available every week (sometimes even two!).

With hundreds of hours of television spread across several TV shows and over a dozen movies, knowing where to begin with the Star Trek timeline is something of a challenge. The events of the ongoing series Star Trek: Discovery and Star Trek: Picard don't exactly fit in seamlessly at the end. And if you're wanting to include Voyager or Nemesis on a watch/rewatch, then you're in for some complications.

With that in mind, we’ve assembled all the key events that shaped Federation history into one massive Star Trek timeline. We’ve even included the parallel "Kelvin" continuity of the J.J. Abrams Star Trek movie and its sequels, an alternative sequence of events kickstarted when a rogue Romulan ship from the future destroyed the USS Kelvin – killing James T. Kirk’s dad, George, and forever altering Kirk and Spock’s destinies. 

That said, because the numerous spin-off Trek comics and novels aren’t traditionally considered part of the official Star Trek timeline, we’ve left them out. We’ve also steered clear of the Mirror Universe, so there isn’t quite so much timey-wimey stuff going on that you’d have to be Spock or Data to understand it. But before we engage the warp drive and explore the history of the future, here’s an at-a-glance guide to how the various movies and TV shows fit into the Star Trek timeline:

The Prime Star Trek timeline

  • Star Trek: Enterprise (2001-2005)
  • Star Trek: The Cage (1965)
  • Star Trek Discovery pre-time jump (2017-2019)
  • Star Trek: The Original Series (1966-1969)
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series (1973-1974)
  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)
  • Star Trek 2: The Wrath of Khan (1982)
  • Star Trek 3: The Search for Spock (1984)
  • Star Trek 4: The Voyage Home (1986)
  • Star Trek 5: The Final Frontier (1989)
  • Star Trek 6: The Undiscovered Country (1991)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987-1994)
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993-1999)
  • Star Trek: Generations (1994)
  • Star Trek: Voyager (1995-2001)
  • Star Trek: First Contact (1996)
  • Star Trek: Insurrection (1998)
  • Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)
  • Star Trek: Picard (2020-ongoing)
  • Star Trek: Discovery post-time jump (2020-ongoing)
  • Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (2022-ongoing)

The Kelvin Star Trek timeline

  • Star Trek (2009)
  • Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
  • Star Trek Beyond (2016)

Star Trek timeline

Around 200,000 years ago:  An ancient alien species is wiped out by an uprising of synthetic beings. They leave eight stars in an implausible arrangement, the Conclave of Eight, to serve as a warning to future generations. (Star Trek: Picard) 

1893 - The time-travelling crew of the USS Enterprise-D encounters The Adventures of Tom Sawyer author Mark Twain in San Francisco. (Time’s Arrow, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

1930 - Having been sent back to 20th century New York by the malevolent ring the Guardian of Forever, James T Kirk is forced to allow peace campaigner Edith Keeler to die in order to save millions of lives in World War 2. (The City on the Edge of Forever, Star Trek: The Original Series)

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1947 - Ferengi Quark, Rom, and Nog crash land in 20th century Roswell, New Mexico, and are captured by US authorities who (correctly, to be fair) think they’re aliens. (Little Green Men, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

1986 - Kirk, Spock, and the rest of the original Enterprise crew kidnap a pair of humpback whales to save the future from an alien probe. (Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home)

1996 - Genetically enhanced tyrant Khan Noonien Singh and 84 of his followers escape the Eugenics Wars on Earth (remember those?), going into suspended animation on the SS Botany Bay. (Space Seed, Star Trek: The Original Series)

2024  – Picard and La Sirena crew arrive in the 21st century to fix the event that's created a dystopian alternative timeline. Along the way they meet a younger version of Guinan and an ancient ancestor of Data's creator. (Star Trek: Picard)

2063 - In the wake of World War 3, Zefram Cochrane makes Earth’s first successful warp flight, attracting the attention of some passing Vulcans who subsequently introduce Earth into the interstellar community – all while the crew of the Enterprise-E fight to stop the Borg assimilating the planet. (Star Trek: First Contact)

2151 - Suliban fighting in a Temporal Cold War shoot down Klingon warrior Klaang over Broken Bow, Oklahoma – bringing about humanity’s first contact with a Klingon. The prototype USS Enterprise (NX-01) sets off on a mission to return him to Qo’noS – against the wishes of the Vulcans and their massive superiority complex. (Broken Bow, Star Trek: Enterprise)

2153 - An alien probe fires a massive energy beam at Earth’s surface, causing destruction across the American continent. The Enterprise is redeployed to the Delphic Expanse to fight back against the perpetrators, the Xindi. (The Expanse, Star Trek: Enterprise) A group of Borg who survived the attempted invasion of Earth in 2063 are accidentally thawed by a research team in the Arctic. It doesn’t end well. (Regeneration, Star Trek: Enterprise)

2164 - The USS Franklin, commanded by Captain Balthazar Edison, goes missing – that might just prove important later… (Star Trek Beyond)

2230 - Spock is born on Vulcan.

2233 - James T Kirk is born. 

2233 (Kelvin timeline) - The USS Kelvin is destroyed by time-travelling 24th century Romulan ship Narada, kickstarting the so-called the Kelvin timeline. (Star Trek, 2009)

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2230s (exact date unknown) - After her parents are killed in a Klingon attack, Michael Burnham is adopted by Sarek and Amanda Grayson on Vulcan. Her adoptive brother, Spock, has his first sighting of a “ Red Angel ”. (Will You Take My Hand?, Star Trek: Discovery)

2254 - The USS Enterprise, captained by Christopher Pike, discovers the survivors of crashed survey ship SS Columbia on Talos IV – though it turns out they’re an illusion created by the telepathic Talosians. (Star Trek: The Cage)

2256 - The USS Shenzou’s first officer, Commander Michael Burnham, defies the orders of Captain Philippa Georgiou, and is charged with mutiny. The Federation/Klingon War begins at the Battle of the Binary Stars. (The Vulcan Hello/The Battle at the Binary Stars, Star Trek: Discovery)

2257 - The Federation/Klingon War ends, with the hydro bomb Section 31 plant at the heart of Qo’noS helping maintain peace between feuding Klingon houses. (Will You Take My Hand, Star Trek: Discovery) With the Enterprise under repair, Christopher Pike assumes command of the Discovery on a mission to understand the so-called “Red Angels” – and track down his AWOL science officer, Spock. (Brother, Star Trek: Discovery)

2258 –  In order to save all life in the universe from a rogue Federation AI known as Control, Michael Burnham uses the Red Angel time travel suit (created by her parents) to carry data collected by a millennia-old alien probe into the future. The USS Discovery and its crew follow her on a one-way trip through the wormhole. (Star Trek: Discovery)

2258 (Kelvin timeline) - The Narada reappears and destroys Vulcan, as an act of revenge on Spock. The Enterprise (commanded by Christopher Pike) engages the Romulan ship, but with Pike incapacitated, James T Kirk eventually assumes command of the ship – and defeats the Narada. In the wake of Vulcan’s destruction, Admiral Alexander Marcus tries to increase Starfleet’s military capabilities – and subsequently discovers the SS Botany Bay years earlier than in the Prime timeline. Khan Noonien Singh is revived and recruited by shadowy spy branch Section 31. (Star Trek Into Darkness)

2259 (Kelvin timeline) - Going under the name John Harrison, Khan wages a one-man war on the Federation – all in the name of recovering his crew from suspended animation. The Enterprise crew eventually defeat him and put him back into stasis, but Kirk dies in the process. Luckily Dr McCoy is able to use some of Khan’s blood to revive his captain – phew! (Star Trek Into Darkness)

2260 (Kelvin timeline) - The USS Enterprise begins its (other) famous five-year mission. (Star Trek Into Darkness)

2263 (Kelvin timeline) - Three years into the five-year mission (with things starting to get boring), the Enterprise is destroyed by Krall’s swarm ships, marooning the crew on an alien planet. It turns out Krall was the captain of the aforementioned USS Franklin, who’s spent the last century using alien tech to keep himself alive – and developing a colossal grudge against the Federation. He’s eventually killed on new Federation starbase, the USS Yorktown. James T Kirk and crew are assigned to a new ship, the Enterprise-A. The original Spock Prime – the one who travelled back in time – passes away on New Vulcan (Star Trek Beyond).

2266 - The USS Enterprise’s five-year mission to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilisations, to boldly go where no one has gone before, begins under the command of Captain James T Kirk. (Star Trek: The Original Series)

2267 - After Spock mutinies, a gravely injured Christopher Pike is taken to the off-limits Talos 4, and lives out a “normal” life thanks to the illusions of the telepathic Talosians. (The Menagerie, Star Trek: The Original Series) The Enterprise discovers SS Botany Bay, and awakens Khan Noonien Singh from suspended animation. After he tries to take over the ship, Khan and his crew are exiled to Ceti Alpha 5. (Space Seed, Star Trek: The Original Series)

Early 2270s (exact year unknown) - The refitted USS Enterprise (commanded once again by Admiral James T Kirk) encounters V’Ger, a 20th century space probe (Voyager 6 under an alias) that has gained sentience and threatens to destroy planet Earth. (Star Trek: The Motion Picture)

2285 - While on a training mission, the USS Enterprise is critically damaged by Khan Noonien Singh, who has escaped exile on Ceti Alpha V and wants revenge on Kirk. The Genesis planet is created by detonation of the top secret Genesis torpedo, and Spock dies after sacrificing himself to save the Enterprise. (Star Trek 2: The Wrath of Khan) Kirk, McCoy and the rest of the surviving Enterprise crew defy Starfleet orders to commandeer the ship for a mission to the Genesis planet to recover Spock’s body. After they unexpectedly encounter a hostile Klingon Bird-of-Prey, Kirk self-destructs the Enterprise – but Spock is resurrected. (Star Trek 3: The Search for Spock)

2286 - A mysterious space probe appears in Earth orbit, attempting to make contact with now-extinct humpback whales. Kirk and co pilot their commandeered Bird-of-Prey back to 20th century Earth to find some whales. Admiral Kirk is demoted to captain as punishment for his insurrection, and the USS Enterprise-A goes into active service. (Star Trek 4: The Voyage Home)

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2287 - The new Enterprise is commandeered by Spock’s half-brother, Sybok, who plans to meet God (yes, really) at the centre of the galaxy. The question “What does God need with a starship?” has never felt so pertinent. (Star Trek 5: The Final Frontier)

2290 - Hikaru Sulu assumes command of the USS Excelsior, breaking up the Enterprise “dream team” – it was probably about time, to be fair.. (Star Trek 6: The Undiscovered Country)

2293 - Praxis, the Klingon moon responsible for most of the empire’s power production, explodes. With Kirk and the classic crew due for retirement, they set off on one last mission to escort the Klingon ambassador to peace negotiations with the Federation – and end up having to foil a complex plot to scupper the whole thing. (Star Trek 6: The Undiscovered Country) Captain James T Kirk is presumed dead when the Nexus energy ribbon has a close encounter with the newly launched Enterprise-B. Predictably, it’s not the end, though… (Star Trek: Generations)

2330s (exact year unknown) - Data is created by pioneering scientist Dr Noonian Soong. (Datalore, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

2344 - The USS Enterprise-C answers a distress call from a Klingon outpost on Narendra III. Surrounded by Romulan Warbirds, it faces certain destruction until it disappears into a mysterious temporal rift… (Yesterday’s Enterprise, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

2356 - Future Seven of Nine Annika Hansen is assimilated by the Borg, along with her parents on their ship, The Raven. (The Raven, Star Trek: Voyager)

2364 - Commander William T Riker joins the crew of the USS Enterprise-D, under the command of Jean-Luc Picard. Omnipotent being Q appears and puts humanity on trial. (Encounter At Farpoint, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

2365 - Q shows up again, and transports the Enterprise to uncharted space for Starfleet’s first encounter with the Borg. (Q Who, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

2366 - The Enterprise-C emerges from that aforementioned temporal rift and creates a new timeline where the Federation is at war with the Klingons. (Yesterday’s Enterprise, Star Trek: The Next Generation) The Borg show up in Federation space to start an invasion. Jean-Luc Picard is assimilated, becoming Locutus, and Starfleet is almost wiped out at the Battle of Wolf 359. (The Best of Both Worlds, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

2368 - Now an ambassador, Spock turns up on Romulus trying to reunify the Vulcan and Romulan races. (Unification, Star Trek: The Next Generation)

2369 - The Cardassians cease their occupation of Bajor and vacate their space station, Terok Nor. Starfleet moves in and renames it Deep Space Nine, with Benjamin Sisko taking command. It should be a relatively straightforward gig – until a wormhole opens to the Gamma Quadrant on the other side of the galaxy. (Emissary, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

2370 - Starfleet makes first contact with the Dominion, an alliance of races led by shapeshifting Founders from the Gamma Quadrant. (The Search, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

2371 - Turns out James T Kirk wasn’t dead after all – he was just living inside the Nexus energy ribbon where all your dreams come true. When El-Aurian scientist Dr Tolian Soran threatens to destroy entire worlds to get back inside the Nexus, Jean-Luc Picard enlists Kirk’s help to stop him – which doesn’t end well for Kirk, who ends up dead for the final time. The Enterprise-D also meets its end. (Star Trek: Generations) USS Voyager and a ship of Maquis freedom fighters are transported to the distant Delta Quadrant by an alien “caretaker”. The two crews become BFFs implausibly quickly – and for some reason, invite Neelix on board. (Caretaker, Star Trek: Voyager)

2373 - The Borg have another crack at invading Earth. Seemingly defeated, they launch a last ditch attempt to assimilate humanity in the past – so Jean-Luc Picard and crew take their shiny new Enterprise-E back in time to stop them. (Star Trek: First Contact) Meanwhile, back in the Borg’s home territory of the Delta Quadrant, Voyager forms an unlikely alliance with the Collective to battle Species 8472 from “fluidic space”. Borg drone Seven of Nine, Tertiary Adjunct of Unimatrix 01 (AKA, Seven of Nine) joins the Voyager crew. (Scorpion, Star Trek: Voyager) The Dominion War kicks off between the Dominion and the Federation. (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

2375 - The Dominion War ends. Benjamin Sisko, the Bajoran “emissary” moves into the wormhole to commune with its residents – aliens who have no sense of linear time. (What You Leave Behind, Deep Space Nine) The Enterprise crew uncovers a shady Federation plot to relocate the near-immortal inhabitants of a paradise planet, to harness its youth-giving properties. It’s difficult to care about any of it. (Star Trek: Insurrection)

2378 - USS Voyager finally makes it back to Federation space. After seven years away, Ensign Harry Kim is still an Ensign. (Endgame, Star Trek: Voyager)

2379 - Shinzon, a clone of Jean-Luc Picard, takes control of the Romulan senate – and his overtures towards peace with the Federation turn out to be a front for war. The Enterprise eventually stops him, but Data has to sacrifice himself to save the day… (Star Trek: Nemesis)

2380  – The crew of the USS Cerritos travel around the galaxy, specialising in "second contact" situations. (Star Trek: Lower Decks)

2385  – Members of the Romulan Zhat Vash experience the Admonition on the “grief world” of Aia, driving many to madness and suicide. Their leader, Commodore Oh, instigates the uprising of synthetic workers at the Utopia Planitia Fleet Yards on Mars, leaving 92,143 people dead and the planet burning. Facing heavy losses, Starfleet abandons its rescue mission to help rescue the residents of Romulus from an upcoming supernoval. Admiral Jean-Luc Picard resigns in protest. (Star Trek: Picard) 

2387 - With a supernova threatening to destroy Romulus, Spock – still active after all these years, remarkably – attempts to save the planet by using “red matter” to create a black hole that will engulf the exploding star. He fails – and he, and Romulan ship the Narada, are sucked into the black hole, and back into the newly created parallel Kelvin timeline. (Star Trek, 2009)

2390  – Starfleet vessel the Ibn Majid encounters a pair of synthetic lifeforms. Under orders from Commodore Oh, the captain executes the two androids before taking his own life. First Officer Chris Rios is so traumatised by the experience – expunged from Federation records – that he leaves Starfleet six months later. (Star Trek: Picard)

2399  – The long-retired Jean-Luc Picard ventures back into space after years living on the family vineyard. Having discovered that the late Data had a pair of ridiculously advanced twin daughters, the long-retired Jean-Luc Picard ventures back into space after years on the family vineyard. EXTRA BITS After some close encounters with rogue Romulans, militant AI, and a few Borg, Picard succumbs to his terminal Irumodic Syndrome – but is reborn in a new android body. (Star Trek: Picard)

2400 –  Now running Starfleet Academy, Picard finds himself back on a starship when a spatial anomaly appears, broadcasting his name in multiple languages. After ending up in a totalitarian alternative timeline – possibly with a bit of help from Q – he gathers up the crew of La Sirena to travel back to a pivotal event in 2024. (Star Trek: Picard)

3069  – The so-called Burn causes the cataclysmic destruction of dilithium across the galaxy. The Federation is involved in a Temporal War that leads to a galaxy-wide ban on time travel. During this period, Temporal Agent Daniels travels back to 2151 to infiltrate Captain Archer's Enterprise, and overthrow a Suliban plot. (Star Trek: Enterprise/Star Trek: Discovery)

3188 –  Michael Burnham emerges from the wormhole, and joins forces with courier Cleveland 'Book' Booker. (Star Trek: Discovery)

3189 –  DIscovery arrives in the 32nd century and discovers a universe where the Federation has been decimated by the Burn – the biggest power is now criminal syndicate the Emerald Chain. With the spore drive now one of the most important resources in the galaxy, Captain Saru and crew work to discover the cause of the Burn – and restore the Federation to past glories. (Star Trek: Discovery)

3190  – As numerous worlds sign up to rejoin the resurgent Federation, a mysterious Dark Matter Anomaly destroys Book's homeworld and threatens all life in the Alpha Quadrant. (Star Trek: Discovery)

All caught up? Great, now come and discover the best Star Trek episodes that every Trekkie should watch right now, or watch the video below for a complete guide to the Star Wars timeline – that other sci-fi galaxy far, far, away... 

Richard is a freelancer journalist and editor, and was once a physicist. Rich is the former editor of SFX Magazine, but has since gone freelance, writing for websites and publications including GamesRadar+, SFX, Total Film, and more. He also co-hosts the podcast, Robby the Robot's Waiting, which is focused on sci-fi and fantasy. 

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A trekkie’s guide to navigating the star trek timeline.

Scott Bakula as Captain Jonathan Archer looks at the time stream in 'Star Trek Enterprise'

With a narrative that spans seven decades and more than three times as many shows and movies, determining how to watch Star Trek might seem like a daunting prospect. Whether you’re new to the franchise or want to know how to watch the series following the in-universe chronology, this guide should help.

What is a stardate?

To avoid placing Star Trek in a specific century, the franchise has its own system of time: the stardate system. Originally inspired by the Modified Julian date system used by astronomers, writers, and producers have selected numbers using different methods over the years (some more arbitrary than others), which makes it impossible to convert all of the stardates to equivalent calendar dates.

What to know about the Star Trek timeline?

How time works in Star Trek, and how it’s impacted by Starfleet’s time travel shenanigans, is debated amongst the most devoted followers of the Church of Trek. But for casual fans, the first thing it’s necessary to know is that the Star Trek Universe consists of two timelines: the prime timeline and the Kelvin timeline. Although two timelines exist, most of the franchise’s films, shows, and tie-ins take place on the prime timeline.

The second thing to know is that Star Trek’s timelines are always subject to change. Due to the nature of time travel in the franchise, entries appearing earlier on the prime timeline can be impacted and changed (very important to remember) by events that happen later on. For example, the Star Trek: Enterprise season 2 episode “Regeneration” follows up on the events of Star Trek: First Contact .

How to watch the Star Trek prime timeline in chronological order

Here’s how to watch Star Trek ‘s prime timeline in chronological order:

Star Trek: Enterprise (stardates: 2151 – 2155)

Star Trek: The Original Series pilot “The Cage” (stardate: 2254)

Star Trek: Discovery seasons 1 and 2 (stardates: 2256 – 2258)

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (stardates: 2259 – 2260)

Star Trek: The Original Series (stardates: 2265 – 2269)

Star Trek: The Animated Series (stardates: 2269 – 2270)

Star Trek: The Motion Picture (stardate: 2272)

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (stardate: 2285)

Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (stardate: 2285)

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (stardate: 2286)

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (stardate: 2287)

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (stardate: 2293)

Star Trek: The Next Generation (stardates: 2364 – 2370)

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (stardates: 2369 –2375)

Star Trek Generations (stardate: 2371 and some in 2293)

Star Trek: First Contact (stardate: 2373)

Star Trek: Insurrection (stardate: 2375)

Star Trek: Voyager (stardates: 2371 –2378)

Star Trek: Nemesis (stardate: 2379)

Star Trek: Lower Decks (stardates: 2380 – 2381)

Star Trek: Prodigy (stardates: 2383 – 2384)

Star Trek: Picard (stardates: 2399 – 2402)

Star Trek: Discovery seasons 3 and 4 (stardates: 3188 – 3190)

What about the J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek movie trilogy? 

As touched on above, there are two timelines in Star Trek . The J.J. Abrams movies take place on the Kelvin timeline, a parallel timeline created when a 24th-century Romulan, Nero, travels back in time to 2233 (between Ent and Disco season 1, for those keeping track) and splits the timelines in two. 

Most of the Kelvin timeline takes place around the TOS ‘s timeframe but on an alternate timeline. Well, at least so far. 

Here’s how to watch all three movies in the Kelvin timeline in chronological order:

Star Trek (2233)

Star Trek Into Darkness (2259 – 2260)

Star Trek Beyond (2263)

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How to watch Star Trek in order – both release and chronological orders

From The Original Series to Strange New Worlds, here's how to watch the entire Star Trek canon in order.

Star Trek

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It's a hugely exciting time to be a Star Trek fan, especially after the news that we'll be getting a new prequel movie from the director of Andor!

The Star Trek franchise has enjoyed a dramatic revitalisation in recent years, returning to its original home on the small screen to launch a sprawling shared universe of exciting shows.

Coming up next in the world of Star Trek, we've got Star Trek: Discovery season 5 to look forward to, as well as Star Trek: Prodigy season 2 after the series was saved by Netflix – and more! Meanwhile, Star Trek: Picard wrapped up with a third and final season, while we got renewals for shows like Lower Decks .

With all these interconnecting stories, it's not surprising that newcomers to the franchise want to ensure they are watching in the correct order. Fortunately, we can help with that.

Below, we've compiled how to watch Star Trek in release and chronological order, while we also weigh in on the pros and cons of each method. Once you have all the information you need, venture forth into the final frontier.

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How to watch star trek in release order.

Star Trek: The Next Generation - All Good Things

Arguably, the most faithful way of watching Star Trek is in the order each series was made, allowing you to follow the franchise from its inception and explore its universe as the original fans did decades ago.

It makes sense to do it this way as while the shows do jump around in terms of time period, they still find ways to build on what came before in order of release.

In that sense, you're likely to get a slightly more complete picture of Star Trek by watching in this order, instead of piecing the shows together in a chronological timeline.

Star Trek release order (films listed in italics )

  • Star Trek: The Original Series (TOS)
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series (TAS)
  • The first six Star Trek films (The Motion Picture up to Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG)
  • Star Trek: Generations
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (DS9)
  • Star Trek: Voyager (VOY)
  • Star Trek films 8-10 (First Contact, Insurrection, Nemesis)
  • Star Trek: Enterprise (ENT)
  • Star Trek (2009), Star Trek Into Darkness, Star Trek Beyond
  • Star Trek: Discovery (DSC)
  • Star Trek: Short Treks*
  • Star Trek: Picard (PIC)
  • Star Trek: Lower Decks (LOW)
  • Star Trek: Prodigy (PRO)
  • Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (SNW)
  • Untitled Toby Haynes Star Trek prequel film

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* Star Trek: Short Treks premiered after Discovery, hence the listing here. However, Short Treks season 2 sets up some plot threads picked up in Discovery season 2 and beyond, so it's best to alternate between them if you can.

Some people who watch in this order choose to skip over the first three steps and begin with Star Trek: The Next Generation. There is a belief among certain Trekkies that TNG has aged better than The Original Series, making it an easier entry point for newcomers to the franchise.

It would be worth watching the first few episodes of TOS to see what you think of it, but if William Shatner's Captain Kirk doesn't quite cut it for you, feel free to move on to the dulcet tones of Patrick Stewart's Jean-Luc Picard. The two shows have relatively few connections, so you don't need to worry about feeling lost (although they do eventually cross over in a major way in the Star Trek: Generations movie).

How to watch Star Trek in chronological order

Star Trek: Discovery

As previously stated, the various shows in the Star Trek universe take place at different points in a sprawling timeline, so an alternative method is to watch in chronological order.

This comes with pros and cons: on the one hand, it allows you to begin with a modern show, which may be preferable to some people. But on the other hand, some of the references contained in more recent episodes may not land with you in the way they were intended.

Star Trek chronological order (films listed in italics )

  • Star Trek: Enterprise (Year: 2151-2161)
  • Short Trek: The Girl Who Made the Stars (Year: 2230s)
  • Short Trek: The Brightest Star (Year: 2239)
  • Star Trek: The Cage – The Original Series one-off pilot episode (Year: 2254)
  • Short Trek: The Escape Artist (Year: 2250s)
  • Short Trek: Q&A (Year: 2253)
  • Star Trek: Discovery season 1 (Year: 2256)
  • Short Trek: Runaway (Year: 2257)
  • Star Trek: Discovery season 2 (Year: 2258)
  • Short Trek: The Trouble with Edward (Year: 2250s)
  • Short Trek: Ask Not (Year: 2250s)
  • Star Trek: Strange New Worlds (Year: 2259)
  • Star Trek: The Original Series (Year: 2265-2269)
  • Short Trek: Ephraim and Dot (Year: 2267-2285)
  • Star Trek: The Animated Series (Year: 2269-2270)
  • The first six Star Trek films (Year: 2273-2293)
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation (Year: 2364-2370)
  • Star Trek films 7-10: Generations up to Nemesis (Year: 2293-2379)
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (Year: 2369-2375)
  • Star Trek: Voyager (Year: 2371-2378)
  • Star Trek: Lower Decks (2380)
  • Star Trek: Prodigy (Year: 2383)
  • Short Trek: Children of Mars (Year: 2385)
  • Star Trek: Picard seasons 1-3 (Year: 2399-2402)
  • Star Trek: Discovery seasons 3-4 (32nd Century)
  • Short Trek: Calypso (far future, year unknown)

Note – Star Trek: Short Treks was a two-season anthology series, which visits various periods on the franchise timeline. Anything listed as a Short Trek is a single episode of this show (with a runtime between 8 and 18 minutes).

It's not currently confirmed where precisely Toby Haynes' film will sit in the chronology but we do know it'll be a prequel film, taking place "decades" before Star Trek (2009).

For those wondering, the recent trilogy of Star Trek movies directed by JJ Abrams and Justin Lin – Star Trek, Into Darkness and Beyond – are set in an alternate universe, meaning they do not connect to a chronological order of the series.

They do, however, contain references to The Original Series – most notably the return of Leonard Nimoy as Spock – but can be watched at any point as standalone stories.

Star Trek: The Original Series, The Animated Series, The Next Generation, Voyager and Deep Space Nine are available to stream on Netflix .

Star Trek: Picard is exclusive to Prime Video. Sign up for a 30-day free trial of Prime Video and pay £8.99 a month after that.

Star Trek: Discovery and Strange New Worlds can be found on Paramount Plus. Check out more of our Sci-Fi coverage or visit our TV Guide and Streaming Guide to find out what's on tonight.

Try Radio Times magazine today and get 10 issues for only £10 – subscribe now . For more from the biggest stars in TV, listen to The Radio Times Podcast .

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Den of Geek

Star Trek Timeline Explained

How does Star Trek: Discovery relate to the other Star Trek shows and movies? We unravel the history of the future to make it clear.

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This article comes from Den of Geek UK .

The Star Trek canon is a complicated place. Within the TV show and movies alone, there are prequels, sequels, time travel and alternate universes to keep track of – and not all of them happen in the right order. Star Trek Discovery is the latest continuity insert (and a fine one at that) – but how does it relate to everything else?

We begin our look at Star Trek’s timeline around 40 years into “our” future, at a point when the Earth is recovering from World War III…

2063 – Star Trek: First Contact (most of it)

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Star Trek: First Contact

This movie – Star Trek 8 , if you’re keeping track – sees the Star Trek: The Next Generation crew take a jaunt back in time to the era of Zefram Cochrane: the man who invented warp drive technology. The flight of his ship, the Phoenix, attracts the attention of some passing Vulcans who make the titular first contact. It’s an important moment.

read more – 8 Amazing Things About Star Trek: First Contact

2151-2155 – Star Trek: Enterprise

A hundred years later, the crew of Starfleet’s first warp 5 vessel, the Enterprise (registration NX-01) seeks to establish humanity as a significant player in the galaxy, although poor relations between Vulcans and humans keep it from being a simple task. Significantly, the Enterprise is key to defeating the Xindi who attempt to attack and destroy Earth.

read more: The Importance of the Star Trek: Enterprise Characters

2161 – As detailed in the final episode of Star Trek: Enterprise (ENT 4×22: “These Are The Voyages…”) the United Federation of Planets is formed from an alliance between four species: Humans, Vulcans, Andorians and Tellarites. The Enterprise NX-01 is also retired.

2165 – Sarek, Spock’s father, is born on Vulcan.

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2210 – Amanda Grayson, Spock’s mother, is born on Earth.

2230 – Spock is born. Amanda Grayson is 20 and Sarek is 65. Problematic tbh.

2233 – James T. Kirk is born. Just for context, in the divergent timeline of the reboot movies the Romulan terrorist Nero arrives from the future on the Narada, destroys the USS Kelvin and kills George Kirk. Everything after this point doesn’t apply to the reboot timeline, but… that’s a separate article.

2245 – The USS Enterprise (NCC-1701) is launched under the command of Robert M. April.

2254 – The USS Enterprise visits the planet Talos IV while under the command of Captain Christopher Pike. Spock is already serving aboard the vessel at this time. Although the Talosians attempt to capture the crew, they are able to escape. It’s all detailed in “The Menagerie” ( TOS 1×15-16).

2256- ongoing – Star Trek Discovery

Experimental starship Discovery (NCC-1013) fights in the first major Klingon-Federation war. Michael Burnham, Spock’s adopted sister, is part of the crew. Sarek also visits sometimes. At one point Discovery encounters the Enterprise of this era while investigating the red lights phenomena and is placed under temporary command of Captain Christopher Pike.

2265-2269 – Star Trek: The Original Series

Star Trek: The Original Series

Nine years after the events of Star Trek: Discovery , Kirk, Spock, Bones (and the rest) run a five year mission in deep space aboard the Enterprise, exploring the galaxy, establishing tropes, and talking numerous computers to death.

read more: The Most Important Star Trek Original Series Episodes

Notably, on one mission the Enterprise is able to restore a seriously-injured Christopher Pike to Talos IV so that he can live out his life in a psychically-created paradise preferable to reality. Lucky git.

2269-2270 – The Animated Adventures Of Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek

Sometimes deemed non-canon but increasingly less so, this series takes place immediately following the live-action show and mostly features most of the original cast. (Don’t listen too carefully to the voices.)

There’s a comic book series where the animated crew meet the Transformers which is definitely not canon and absolutely nuts but therefore great.

2270s – Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Following an 18-month refit, the Enterprise encounters V’ger prompting Admiral Kirk to reassume command of the ship.

read more – The Troubled Production of Star Trek: The Motion Picture

2285 – Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan

Khan Noonien Singh, having escaped exile at the hands of Captain Kirk ( TOS 1×24: “Space Seed”), exacts revenge on the Enterprise using the Genesis device. The crew defeats Khan but Spock sacrifices his own life to save the Enterprise. Sad.

read more – The Difficult Journey of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Slightly later in 2285 – Star Trek III: The Search For Spock

The Enterprise returns to Earth for repairs before realising that Spock is still alive, having been reborn on the Genesis planet created in the previous film. The Klingons get involved and while attempting to rescue Spock, the Enterprise is destroyed. The crew hijacks a Klingon Bird of Prey and returns Spock to Vulcan and the care of Sarek.

read more – In Defense of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock

2286 – Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

The crew of the Enterprise return to Earth (sans Enterprise) just in time to find it under attack: an invincible alien probe is bombarding the planet with a destructive signal trying to communicate with whales, which humans have driven to extinction. After heading back in time to 1987 to grab a whale, the crew return to 2286 and are placed on board a new version of the Enterprise: the NCC-1701-A.

2287 – Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

Spock’s half-brother Sybok steals the Enterprise and tries to fly it into God. We wish we were making this up.

read more – Examining the Political Themes of Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

2293 – Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

The wall comes down, IN SPACE. When the Russian Klingon power station Moon Chernobyl Praxis explodes, the notoriously insular empire begins discussion with its former enemies to achieve a friendly peace. Kirk and his crew save the peace process from a destabilisation plot by the Romulans. The Enterprise A is decommissioned.

read more – The Political Parallels of Star Trek VI: The Undisovered Country

2293 – Star Trek: Generations (some of it)

The Enterprise B (NCC-1701-B) is launched and Captain Kirk is thought to have died following an encounter with the mysterious energy ribbon known as The Nexus.

2344 – The Enterprise C (NCC-1701-C) is active under the command of Captain Rachel Garrett. You can learn more in TNG 3×15, “Yesterday’s Enterprise,” which is a great episode.

read more – Does Star Trek: Generations Deserve Another Chance?

2364-2370 – Star Trek: The Next Generation

The crew of the Enterprise D (NCC-1701-D) – Picard, Riker, Data (and the rest) travel around the galaxy encountering moral dilemmas which can usually be solved by reversing the polarity of something.

read more – The Best Star Trek: The Next Generation Episodes

2368 – Sarek dies ( TNG 5×01 – “Unification”)

2369-2375: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Things get confusing as TV shows begin to overlap. Commander Sisko unleashes the dragon aboard the strategically-important space station, Deep Space Nine.

read more – The Best Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Stories

2371: Star Trek Generations (the rest of it)

Picard et al rescue Kirk from the Nexus, proving that he didn’t die in 2293 after all. Although he later does in fact die. No backsies this time. Except in that one novel series. The Enterprise D is also turned into space-confetti.

2371-2378: Star Trek Voyager

Star Trek Voyager

Captain Kathryn Janeway gets the USS Voyager (registration unimportant) stranded in the Delta Quadrant and they spend 7 years trying to get home while stopping to check every molecule of every asteroid they so much as brush against. Harry Kim dies and is replaced by a replica created by a weird time thingy but no-one really talks about it.

read more – Why the Star Trek: Voyager Premiere is Worth a Rewatch

2373: Star Trek: First Contact (the rest of it)

Aboard the newly-commissioned Enterprise E (NCC-170-ah you get it by now) the Next Generation Crew follows a Borg ship back in time and prevents them from disrupting First Contact with the Vulcans. See the start of this article.

2375: Star Trek Insurrection

Nothing important happens in this one but it’s not as bad as people think.

2379: Star Trek Nemesis

Some important stuff DOES happen in this one because Data dies, but in this case it IS as bad as people think. Janeway shows up, promoted to Admiral, likely because she never wants to see the inside of a starship again.

read more – What Went Wrong With Star Trek: Nemesis?

2387: Star Trek (reboot)

Romulus is destroyed when a nearby star goes supernova. Spock is unable to stop it. A grieving Romulan named Nero travels back in time and creates the divergent JJ Abrams timeline which remains outside the scope of this article. However, the destruction of Romulus and the strange disappearance of Spock remain canon. Who knows what everyone else is up to?

Some time after 2387: Untitled Picard Series

The producers of the eagerly-awaited untitled Picard series have explained that the destruction of Romulus and dissolution of the Romulan empire will be a springboard for some of the events in this TV show, in which Picard has (likely) left Starfleet behind for good.

Sometimes around 3256: Short Treks’ “Calypso”

As someone pointed out in our comment section, one of Discovery’s latest Short Treks , “Calypso,” takes place roughly 1,000 years following the events of  Discovery , catching up with the abandoned ship’s computer, Zora. This potentially concerning peak into the Federation’s future has yet to be addressed in Discovery .

This, broadly, is where established canon ends. Further glimpses in the future (such as the future timeline seen in TNG finale, “All Good Things) can only be considered potential futures.

Have we missed anything? Let us know in the comments!

James Hunt

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Michael Dorn, Jonathan Frakes, Gates McFadden, Marina Sirtis, Brent Spiner, LeVar Burton, and Patrick Stewart in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987)

Set almost 100 years after Captain Kirk's 5-year mission, a new generation of Starfleet officers sets off in the U.S.S. Enterprise-D on its own mission to go where no one has gone before. Set almost 100 years after Captain Kirk's 5-year mission, a new generation of Starfleet officers sets off in the U.S.S. Enterprise-D on its own mission to go where no one has gone before. Set almost 100 years after Captain Kirk's 5-year mission, a new generation of Starfleet officers sets off in the U.S.S. Enterprise-D on its own mission to go where no one has gone before.

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  • Trivia When the cast decided to lobby for a salary increase, Wil Wheaton 's first offer from the producers was to instead have his character promoted to Lieutenant. His response was, "So what should I tell my landlord when I can't pay my rent? 'Don't worry, I just made Lieutenant'?!"
  • Goofs It is claimed that Data can't use contractions (Can't, Isn't, Don't, etc) yet there are several instances throughout the series where he does. One of the first such examples is heard in Encounter at Farpoint (1987) , where Data uses the word "Can't" while the Enterprise is being chased by Q's "ship".

[repeated line]

Capt. Picard : Engage!

  • Crazy credits The model of the Enterprise used in the opening credits is so detailed, a tiny figure can be seen walking past a window just before the vessel jumps to warp speed.
  • Alternate versions The first and last episodes were originally broadcast as two-hour TV movies, and were later re-edited into two one-hour episodes each. Both edits involved removing some scenes from each episode.
  • Connections Edited into Reading Rainbow: The Bionic Bunny Show (1988)

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Star Trek movies in order: Chronological and release

Untangle the different timelines and get the popcorn: Here are the Star Trek movies in order — both chronological and release.

Commander Spock from Star Trek (2009)

  • Chronological order
  • Prime Timeline

The Original Series movies

The next generation movies.

  • Kelvin Timeline
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Upcoming Star Trek movies

We've got a guide to watching the Star Trek movies in order, decloaking off our starboard side!

So long as movies stick numbers on the ends of their titles, it’s easy to watch them in order. Once they start branching out, however, things can get a little muddled, especially when reboots come along and start the whole process over from scratch. 

You may have heard that the even-numbered ones are good and the odd-numbered ones are not. That’s spot on for the films starring the cast of The Original Series (aka Kirk and friends) falls apart once you reach the tenth entry in the series. It would probably be worth your while to have this list of the Star Trek movies, ranked worst to best around to steer clear of the clunkers. Look, we’re not going to pretend everything here is worth two hours of your day, we’re just letting you know which came out after which.

Should your Trek appetite remain unsatiated after your movie watchathon, feel free to pull from either our list of the best Star Trek: The Original series episode s or best Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes . Either one will set you up for a weekend jam-packed with great Trek moments. Consult our Star Trek streaming guide for all the details on where to watch the movies and shows online 

Star Trek movies: Chronological order

Below is the quick version of our list if you just need to check something to win an argument, but it comes with a lot of in-universe time travel-related caveats that we'll explain below.

  • Star Trek: The Motion Picture
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
  • Star Trek V: The Final Frontier
  • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country
  • Star Trek: Generations
  • Star Trek: First Contact
  • Star Trek: Insurrection
  • Star Trek: Nemesis
  • Star Trek Into Darkness
  • Star Trek Beyond

Star Trek: Prime Timeline

The first thing you need to know about the Star Trek films is that while they travel back and forth in time, they also diverge into two (for now) different timelines. The films of the original crew (well, the first iteration of them, anyway – more on that later) are all in what is known as the Prime Timeline. 

Within the Prime Timeline, the movies are then split between The Original Series movies and The Next Generation movies.

1. Star Trek: The Motion Picture

  • Release date: December 8, 1979
  • Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley

This is the film that brought the voyages of the U.S.S. Enterprise to the big screen. An energy cloud is making its way toward Earth, destroying everything in its path. Kirk and crew intercept it and discover an ancient NASA probe at the heart of the cloud. Voyager – known as V’ger now – encountered a planet of living machines, learned all it could, and returned home to report its findings, only to find no one who knew how to answer. It’s a slow-paced film, and the costumes are about as 70s as they come, but there’s classic Star Trek at the heart of this film.

2. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

  • Release date: June 4, 1982
  • Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Ricardo Montalban

Ask a Star Trek fan what the best Star Trek movie is and more often than not, you’ll get Khan as your answer. A sequel to the events of the “Space Seed” episode of The Original Series, Khan is a retelling of Moby Dick with Khan throwing reason to the wind as he hunts his nemesis, James T. Kirk. Montalban delivers a pitch-perfect performance, giving us a Khan with charisma and obsession in equal parts.

3. Star Trek III: The Search for Spock

  • Release date: June 1, 1984

Spock might have died in The Wrath of Khan, but this third entry set up the premise for his return, with the creation of the Genesis planet. Essentially a heist movie in reverse, Search for Spock has the crew defying orders from Starfleet in an attempt to reunite Spock’s consciousness with his newly-rejuvenated body. It’s not a great movie, but it does include two very important events: the rebirth of Spock and the death of Kirk’s son at the hands of the Klingons. That’ll be important a few flicks from now.   

4. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

  • Release date: November 26, 1986
  • Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Catherine Hicks

If Star Trek fans don’t say Khan is the best Star Trek movie, odds are very high they say Voyage Home is. It’s a funny film where the mission isn’t destruction, but creation – or more accurately, repairing the devastating effects of humankind’s ecological short-sightedness. 

A probe arrives at Earth, knocking out the power of everything in its path as it looks for someone to respond to its message (yeah, it happens a lot). This time, however, the intended recipient is the long-extinct blue whale. To save Earth, Kirk and co. go back in time to 1980s San Francisco to snag some blue whales. The eco-messaging isn’t exactly subtle, but it doesn’t get in the way of a highly enjoyable movie.

5. Star Trek V: The Final Frontier

  • Release date: June 9, 1989

A writers’ strike and Shatner’s directorial skills (or lack thereof) doomed this film before a single scene was shot. The core plot is actually pretty good: Spock’s half-brother hijacks the Enterprise so that he can meet God, which he believes to be… himself. Some Star Trek fans have an odd fondness for this movie, as it showcases the camaraderie of Kirk, Spock, and McCoy when they’re off-duty.

6. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

  • Release date: December 6, 1991
  • Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Christopher Plummer

Right, so if that Star Trek fan you’ve been talking to doesn’t choose either Khan or Voyage Home as the best Star Trek movie ever, they almost certainly name Undiscovered Country (and if they don’t, they have highly questionable taste, frankly). The Klingon moon of Praxis explodes, putting the entire Klingon race at risk. The Enterprise hosts a diplomatic entourage of Klingons, much to Kirk’s discomfort. 

Remember how Klingons murdered Kirk’s son? Well, he certainly hasn’t forgotten. Kirk’s lingering rage makes him the perfect patsy for the murder of the Klingon Chancellor, sending him and McCoy to a prison planet and setting the stage for war. Christopher Plummer is perfection as a Shakespeare-quoting Klingon general with no taste for peace.

7. Star Trek: Generations

  • Release date: November 18, 1994
  • Cast: Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, Brent Spiner

And thus the torch is passed from the crew of The Original Series to that of The Next Generation. It’s a bit of a fumble, to be honest, but they all did their best to get Kirk and Picard into the same film and have it make sense. Malcolm McDowell plays Soran, a scientist who will stop at nothing to control the Nexus, a giant space rainbow that exists outside of space-time. 

Soran lost his family when his home world was destroyed and he wants to re-join them (or at least an illusion of them) in the Nexus. He’s not so much a villain as a tragic figure, but the Nexus makes a meeting between Kirk and Picard possible. Not all that sensible, but possible.

8. Star Trek: First Contact

  • Release date: November 22, 1996
  • Cast: Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner, Alice Krige

Okay, no, for real, if your Star Trek pal didn’t pick Khan or Voyage Home or… oh, nevermind. Cueing off the iconic two-part episode “Best of Both Worlds,” in which Picard is assimilated by the Borg, First Contact sees the collective traveling back in time in order to disrupt First Contact, the day Earth’s first foray into space attracted the attention of the Vulcans, kicking off the events that would eventually lead to Starfleet’s victory over the Borg. The Borg Queen torments Picard with visions of the past and tempts Data with humanity, going so far as to give him some human skin. 

The fight with the Borg aboard the Enterprise is thrilling, and the work on the surface to get first contact back on track is fun. Plus, there’s just nothing like Patrick Stewart turning it up to 11 as he lashes out at the enemy that haunts his dreams.

9. Star Trek: Insurrection

  • Release date: December 11, 1998
  • Cast: Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, F. Murray Abraham

Essentially an episode inflated for the big screen, Insurrection is about the Federation conspiring to displace a planet’s population in order to harvest the planet’s unique resource – super healing metaphasic particles. In addition to the rejuvenating natural resource, the Ba’ku also have access to exceptional technology, which they shun in favor of a more simple lifestyle. 

Data malfunctions, the villains are Federation allies (and former Ba’ku!), Picard gets to knock boots with a local – Insurrection is the very definition of “fine.” Chronologically, Insurrection is relevant for rekindling the romance between Riker and Troi, but not much else.

10. Star Trek: Nemesis

  • Release date: December 13, 2002
  • Cast: Patrick Stewart, Brent Spiner, Tom Hardy

Before he mumbled his way into our hearts as Bane, Tom Hardy was Shinzon, a clone of Picard the Romulans created in an eventually abandoned attempt to infiltrate Starfleet. Shinzon is dying, and all that will save him is a transfusion of Picard’s blood. Unfortunately, Shinzon also happens to be a megalomaniac who happens to want to destroy all life on Earth and maybe a few other planets, too, if he’s feeling saucy. 

Nemesis is notable mostly for killing Data with a noble sacrifice, only to resurrect him moments later in a duplicate body found earlier by the Enterprise crew.

Star Trek: Kelvin Timeline

The last of the Prime Timeline movies failed to impress at the box office, so it was a few years before anyone tried to bring the Enterprise back to the big screen. Rather than lean on any of the TV crews, this new slate of movies would serve as a reboot, welcoming new audiences while honoring long-time fans. Welcome to the Kelvin Timeline. (For all the ins and outs, check out our Star Trek: Kelvin Timeline explained article).

11. Star Trek

  • Release date: May 8, 2009
  • Cast: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Karl Urban

Back to the beginning! Star Trek introduces us to James T. Kirk, Spock, and “Bones” McCoy as they meet and join the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise. Though the plot is a relatively straightforward affair of a Romulan named Nero trying to destroy the Earth. His anger borne out of grief, what matters most is how it all came to be. In the future, Spock – the Prime Timeline version – tries to save Romulus from being destroyed by a supernova, but fails. Both his ship and Nero’s are kicked back in time, setting off a chain of events that diverge from the original, “true” timeline. 

The name “Kelvin” refers to the U.S.S. Kelvin, the ship heroically captained by Kirk’s father, which is destroyed in the opening moments of the movie.

12. Star Trek Into Darkness

  • Release date: May 16, 2013
  • Cast: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Benedict Cumberbatch

The benefit of the Kelvin Timeline is that it not only allows Star Trek to explore canon material – such as Khan (he of the Wrath) – but to do something completely new with it. Khan features heavily in Into Darkness, but he has no beef with Kirk. Instead, a Starfleet Admiral is threatening the lives of Khan’s crew, forcing them to craft weapons of mass destruction. 

Khan inevitably eludes captivity and strikes out against Starfleet, killing Captain Pike (and a bunch of others) in the process. Kirk and company eventually take Khan down, but not before Kirk sacrifices himself to save his crew. Don’t worry, these things don’t last in either Star Trek timeline, as Kirk gets better moments later thanks to *checks notes* Khan's super blood.

13. Star Trek Beyond

  • Release date: July 22, 2016
  • Cast: Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Idris Elba

Beyond leans into the camaraderie of Kirk, Spock, and McCoy now that they’ve had some time together, much to the movie’s benefit. The Enterprise is lured to Altamid under false pretenses, leading to much of the crew being marooned on the planet. The architect of the deception was Krall, who wants an opportunity to return to a galaxy where war is the order of the day. 

Beyond is a significant point in the timeline for two reasons. First, it sadly marked the death of Spock Prime due to the passing of Leonard Nimoy. Second, it culminates in the Enterprise embarking on the five-year-mission that started everything back in 1966.

Star Trek movies: Release order

If you can't be bothered remembering two different orders for the Star Trek movies then we've got good news for you — the release order is identical to the chronological order that we've shown above (accounting for the Kelvin timeline as it's own entity anyway).

The full run of Star Trek films currently tops out at 13 entries; the fate of the 14th was hidden within a nebula of conflicting information. “Star Trek 4” was slated for December 22, 2023, but given that filming had yet to begin as of July 2022, it seems inevitable that date will change. Back in February 2022, Paramount that the principal cast would be returning for the fourth installment of the Kelvin timeline, a claim quickly disputed by the agents of those selfsame actors. Awkward.

Soon after, however, Chris Pine eventually signed on the dotted line, and his shipmates reached their own agreements. As of right now, Kirk (Pine), Spock (Zachary Quinto), McCoy (Karl Urban, assuming he can make it work around filming of The Boys), Scotty (Simon Pegg), Uhura (Zoe Saldaña), and Sulu (John Cho) are all ready to beam up and get filming. Sadly, this will be the first of the Kelvin films to not feature Anton Yelchin as Pavel Chekov. Yelchin died in an accident at his home in 2016. It’s currently unclear if Chekov will be recast or if a different character will take his place on the bridge of the Enterprise.

Though the Kelvin timeline is often referred to as “J.J. Abrams Trek,” he won’t be directing Star Trek 4; Matt Shakman will take on that responsibility, leaving Abrams to produce. As for what it will be about, that’s anyone’s guess, but Chris Pine told Deadline he hopes this one tells a smaller story that appeals to the core Trek audience. “Let’s make the movie for the people that love this group of people, that love this story, that love Star Trek,” he said. “Let’s make it for them and then, if people want to come to the party, great.” It’s a strategy that makes sense; the disappointment with recent Trek films hasn’t been their content so much as their box office. A Trek film with a smaller scope (and budget) would almost certainly have a very healthy profit margin while also resonating with the fanbase.   

With no new announcements coming from San Diego Comic-Con 2022, it seems that we’ll have to wait for any more insight into the next Star Trek film. Sill, recent comments from Paramount CEO Brian Robbins have us cautiously optimistic: “We’re deep into [Star Trek 4] with J.J. Abrams, and it feels like we’re getting close to the starting line and excited about where we’re going creatively,” he told Variety . 

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Susan Arendt is a freelance writer, editor, and consultant living in Burleson, TX. She's a huge sci-fi TV and movie buff, and will talk your Vulcan ears off about Star Trek. You can find more of her work at Wired, IGN, Polygon, or look for her on Twitter: @SusanArendt. Be prepared to see too many pictures of her dogs.

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Star Trek Can Revisit the Kelvin Timeline Through the Next Generation

The Kelvin Timeline seems all-but abandoned by the Star Trek franchise, but if it returns it should be in The Next Generation era of that timeline.

Thanks to series like Strange New Worlds and Lower Decks , the Star Trek franchise is again thriving on TV. However, the rebooted film series that began in 2009 is all but forgotten. With seven years between today and Star Trek: Beyond , a fourth film in the series seems unlikely. However, if Star Trek does want to revisit the so-called Kelvin Timeline, they should do it by telling a story in The Next Generation era.

The continuity that began with J.J. Abrams' Star Trek has its name from the film's inciting incident. With the help of some sci-fi technology, the destruction of the planet Romulus sends a gigantic mining vessel back in time to the day of James T. Kirk's birth. His father served on the USS Kelvin, dying on the bridge while keeping the vindictive Romulan villains at bay. This means the bulk of the film occurs earlier in the characters' lives than in Star Trek: The Original Series . However, the last mention of the Kelvin Timeline in canon came from the franchise's far future. In Season 3 of Star Trek: Discovery , viewers see a Starfleet officer who crosses from the Kelvin Timeline into the Prime Universe. This alien character is wearing a Starfleet uniform of the kind seen in the early seasons of Star Trek: The Next Generation . If the franchise ever revisits this corner of its multiverse, the 24th century is the perfect way to do it.

RELATED: How Star Trek Connected the Kelvin Timeline to the Prime Universe

A Next Generation Story in the Kelvin Timeline Can Give the Universe Closure

One thing the Kelvin Timeline has in common with The Next Generation crew is neither group's final film was supposed to be their last movie. Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country was the perfect send-off for the original Kirk, Spock and company. Yet, both Beyond and Star Trek: Nemesis served as appropriate finales for the characters. Luckily, the USS Enterprise-D crew had Star Trek: Picard Season 3 to round out their stories. That crew might also be the perfect one to revisit the Kelvin Timeline and show how closely it came to becoming the utopia franchise creator Gene Roddenberry envisioned.

It would also allow for exactly 100 years to pass between Beyond and the new story. The timeline of Star Trek is convoluted , but best guesses put the final Kelvin film in the year 2263. In the Prime Universe, the Enterprise-D launches under the command of Jean-Luc Picard in 2363. Despite this span of time, a remarkable number of Star Trek: TOS characters are still alive. Vulcans can live 200 years, meaning Spock is effectively middle-aged. An extremely elderly Dr. McCoy appeared in The Next Generation 's pilot episode, getting a tour of the Enterprise from Data. Scotty was discovered alive in a crashed shuttle, stored in the transporter's "pattern buffer." And Star Trek: Generations revealed that Kirk survived his first apparent death in the Nexus.

The biggest problem for the Kelvin Timeline movies was their budget. Star Trek movies turn a profit, but one film will never bring in the elusive billion-dollar box office. Setting a fourth movie in The Next Generation era allows filmmakers to focus on a new cast of characters. Yet, it still allows big names like Spock, Kirk, Bones, and Scotty to appear in smaller (read: cheaper) roles. However, the main reason to tell the story in this era is to allow the Kelvin Timeline to become the aspirational, hopeful version of Star Trek the movies never quite achieved.

RELATED: The New Star Trek Series Could Erase the Kelvin Timeline, but Shouldn't

A Star Trek: TNG-Era Story Can Brighten the Darker Kelvin Timeline

While there is plenty of hope in the 21st-century Star Trek film trilogy, there is also a lot of tragedy. Specifically, the destruction of Vulcan left deep scars on Starfleet and its people. A handful of years away from the arguably excessive tragedy, the change makes sense. A century away from it? That provides some narrative space for healing and the formation of a more familiar Federation. Roddenberry's vision of Starfleet evolved between Star Trek: TOS and TNG . Similar changes could happen in the Kelvin Timeline, highlighting how the galaxy emerged from a time of tragedy stronger and even more united. It could also touch on many Prime Universe canon story beats.

During an appearance on The Next Generation, Spock committed the later part of his life to bringing Vulcan logic to the Romulans. He hoped it would lead to reunification with the Vulcans and peace with the Federation. Given the destruction of Vulcan in the Kelvin Timeline , Spock undertaking this mission carries more narrative weight. The story could include Bones, Scotty and any other 23rd Century characters the filmmakers find sci-fi ways to bring to the future. And, of course, they could all rescue Kirk from the Nexus, this time not dropping a bridge on him. The Kelvin Timeline characters get narrative closure, and they also get to see the idyllic future their struggles and losses helped create.

5 Controversial Star Trek: The Next Generation Scenes Nobody Likes To Talk About

Work pilots shuttlecraft

For all its philosophical contemplation of the human condition and nuanced exploration of sociopolitical issues, the "Star Trek" universe is not without its more bizarre moments. From problematic tropes and cheesy practical effects to poorly executed social allegories, sometimes the optimistic humanist message gets a little bogged down in questionable writing and production choices. And like every other series in the Trek canon, "Star Trek: The Next Generation" has its share of controversial scenes. A few are so cringy or even downright uncomfortable that some fans don't even like to think about them, let alone talk about them.

Sure, "The Next Generation" is loaded with epic Jean-Luc Picard moments and triumphs of holodeck LARPing. But even in one of sci-fi's best franchises, things like weak character send-offs, misguided attempts at handling complex sociopolitical issues, and inconsistent character development can occasionally creep in. Hang on to your bat'leth as we take on five controversial scenes in "The Next Generation" that no one likes to talk about.

Pulaski's final scene in Shades of Gray

The only clip show episode in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" — the finale of Season 2, "Shades of Gray" — is widely considered one of the series' worst episodes. It begins with Commander William Riker (Jonathan Frakes) and Geordi LaForge (LeVar Burton) conducting a geological survey that goes south when Riker is stung by a sentient swamp vine with nightmarish retractable blue claws. Almost immediately, Riker begins to suffer from numbness and paralysis that Dr. Pulaski (Diana Muldaur) attributes to a neurotoxic virus. To save him, Pulaski has to use giant brain needles that stimulate his darkest memories, giving viewers a Wonkaesque trip through the show's most dramatic Riker-centric nightmare fuel.

After working tirelessly to bring Riker back from the brink, a relieved Pulaski gives Riker a quick update on his condition. When the camera pans away, we never see her again — and fans of the good doctor hated it. Although Muldaur later told People  that she did not enjoy her time on the series, it would still have been nice to see her character get a proper send-off rather than a weak clip show denouement.

Yar's pointless death in Skin of Evil

In terms of terrible send-offs, it doesn't get any worse than Tasha Yar's death scene in "Skin of Evil." Like Diana Muldaur, Yar actor Denise Crosby didn't have the best experience working on the series. Crosby explained to StarTrek.com , "I was just stage dressing. I chose to leave instead of just being satisfied with that." Roddenberry agreed Yar's death would add depth to the series. For a complex warrior like Yar, that should have meant some an epic emotional send-off. But instead, she was unceremoniously bodied by a sentient black puddle out of seemingly nowhere.

After a shuttle transporting Troi crash-lands on the planet Vagra II, the investigating away team encounters the literal embodiment of evil in an ambulatory slime calling itself Armus. When Yar demands Armus let her people pass to their shuttlecraft, he smacks her with an energy shock, killing her instantly. Despite a heroic effort on Crusher's part, the medical team is unable to revive her. Worse, Armus shortly reveals he did it for kicks.

Armus's sadistic attack was one of the most hated moments in "The Next Generation" — so hated that even Yar acknowledges it in the alternate timeline of "Yesterday's Enterprise." After a spacetime rift causes Guinan to encounter a reality-shifted Yar who never died, alternate Yar laments that she "died a senseless death in the other timeline."

The bros discuss Troi's reproductive rights in The Child

Science fiction loves a good mystical pregnancy and unfortunately "Star Trek" is no exception. The Season 2 opener begins with the ship's counselor becoming impregnated by a tiny purple energy orb the ship encounters while floating through space. And things only go downhill from there.

Empath that she is, Troi immediately realizes something is up and contacts Dr. Pulaski, who in turn tells Picard that Troi is pregnant. Cut to the briefing room for what may very possibly be one of sci-fi's best metaphoric representations of the controversy over women's reproductive rights — even if it is one of the most problematic scenes in "Star Trek." As a distressed and sullen-looking Troi sits alone at one end of the conference table, Picard announces — without context — that she is pregnant to the top-ranking members of his bridge crew.

Pulaski launches into an explanation about the embryo's alarmingly rapid fetal development. But the crew's reactions are equally alarming. Despite having learned Troi is expected to give birth in 36 hours, Riker demands, "Who's the father?" After Picard announces, "Our purpose here is to determine what is to be done about this," Worf, Data, and Riker — three male officers — argue over whether they should abort the fetus, study it, or abort it and then study it. Although no one seems particularly interested in Troi's feelings , she assertively interrupts them, declaring her intent to carry the baby to term.

Soren's post-conversion change-of-heart in The Outcast

"The Outcast" is another example of a problematic "Next Generation" effort at tackling social commentary, giving "Star Trek" fans one of the most depressing scenes in the franchise. The episode revolves around the Enterprise's interactions with the androgynous J'naii while assisting them with a rescue mission in a pocket of null space. Riker teams up with J'naii named Soren who secretly identifies as female — something that's forbidden in her society. And because Riker can't help but Riker, he immediately finds himself in a situationship with her.

While discussing their mutual feelings, Soren warns him, "On our world, these feelings are forbidden. Those who are discovered are shamed and ridiculed." Worse still, J'naii who are caught breaking gender norms are forced to endure conversion therapy. "Only by undergoing psychotectic therapy and having all elements of gender eliminated can they be accepted into society again," Soren reveals. After a moving speech where Soren declares she doesn't need to be cured but instead needs understanding, Soren is carted off to conversion camp. By the time Riker and Worf stage a rescue mission, she's already been reprogrammed, telling him, "I was sick. I had these terrible urges, and that's why I reached out to you." While the conclusion was sadly pretty true to what many experienced during this era, this disappointing outcome is one of many reasons the episode wasn't universally loved in the LGBTQ community.

Desperate Riker gets murderous in Parallels

One of the most controversial "Next Generation" scenes comes in "Parallels." Upon returning victorious from a bat'leth tournament, Worf is thrust back and forth between alternate realities aboard the Enterprise. It's a pretty cool concept, with the audience experiencing the trippy reality shifts from Worf's perspective. In one reality, Worf is a commanding officer, and in another, he is married to Deanna Troi. He and the crew must work to solve the mystery of what's happening to him while gaining different pieces of the puzzle found in each distinct reality. They ultimately discover a quantum gateway to infinite realities determined by individual choices.

When the fissure destabilizes, realities begin to merge, causing dozens of Enterprises to appear on the viewscreen. As they realize Worf needs to travel back through the fissure in his shuttlecraft, the Enterprise crew faces an unusual enemy: themselves. While every other Enterprise agrees to the plan to seal the fissure, one begins to attack Worf's shuttlecraft. A disheveled Riker appears on the screen declaring that they refuse to return to their world, where the Borg have taken over. When the two ships exchange fire, Riker's is destroyed. For many Trekkies, this brief encounter was one of the few moments in the franchise so disturbing it rivaled  the controversial decision to terminate Tuvix in "Voyager."

Giant Freakin Robot

Giant Freakin Robot

Star Trek: The Next Generation Almost Wiped Out All Vulcans

Posted: March 8, 2024 | Last updated: March 9, 2024

star trek spock

Most Star Trek fans are familiar with The Next Generation episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise:” it featured the Enterprise-C traveling forward in time and changing history for the worse, leaving Captain Picard with the unenviable task of fixing the future by sending the earlier ship and crew back to the past where they would be killed. As wild as the plot was, however, an earlier version of the script had founder of Vulcan logic killed in the distant past, effectively destroying the Vulcan race as we know it.

<p>While he didn’t write the teleplay, Eric Stillwell co-developed the story that would become the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise.” He was a major fan of The Original Series and came up with a wild story involving Vulcans using the Guardian of Forever, a portal that allows explorers to travel through time and space. By accident, a Vulcan science team visiting the ancient past of their own planet ends up killing Surak, completely changing their planetary history.</p>

The Untimely Death of Surak

While he didn’t write the teleplay, Eric Stillwell co-developed the story that would become the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise.” He was a major fan of The Original Series and came up with a wild story involving Vulcans using the Guardian of Forever, a portal that allows explorers to travel through time and space. By accident, a Vulcan science team visiting the ancient past of their own planet ends up killing Surak, completely changing their planetary history.

<p>Depending on how much Star Trek you’ve watched, you probably have a few questions, including who the heck Surak is and why he’s so important to Vulcan history. In the early days of their development, Vulcans were not a logical race: instead, they were driven by emotions and were extremely violent in almost every possible way. Surak was a prominent leader who preached the benefits of forsaking violence and embracing logic, and this time period is later referred to as the “Time of Awakening.”</p>

Surak Made The Vulcans Who They Are

Depending on how much Star Trek you’ve watched, you probably have a few questions, including who the heck Surak is and why he’s so important to Vulcan history. In the early days of their development, Vulcans were not a logical race: instead, they were driven by emotions and were extremely violent in almost every possible way. Surak was a prominent leader who preached the benefits of forsaking violence and embracing logic, and this time period is later referred to as the “Time of Awakening.”

<p>That Star Trek episode (“Relics”) is deliberately vague on the details of synthehol, and that’s understandable–the last thing we’d want in the cool Scotty episode is a five-minute technobabble explainer. Still, Data’s words have haunted us for years because he seems to be saying that those who imbibe synthehol can shake off its inebriating effects at will. That’s obviously beneficial when the crew might be summoned to emergency stations at any time, but the science on how this could possibly work is even shaky by the standards of Star Trek.</p>

The Vulcans Are Now Romulans

In this earlier vision for the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “Yesterday’s Enterprise,” the plot was driven by a simple question: what would the Vulcans have been like without the Time of Awakening? Picard and crew quickly discover that in this altered reality, there is functionally no difference between the Vulcans and the Romulans (more on this in a bit). In fact, the Vulcans have created an aggressive empire that has taken on the entire galaxy and has dwindled the Federation down to a few sad remnants. 

Why would the famous Star Trek good guys the Vulcans be almost exactly like Romulans without the teachings of Surak? In the deep Star Trek lore, the Romulans are Vulcans…specifically, modern Romulans are descendants of Vulcans who hated Surak’s teachings and left the Vulcan planet shortly after Surak’s death. They ended up colonizing Romulus and Remus, the latter of which featured heavily in the plot of Star Trek: Nemesis.

<p>So, how does the “Yesterday’s Enterprise” story we never got to see end? Spock’s famous father Sarek had been on the ship to welcome the Vulcan science team back from their voyage into the past, and he ends up traveling into the past and replacing Surak. By taking the famous Vulcan’s place, Sarek is able to restore the timeline, and the fact that he has to abandon all of his friends, family, and duties in the future makes this a very noble sacrifice.</p>

Sarek Saves The Vulcan Race

So, how does the “Yesterday’s Enterprise” story we never got to see end? Spock’s famous father Sarek had been on the ship to welcome the Vulcan science team back from their voyage into the past, and he ends up traveling into the past and replacing Surak. By taking the famous Vulcan’s place, Sarek is able to restore the timeline, and the fact that he has to abandon all of his friends, family, and duties in the future makes this a very noble sacrifice.

<p>As you can tell, this Star Trek story idea had very little in common with the “Yesterday’s Enterprise” final broadcast episode, though this version did similarly bring Denise Crosby back to play Tasha Yar. However, we can’t get over how epic in scope this episode could have been, tying together elements of The Original Series and The Next Generation while sacrificing a famous character and nearly destroying two races (the Romulans would never come to be and the Vulcans as we know them would never come to exist).</p><p>Part of us wishes we could have experienced this episode that never was. The other part of us, however, has taken the message of the final episode to heart: wanting to change the past is dangerous, and it never works out the way you’d expect.</p>

Yesterday’s Enterprise

As you can tell, this Star Trek story idea had very little in common with the “Yesterday’s Enterprise” final broadcast episode, though this version did similarly bring Denise Crosby back to play Tasha Yar. However, we can’t get over how epic in scope this episode could have been, tying together elements of The Original Series and The Next Generation while sacrificing a famous character and nearly destroying two races (the Romulans would never come to be and the Vulcans as we know them would never come to exist).

Part of us wishes we could have experienced this episode that never was. The other part of us, however, has taken the message of the final episode to heart: wanting to change the past is dangerous, and it never works out the way you’d expect.

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Screen Rant

Every soong character brent spiner plays in star trek.

Besides playing Data and all of his siblings in Star Trek, Brent Spiner portrayed the android's creator as well as various other Soongs in history.

  • Brent Spiner's diverse acting career within the Star Trek universe allowed him to play every Soong character, showcasing his range.
  • Dr. Noonien Soong, Data's creator, focused on creating androids, while Dr. Arik Soong's experiments led to genetic disasters.
  • Dr. Adam Soong, a villainous figure, sought personal acclaim over the well-being of his cloned daughters and was willing to murder to achieve it.

Most remembered for his turn as Lt. Commander Data on Star Trek: The Next Generation , Brent Spiner also went on to play every single Soong character that has been introduced in the Star Trek universe. Starting with Data's creator, Dr. Noonien Soong on TNG , the celebrated character actor has been tapped to play different Soongs throughout Trek 's extended timeline. Each new Soong gave Spiner a chance to show off his acting range , and they also fleshed out the dynasty of Data's mysterious cyberneticist father. The complicated Soong lineage stretches back to the 21st century as seen in Star Trek: Picard .

Since Data was created in the image of his father, Dr. Noonien Soong, it only made sense to have the chameleon-like actor take a turn as the scientist in one of Data's best episodes , TNG season 4, episode 3, "Brothers." The trend continued when Data's ancestor, Dr. Arik Soong, was introduced in that Star Trek: Enterprise season 4 with Spiner returning for the prequel series. Star Trek: Picard not only allowed Spiner to reprise his role as Data, but it introduced Adam and Altan Inigo Soong , both of whom were from different time periods and offered conflicting views of the Soong family legacy.

How To Watch All Star Trek TV Shows In Timeline Order

6 dr. adam soong, star trek: picard.

Dr. Adam Soong was the earliest known Soong, and his encounters with Admiral Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) in 2024 Los Angeles were the subject of Star Trek: Picard season 2 . Dr. Soong was an eccentric and dangerous billionaire whose scientific obsession led him to the fields of human genetic engineering and augmentation. Adam created a series of cloned "daughters" through the process, though they all suffered from a deadly genetic defect. In the end, Soong's only surviving daughter, Kore Soong (Isa Briones), discovered the truth about her so-called father and destroyed all of his research.

In Star Trek: Picard season 2's dark alternate reality, Adam Soong was considered a hero by the Confederation of Planets.

The villainous Adam Soong made Data's backstory more interesting , as there were parallels between the struggles of each generation of Soong to perfect their designs. Although Adam was determined to find a cure for Kore's genetic defect, he was driven not by love for his cloned daughter, but rather by a desire to make a name for himself. Soong was so obsessed with his own legacy that he was willing to murder Renée Picard (Penelope Mitchell) to prevent her from making a discovery on the Europa Mission that would render Soong's research obsolete. Far from the mad genius of his successors, Dr. Adam Soong's murderous ways were just mad.

5 Dr. Arik Soong

Star trek: enterprise.

In the 22nd century, Dr. Arik Soong came across Captain Jonathan Archer (Scott Bakula) and the NX-01 Enterprise crew in Star Trek: Enterprise season 4, and Arik had taken up the twisted mantel of his ancestor, Adam Soong. Star Trek: Picard season 2 revealed that Dr. Adam Soong possessed a file entitled Project Khan, the genetic engineering protocol that led to the creation of Khan Noonien Singh (Ricardo Montalban) and his reign of terror. Dr. Arik Soong took the genetic research used to create Khan even further. After stealing genetically altered embryos from Khan's Eugenics War , Dr. Arik Soong raised the enhanced children only to have them violently rebel just like Khan did in Star Trek: The Original Series .

Arik Soong's misguided efforts eventually led to a genetic disaster within the Klingon race, as they used leftover Augment DNA in an attempt to create Klingon Augments.

Dr. Arik Soong tried to convince his Augment "children" not to kill anyone, but when they disobeyed him, he helped Captain Archer stop them. After the failure of his Augments, Arik Soong was taken back to prison, where he decided to shift his focus to the study of artificial life. This marked an important shift in the Soong dynasty, as their focus on artificial intelligence would eventually lead to Data and his brothers. Later, Arik Soong's protégés used his work to create Dal R'El (Brett Gray), a Human Augment hybrid, who did not discover his true history until the end of Star Trek: Prodigy season 1 .

4 Dr. Noonien Soong

Star trek: the next generation.

During the 24th century of Star Trek: The Next Generation , Dr. Noonien Soong's legacy was cemented when his creation, Lt. Commander Data, became a decorated Starfleet officer. A misunderstood genius, Noonien Soong created several androids while living on Omicron Theta, including Data, the prototype B-4, and Data's unstable precursor, Lore . While living among the colonists on Omicron Theta, Lore began to believe himself superior to humans and exhibited frightening behavior. Noonien Soong then deactivated Lore and designed better ethical subroutines for Data. Unbeknownst to Dr. Soong, Lore had communicated with the Crystalline Entity prior to his deactivation, and the Entity then attacked Omicron Theta.

Dr. Noonien Soong had none of the deadly intent of Dr. Adam Soong.

Dr. Noonien Soong was presumed dead in the attack, but he had managed to escape and continued his research elsewhere. In TNG's "Brothers," Soong activated a homing beacon in Data and revealed he had created an emotion chip for the android . Unfortunately, Lore also responded to the homing beacon and stole the chip meant for his brother, before fatally wounding his father. Dr. Soong was legitimately interested in creating artificial life and had ditched his family's previous obsession with genetic augmentation. Though his abandoning of his creations led to Frankenstein -like consequences when Lore murdered him, Dr. Noonien Soong had none of the deadly intent of Dr. Adam Soong.

3 Dr. Altan Inigo Soong

The 2385 attack on Mars was the inciting incident of Star Trek: Picard season 1, and the fallout from the attack led to the all-out ban of artificial lifeforms. Picard season 1 introduced Dr. Altan Inigo Soong, who was Dr. Noonien Soong's only biological child , and technically brother to Data, Lore, and B-4. Dr. Altan Soong's pursuits were closer to that of his father than his other ancestors, and he partnered with fellow cyberneticist Dr. Bruce Maddox (John Ales) to illegally pursue artificial life despite the ban. Soong and Maddox went on to build a laboratory and a community of androids on the planet Coppelius.

Bruce Maddox became convinced that someone within the Federation had been behind the attack on Mars, so he created the androids Soji and Dahj Asha (Isa Briones) to uncover the truth.

Altan Soong remained on Coppelius, looking after his android "children," and working on a means to transfer a person's consciousness into a synthetic body he called a golem. Although Soong originally meant for this synthetic form for himself, he later gifted the golem body to Jean-Luc Picard after Picard died of a terminal brain disease. Soong had also created artificial animals like Spot II and synthetic butterflies, proving he had more diverse interests than the other Soongs. After the ban on synthetics was lifted, Soong redirected his efforts to create a newly upgraded version of Data , that also incorporated the memories of Lore, B-4, and Data's daughter, Lal (Hallie Todd).

Data’s Evil Relatives: Every Soong’s Biggest Crimes In Star Trek

2 the soongs abandoned eugenics in favor of androids, later in life, arik soong chose to focus on artificial life rather than genetic engineering..

The changes in Klingon appearance were the result of Dr. Arik Soong's botched genetic augmentation during Enterprise , and his spectacular failures led him to shift his focus from genetics to synthetics before the end of his life. Arik understood that research into artificial life still had a long way to go and that it would take generations before there would be tangible results. From this point on, the Soongs worked in the field of cybernetics, hoping to create artificial life that was indistinguishable from organic life.

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds is the latest Star Trek series to explore the time period between Arik and Noonien, and it could provide more clues about the Soongs and their obsession with artificial life.

By all appearances, Dr. Noonien Soong had stronger morals than his ancestors and genuinely cared for Data and the other androids he created. Throughout Star Trek: The Next Generation , Data became the Soong family's greatest accomplishment, as he saved the USS Enterprise-D on numerous occasions and achieved his own level of humanity. Tragically, Data sacrificed himself to save his friends in Star Trek: Nemesis , but this was not the end of Noonien Soong's best creation.

1 Data In Star Trek: Picard Season 3 Is Soong's Greatest Success

Picard season 3 brought closure to data and the soongs' star trek story..

After his deaths in both Star Trek: Nemesis and Star Trek: Picard season 1, Data was officially resurrected in Picard season 3. During their quest to uncover the Changeling/Borg plot to destroy the Federation, Admiral Picard and his crew found what remained of Data being used for security on Daystrom Station . They quickly rescued their old friend, whose consciousness had been combined with those of Lore, B-4, and Lal . Although Lore's personality briefly took over the upgraded android body, Data became the dominant personality in the end.

By the end of Star Trek: Picard season 3, Data had become as close to human as possible.

With this new human-like synthetic body, not only could Data experience physical sensations, but he could also feel organic human emotions for the first time. When piloting the rebuilt Enterprise-D, for example, Data experienced joy that even Counselor Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis) could feel. Data reunited with his best friend, Commodore Geordi La Forge (LeVar Burton), and the rest of his old crew, bringing his Star Trek story to a satisfying conclusion. By the end of Star Trek: Picard season 3 , Data had become as close to human as possible, finally achieving his life-long dream and cementing himself as the Soongs' greatest success.

Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Enterprise & Star Trek: Picard are streaming on Paramount+.

Why Hasn't 'Star Trek: Legacy' Been Greenlit? CBS CEO Explains Paramount's Plans

CBS' CEO George Cheeks isn't ruling it out, but "it’s really about the cadence and the timeline of it."

The Big Picture

  • Star Trek: Picard spin-off of Legacy has not been greenlit yet.
  • CBS CEO George Cheeks confirms Star Trek is still a priority for Paramount.
  • Cheeks is not ruling out the possibility of a Legacy series but explains that it's all about timing.

Paramount+ has a number of Star Trek projects in the works, but the proposed Star Trek: Legacy spin-off of Picard has yet to get the green light — despite the wishes of fans and creatives. A new interview with CBS CEO George Cheeks sheds some light on the matter, suggesting that the go-ahead for any future Trek projects is all about timing. In a conversation with Vulture , when asked about an official go-ahead for Legacy and the future of Trek at the streamer, given the recent cancellation of Star Trek: Discovery and the reassignment of Star Trek: Prodigy to Netflix, Cheeks gave the following answer:

"Star Trek remains one of the most important franchises for Paramount Global, and Paramount+ specifically. There’s so much great opportunity with the franchise, and it’s really about the cadence and the timeline of it. We don’t want to offer up all these amazing premium drama series at once. We want to time it out appropriately. Luckily, we have this incredible partner in Alex Kurtzman , and we all work together to sort of manage long-range planning across many years, to figure out what’s the right cadence for dropping new Star Trek series. So there’s a lot we’re focused on, but it should not suggest to you [a scaling back]. There is a tremendous amount of focus and prioritizing of the Star Trek franchise."

There are currently more official Star Trek projects in the works than ever before. Two live-action series are in production; Star Trek: Strange New Worlds is currently filming its third season , and Star Trek: Starfleet Academy is in the pre-production stage. The fifth season of the animated Star Trek: Lower Decks is in the works , as is the first-ever Star Trek TV movie, Section 31 . Prodigy , although it is no longer available on Paramount, is currently completing post-production on its second season, which will be released on Netflix this year.

What Is 'Star Trek: Legacy'?

While much of Picard 's final season focused on reuniting the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation for one final adventure to save the Federation, the series also set up a potential "next Next Generation " of characters who could propel the franchise into the future.

The series ended with Seven of Nine ( Jeri Ryan ), a former Borg drone introduced in Star Trek: Voyager , being given command of the newly-rechristened USS Enterprise-G . Other crew members include Picard characters Raffi Musiker ( Michelle Hurd ), Jack Crusher ( Ed Speleers ), the son of Jean-Luc Picard and Beverly Crusher; and Geordi La Forge's daughter, Sidney LaForge ( Ashlei Sharpe Chestnut ). The series' final episode ended on a potential teaser, as the godlike Q ( John De Lancie ) appears before Crusher , telling him that his "trial," much like the one he subjected Picard to over the course of Next Generation 's seven seasons, had just begun.

Picard's third-season showrunner, Terry Matalas , has noted his eagerness to continue the story with a Legacy spin-off, as have members of the show's proposed cast . Fans, likewise, have responded with a letter-writing campaign to Paramount. Speleers is also confident that the series will happen if fans stay "noisy about it."

Star Trek: Legacy 's future at Paramount remains unclear. Stay tuned to Collider for future updates.

Star Trek: Picard

Follow-up series to Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002) that centers on Jean-Luc Picard in the next chapter of his life.

Watch on Paramount+

IMAGES

  1. Star Trek: The Next Generation (Kelvin Timeline) Cast : r/Fancast

    star trek next generation timeline

  2. The Definitive Chronological Viewing Order For The Star Trek Cinematic

    star trek next generation timeline

  3. Star Trek Timeline. Mit allen Punkten? (Star Trek: The Next Generation )

    star trek next generation timeline

  4. Official Timeline of Star Trek

    star trek next generation timeline

  5. Star Trek Releases Updated Official Timeline For Entire Franchise

    star trek next generation timeline

  6. Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series 1987–1994)

    star trek next generation timeline

COMMENTS

  1. Timeline of Star Trek

    In universe timeline chronological order Star Trek: Enterprise (ENT), Star Trek: The Original Series (TOS), Star Trek: The Animated Series (TAS), Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG), and all 13 of the Star Trek feature films, including the three newest J. J. Abrams "reboot" films, or "Kelvin Timeline" based on the original series. [citation ...

  2. The Complete Star Trek Timeline Explained

    Star Trek (2387/Kelvin Timeline 2233/Kelvin Timeline 2258) This one is tricky. Directed by JJ Abrams, Star Trek was framed as something of a reboot, but was in fact the beginning of an alternate reality story. In 2387, a star explodes and threatens to wipe out billions of people, including the entire planet of Romulus.

  3. Star Trek timeline in complete chronological order, explained

    The current main Star Trek timeline begins in the year 2151, with the first season of Enterprise, and concludes over a millennium later in 3190 with the upcoming Star Trek Discovery season 5. ... Star Trek: The Next Generation seasons 1-5 (Year set in: 2364-2369) Star Trek: Deep Space Nine seasons 1-2 (Year set in: 2369-2371)

  4. How to Watch Star Trek in Order: The Complete Series Timeline

    Learn how to watch Star Trek shows and movies in chronological or release order, from Enterprise to Discovery. Find out where to stream Star Trek on Paramount+, Hulu, or other platforms.

  5. Star Trek: The Next Generation

    Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) is an American science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry. It originally aired from September 28, 1987, to May 23, 1994, in syndication, spanning 178 episodes over seven seasons. ... This infographic shows the first-run production timeline of various Star Trek franchise shows and films ...

  6. Star Trek: The Next Generation

    Star Trek: The Next Generation, often abbreviated to TNG, is the second live-action Star Trek television series, and the first set in the 24th century. Like its predecessors, it was created by Gene Roddenberry. Produced at Paramount Pictures, it aired in first-run syndication, by Paramount Television in the US, from September 1987 to May 1994. The series was set in the 24th century and ...

  7. What is the chronological order for the Star Trek series?

    2364 to 2370: Star Trek: The Next Generation (ST:TNG) 2371 to 2371: Star Trek: Generations (bulk of the movie except prologue) 2373 to 2373: First Contact. 2375 to 2375: Insurrection. 2369 to 2375: Star Trek: Deep Space 9 (ST: DS9) Partially overlaps with TNG, Generations and 2 TNG movies. Season 1 is same time as TNG season 6.

  8. TNG :: TrekCore

    Explore the chronological order of events in Star Trek: The Next Generation, the second series in the Star Trek franchise. The timeline covers the pre-Next Generation, seven seasons of the show, and the post-Next Generation periods from 2300 to the far future.

  9. List of Star Trek: The Next Generation episodes

    Star Trek: The Next Generation is an American science fiction television series which aired in syndication from September 1987 through May 1994. It is the second live-action series of the Star Trek franchise and comprises a total of 176 (DVD and original broadcast) or 178 (syndicated) episodes over 7 seasons. The series picks up about 95 years after the original series is said to have taken place.

  10. How Picard Fits Into the Star Trek Timeline

    I t's been 26 long years since Star Trek: The Next Generation graced the small screen. But beginning Jan. 23, a new series centered around that show's captain, Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart ...

  11. Star Trek timeline: Boldly go on a chronological journey through the

    1893 - The time-travelling crew of the USS Enterprise-D encounters The Adventures of Tom Sawyer author Mark Twain in San Francisco. (Time's Arrow, Star Trek: The Next Generation) 1930 - Having ...

  12. 'Star Trek' Timeline, Explained

    How to watch the Star Trek prime timeline in chronological order. ... Star Trek: The Next Generation (stardates: 2364 - 2370) Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (stardates: 2369 -2375)

  13. Star Trek Timeline Explained: From The Original Series to Picard

    Star Trek: The Next Generation Season 6 (1992-1993) Star Trek: Deep Space ... Star Trek; Timeline; About The Author. Liz Shannon Miller (467 Articles Published) Liz Shannon Miller is a Los Angeles ...

  14. Star Trek Movie & TV Timeline: Original Series, Kelvin, & Discovery

    Over the years, Star Trek has offered its own answers to the origins of the universe and indeed life on Earth itself. According to Star Trek: The Next Generation, humanoid life evolved on a single distant world, and was seeded across the galaxy; this neatly explains the "coincidence" that most of the races in the Alpha Quadrant are humanoid. The Star Trek timeline differentiates from the real ...

  15. How to watch Star Trek in order

    Star Trek: The Next Generation (TNG) Star Trek: Generations; Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (DS9) ... which visits various periods on the franchise timeline. Anything listed as a Short Trek is a ...

  16. Star Trek Updated Official Timeline Revealed

    Star Trek: Nemesis, the final Next Generation film, occurs in 2379. Star Trek: Lower Decks begins in 2380, and Star Trek: Picard continues Jean-Luc Picard's story in the year 2399.

  17. The Star Trek: TNG Movie Timeline Explained

    Learn how the four films of the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" series fit into the overall "Star Trek" timeline and explore the themes of time, technology, and mortality. The films feature the crew of the Enterprise led by Jean-Luc Picard and their encounters with the Borg, the Nexus, the Son'a, and Shinzon.

  18. Star Trek Timeline Explained

    read more - The Best Star Trek: The Next Generation Episodes. 2368 - Sarek dies (TNG 5×01 - "Unification") 2369-2375: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Things get confusing as TV shows begin ...

  19. Official Star Trek Timeline Revealed

    Watch a video that chronicles the Star Trek universe from the Big Bang to the destruction of Romulus in 2387. See the milestones and overlaps of all seven Star Trek TV series and 13 movies, including Star Trek: The Next Generation.

  20. Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series 1987-1994)

    Recently viewed. Star Trek: The Next Generation: Created by Gene Roddenberry. With Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Marina Sirtis. Set almost 100 years after Captain Kirk's 5-year mission, a new generation of Starfleet officers sets off in the U.S.S. Enterprise-D on its own mission to go where no one has gone before.

  21. Guinan's Complete TNG & Picard Timeline Explained

    Star Trek: The Next Generation's Guinan, the Enterprise-D's mysterious bartender, is one of the most enduring characters from the series with a story that spans multiple centuries.Played by Academy Award winner Whoopi Goldberg, Guinan was introduced in TNG season 2. Guinan is an El-Aurian, a race of empathic and telepathic beings who are extremely long-lived; Guinan's exact age is never ...

  22. A Complete Timeline of the Borg in Star Trek

    Throughout the six-decade history of Star Trek, there have been many iconic villains, but perhaps none more so than the Borg.Created by Maurice Hurley, the head writer for Star Trek: The Next Generation Season 2, the Borg began as an organic species looking attain perfection. They achieved this by merging their organic bodies with cybernetic components.

  23. Star Trek movies in chronological order

    2. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. (Image credit: Paramount Pictures) Release date: June 4, 1982. Cast: William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, Ricardo Montalban. Ask a Star Trek fan what the best Star ...

  24. Star Trek Can Revisit the Kelvin Timeline Through the Next Generation

    One thing the Kelvin Timeline has in common with The Next Generation crew is neither group's final film was supposed to be their last movie.Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country was the perfect send-off for the original Kirk, Spock and company. Yet, both Beyond and Star Trek: Nemesis served as appropriate finales for the characters.Luckily, the USS Enterprise-D crew had Star Trek: Picard ...

  25. 5 Controversial Star Trek: The Next Generation Scenes Nobody ...

    The only clip show episode in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" — the finale of Season 2, "Shades of Gray" — is widely considered one of the series' worst episodes.

  26. Star Trek: The Next Generation Almost Wiped Out All Vulcans

    Most Star Trek fans are familiar with The Next Generation episode "Yesterday's Enterprise:" it featured the Enterprise-C traveling forward in time and changing history for the worse, leaving ...

  27. Every Soong Character Brent Spiner Plays In Star Trek

    Most remembered for his turn as Lt. Commander Data on Star Trek: The Next Generation, Brent Spiner also went on to play every single Soong character that has been introduced in the Star Trek universe. Starting with Data's creator, Dr. Noonien Soong on TNG, the celebrated character actor has been tapped to play different Soongs throughout Trek's extended timeline.

  28. Why Hasn't 'Star Trek: Legacy' Been Greenlit? CBS CEO Explains

    Follow-up series to Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002) that centers on Jean-Luc Picard in the next chapter of his life. Release Date January 23, 2020