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US recommends Americans reconsider traveling to China due to arbitrary law enforcement and exit bans

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Travelers walk along a concourse at Beijing West Railway Station in Beijing, Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2023. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

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BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. recommended Americans reconsider traveling to China because of arbitrary law enforcement and exit bans and the risk of wrongful detentions.

No specific cases were cited, but the advisory came after a 78-year-old U.S. citizen was sentenced to life in prison on spying charges in May.

It also followed the passage last week of a sweeping Foreign Relations Law that threatens countermeasures against those seen as harming China’s interests.

China also recently passed a broadly written counterespionage law that has sent a chill through the foreign business community, with offices being raided, as well as a law to sanction foreign critics.

“The People’s Republic of China (PRC) government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including issuing exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries, without fair and transparent process under the law,” the U.S. advisory said.

“U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime,” it warned.

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The advisory also said that Chinese authorities “appear to have broad discretion to deem a wide range of documents, data, statistics, or materials as state secrets and to detain and prosecute foreign nationals for alleged espionage.”

It listed a wide range of potential offenses from taking part in demonstrations to sending electronic messages critical of Chinese policies or even simply conducting research into areas deemed sensitive.

Exit bans could be used to compel individuals to participate in Chinese government investigations, pressure family members to return from abroad, resolve civil disputes in favor of Chinese citizens and “gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments,” the advisory said.

Similar advisories were issued for the semi-autonomous Chinese regions of Hong Kong and Macao. They were dated Friday and emailed to journalists on Monday.

The U.S. had issued similar advisories to its citizens in the past, but those in recent years had mainly warned of the dangers of being caught in strict and lengthy lockdowns while China closed its borders for three years under its draconian “zero-COVID” policy.

China generally responds angrily to what it considers U.S. efforts to impugn its authoritarian Communist Party-led system. It has issued its own travel advisories concerning the U.S., warning of the dangers of crime, anti-Asian discrimination and the high cost of emergency medical assistance.

China had no immediate response to the travel advisory on Monday.

Details of the accusations against the accused spy John Shing-Wan Leung are not available, given China’s authoritarian political system and the ruling Communist Party’s absolute control over legal matters. Leung, who also holds permanent residency in Hong Kong, was detained in the southeastern city of Suzhou on April 15, 2021 — a time when China had closed its borders and tightly restricted movement of people domestically to control the spread of COVID-19.

The warnings come as U.S.-China relations are at their lowest in years , over trade, technology, Taiwan and human rights, although the sides are taking some steps to improve the situation. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken made a long-delayed visit to Beijing last week and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen is making a much-anticipated trip to Beijing this week. China also recently appointed a new ambassador to Washington, who presented his credentials in a meeting with President Joe Biden at the White House.

Other incidents, however, have also pointed to the testiness in the relationship. China formally protested last month after Biden called Chinese leader Xi Jinping a “dictator,” days after Blinken’s visit.

Biden brushed off the protest, saying his words would have no negative impact on U.S.-China relations and that he still expects to meet with Xi sometime soon. Biden has also drawn rebukes from Beijing by explicitly saying the U.S. would defend self-governing Taiwan if China, which claims the island as its own territory, were to attack it.

Biden said his blunt statements regarding China are “just not something I’m going to change very much.”

The administration is also under pressure from both parties to take a tough line on China, making it one of the few issues on which most Democrats and Republicans agree.

Along with several detained Americans, Two Chinese-Australians, Cheng Lei, who formerly worked for China’s state broadcaster, and writer Yang Jun, have been held since 2020 and 2019 respectively without word on their sentencing.

Perhaps the most notorious case of arbitrary detention involved two Canadians, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, who were detained in China in 2018, shortly after Canada arrested Meng Wanzhou, Huawei Technologies’ chief financial officer and the daughter of the tech powerhouse’s founder, on a U.S. extradition request.

They were charged with national security crimes that were never explained and released three years later after the U.S. settled fraud charges against Meng. Many countries labeled China’s action “hostage politics.”

us travel warnings to china

Security Alert May 17, 2024

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Travel Advisory April 12, 2024

Mainland china, hong kong & macau - see summaries.

Updated due to new national security legislation in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

Summary:  Reconsider travel to Mainland China due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws, including in relation to exit bans, and the risk of wrongful detentions.

Exercise increased caution when traveling to the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws .

Reconsider travel to the Macau Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to a limited ability to provide emergency consular services . Exercise increased caution when traveling to the Macau SAR due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws .

See specific risks and conditions in each jurisdiction . 

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Recommend consult with travel clinic

Max RMB 20,000

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Beijing No. 55 An Jia Lou Road Chaoyang District, Beijing 100600 Telephone: +86 10-8531-4000 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +86 10-8531-4000 Fax: +86 10-8531-3300 Email: [email protected] This consular district includes Beijing, Tianjin, Gansu, Hebei, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Xinjiang, Chongqing, Sichuan, and Tibet.

U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong & Macau 26 Garden Road Central, Hong Kong Telephone:  +852 2841-2211, +852 2841-2225, +852 2841-2323   Emergency After-Hours Telephone:  +852 2523-9011   Fax:  +852 2845-4845 Email:   [email protected]   This consular district includes the Hong Kong and Macau Special Administrative Regions (SARs).

U.S. Consulate General Guangzhou No. 43 Hua Jiu Road Zhujiang New Town Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510623 Telephone: +86 20-3814-5775 Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +86 10-8531-4000 Fax: +86 20-3814-5572 Email:   [email protected]  This consular district includes Yunnan, Guizhou, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, and Hainan.

U.S. Consulate General Shanghai No. 1469 Huai Hai Zhong Road Xuhui District, Shanghai 200041 Telephone: +86 21-8011-2400  Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +86 10-8531-4000  Fax: +86 21-6148-8266  Email:   [email protected]  This consular district includes Shanghai, Anhui, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang.

U.S. Consulate General Shenyang No. 52 14th Wei Road Heping District, Shenyang 110003 Telephone: +86 24-2322-1198  Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +86 10-8531-4000 Fax: +86 24-8610-6904  Email:  [email protected]  This consular district includes Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang, Jilin, and Liaoning.

U.S. Consulate General Wuhan No. 396 Xin Hua Road Wuhan Minsheng Bank Building Jianghan District, Wuhan 430015 Telephone: +86 27-8563 2800  Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +86 10-8531-4000  Fax:  +86 27-5949 6496 Email:  [email protected] This consular district includes Henan, Hubei, Hunan, and Jiangxi.

Destination Description

See the U.S. Department of State’s Fact Sheet on the People's Republic of China for information on U.S.-China relations. 

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Entry & Exit:

  • Obtain a visa prior to arrival in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and have a passport with at least six months' validity remaining. The lack of either will result in a fine and immediate deportation upon arrival.
  • Apply for a ten-year multiple entry visa, useful for repeated travel, or trips to the Hong Kong or Macau Special Administrative Regions (SARs) with returns to mainland China.
  • If you plan to work in the PRC, be sure to obtain the correct visa. Working in the PRC is not permissible on a student or tourist visa, and may result in detention, criminal charges, imprisonment, and deportation.
  • You must have a valid visa to exit the PRC and you must leave the PRC before the expiration of the listed duration of stay.
  • Do not travel to the PRC if you have a warrant for your arrest in the United States.

Lack of a visa, having an expired visa, or overstaying your visa will result in detention and/or fines.

  • Apply for a visa extension from the local  Entry-Exit Bureau  before attempting to leave the PRC. Do not expect your request to be expedited, so apply ahead of time.
  • Staying in the PRC on an expired visa may lead to a fine, imprisonment, and deportation.
  • Visit the website of the  Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States of America  for current visa information as well as information on the PRC’s immigration and nationality laws.

The Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR): The TAR requires special permits for tourist travel, most often obtained through a travel agent in the PRC. If you do enter a restricted area without the requisite permit, you could be fined, taken into custody, and deported for illegal entry. To learn more about specific entry requirements for the TAR or other restricted areas, check with the  Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States of America . The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of the PRC. Transiting the PRC:

  • When transiting certain international airports, you may stay in mainland China without a PRC visa. However, this “visa-free travel” permit is only valid for the city of arrival and does not allow you to visit other cities in the PRC.
  • The duration of allowed stay and how broadly you may travel varies by region.
  • Transiting without a visa requires a valid passport with at least six months of remaining validity, a visa for your onward destination (if necessary), and an onward ticket from the same location.
  • You must inform your airline upon check-in and get an endorsement stamp at the immigration desk before leaving the airport.
  • Consult the  Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States of America  for a current list of eligible airports and more detailed guidance.
  • PRC border officials have the authority to deny foreign travelers’ entry to the PRC without warning or explanation. The U.S. Embassy and Consulates General cannot intervene on your behalf if denied entry to the PRC.

During Your Stay: 

  • Failure to register your stay within 24 hours of arrival in the PRC could result in fines and deportation. You can register with hotel staff or the local police station. 
  • Local regulations require foreigners to carry valid passports and PRC visas or residence permits at all times.
  • Entry and exit requirements are strictly enforced, as are restrictions on activities allowed by any particular visa class.
  • Police, school administrators, transportation officials, and hotel staff may check your visa to make sure you have not overstayed. If you overstay your visa’s duration of stay, you may be denied service by hotels, airports, and train stations, as well as face fines and detention.
  • If you encounter problems in the Tibet Autonomous Region, the U.S. government has limited ability to provide assistance because the PRC government does not usually authorize U.S. government personnel to travel there, even to provide consular assistance to U.S. citizens.

Dual Nationality: The PRC government does not recognize dual nationality.  If you are a dual national of the United States and the PRC, or otherwise have ethnic or historical ties to the PRC, it is possible that PRC authorities will assert that you are a PRC citizen, limit your ability to access certain consular services, and, if you are detained, deny your access to U.S. consular officials. Because the PRC government does not recognize dual citizenship, dual U.S.-PRC citizens may face a number of hurdles when seeking public benefits in the PRC. U.S. citizens who are also citizens of the PRC may experience difficulty in accessing benefits in the PRC, such as enrollment in public schools, treatment at public hospitals and clinics, or obtaining PRC identity and citizenship documents, such as passports. U.S.-PRC dual citizens must navigate conflicting aspects of PRC nationality, which the PRC government may inconsistently apply.

If you are a naturalized U.S. citizen or have a possible claim to PRC citizenship, and you are traveling to the PRC, inform yourself about PRC nationality law and practices relating to determination and loss of PRC citizenship. PRC authorities generally consider a child born in the PRC to at least one PRC-national parent to be a PRC citizen, even if the child was issued a U.S. passport at the time of birth. If you have or had a claim to PRC citizenship and your child is born in the PRC, prior to departing the PRC with your child, you may wish to contact the local Public Security Bureau and/or Entry-Exit Bureau for information on obtaining a travel document. If you have or had a claim to PRC citizenship and your child is born in the United States, please contact the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States of America for specific information on the documentation requirements to bring your child to the PRC.

Find information on  dual nationality ,  prevention of international child abduction , and  customs regulations  on our websites.

Safety and Security

For most visitors, the PRC remains a very safe country. Traffic accidents are the most common safety concern for U.S. citizens. Training, capability, and responsiveness of PRC authorities vary by region and even by city. The U.S. Embassy and Consulates General have no law enforcement authority and may not represent U.S. citizens in either criminal or civil legal matters.

To ensure your safety and security in the PRC, you should:

  • Take routine safety precautions.
  • Pay attention to surroundings.
  • Report any concerns to the local police.
  • Call “110,”  the local equivalent to “911”. English services are often available, but you should not expect English services in remote parts of the PRC.

Violent crime is not common in the PRC, however:

  • While sanctioned demonstrations must be approved by PRC authorities, they can turn violent.
  • Domestic unrest and terrorism can occur.
  • Business disputes between U.S. citizens and PRC-national business partners can sometimes result in physical confrontation, detainment, or coercion. Go straight to the police if you feel threatened or relocate to a public place.

Be alert to criminal schemes, such as:

  • “Tourist Tea” Scams: PRC nationals invite visitors out to tea and leave them with an exorbitant bill.
  • Phone Scams:  Callers pose as police officers and request a funds transfer to resolve an identity theft or money laundering investigation. In these cases, DO NOT WIRE any money. If you receive any suspicious calls or requests, contact the local Public Security Bureau to verify the caller’s identity.
  • “Unlicensed or Unapproved Cabs”:  Taxi and ridesharing services in China are generally licensed by authorities. Be cautious when using taxi or ridesharing services that are not accessible through mobile applications. If you use the locally approved taxi service, insist that the driver use the meter, and get a receipt. Have the name of your destination written in Chinese characters and ask the driver to remove the bags from the trunk before you get out of the taxi and before you pay.
  • Counterfeit Currency:  Although counterfeit currency has been a concern in the PRC the past, making purchases in cash is increasingly less common as most vendors prefer payments through local mobile payment apps. When you need cash, use only ATMs at trusted financial institutions, and carry a variety of denominations as vendors may have limited cash on hand as change.

Be alert to criminal schemes, such as internet, phone scams, dating scams, as well as financial scams. If you already have been victim of a scam, catalogue as many details as possible, including names, telephone and bank numbers, and email and IP addresses; file a police report, and inform the U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General. See the  U.S. Department of State's  and the  U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)'s  pages for information on scams. Victims of Crime:  Report crimes to the local police and contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest Consulate General. U.S. citizen victims of sexual assault can contact the local police and should contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime. See our webpage on  help for U.S. victims of crime overseas .

We can: 

  • Help you find appropriate medical care.
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police.
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent.
  • Provide general information regarding the victim’s role during the local investigation and following its conclusion.
  • Provide a list of local attorneys.
  • Provide our information on  victim’s compensation programs in the United States .
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution.
  • Help you find accommodation and arrange flights home.
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport.

Lost or Stolen Passports:  If your passport is stolen, you must apply for both a new passport at the U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General and a new PRC visa. File a police report at the nearest police station right away. You may also be directed to file a report at the local Exit-Entry Bureau .

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General for assistance. Domestic violence in the PRC is rarely recognized as a crime.

Tourism:  The tourism industry is unevenly regulated, and safety inspections for equipment and facilities do not commonly occur. Hazardous areas/activities are not always identified with appropriate signage, and staff may not be trained or certified either by the PRC government or by recognized authorities in the field. In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is typically available only in/near major cities. First responders are generally unable to access areas outside of major cities to provide urgent medical treatment. U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance . 

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:   You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.

Some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. See  crimes against minors abroad  and the U.S. Department of Justice  website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General immediately.

  • PRC authorities must notify a U.S. consular officer within four days; however, this does not always occur in a timely manner.
  • A consular officer may be the only authorized visitor during your initial detention period.
  • Bail is rarely granted.
  • Detention may last many months before a trial.
  • The U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General is unable to represent you in a legal matter.
  • Travelers to the PRC should enroll in the State Department’s  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  and you may wish to have someone contact the U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General if you are detained.
  • Please see the section on DUAL NATIONALITY for the limits on consular notification and access to dual nationals.
  • See U.S. Department of State’s  webpage  for further information.

The PRC legal system can be opaque and the interpretation and enforcement of local laws arbitrary. The judiciary does not enjoy independence from political influence. U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC should be aware of varying levels of scrutiny to which they will be subject from local law enforcement and state security. 

Certain provisions of the Criminal Law of the People’s Republic of China, such as “social order” crimes (Article 293) and crimes involving “endangering state security” and “state secrets” (Article 102 to 113), are ill-defined and can be interpreted by the authorities arbitrarily and situationally. Information that may be common knowledge in other countries could be considered a “state secret” in the PRC, and information can be designated a “state secret” retroactively. Drug and Alcohol Enforcement:

PRC law-enforcement authorities have little tolerance for illegal drugs, including marijuana. Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking illegal drugs in the PRC are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences, heavy fines, or the death penalty. Police regularly conduct unannounced drug tests on people suspected of drug use and have been known to enter a bar or nightclub and subject all patrons to immediate drug testing. Police may force you to provide a urine, blood, or hair follicle sample on short notice. A positive finding, even if the drug was legal elsewhere or consumed prior to arriving in the PRC, can lead to immediate detention, fines, deportation, and/or a ban from re-entering the PRC.

The PRC also has strict laws against driving under the influence of alcohol that can lead to immediate detention on a criminal charge.

Assisted Reproductive Technology:  In vitro fertilization (IVF) is widely and legally practiced. PRC law, however, strictly forbids surrogacy, and surrogacy contracts will not be considered valid. The use of reproductive technology for medical research and profit is strictly controlled. Contracts and Commercial Disputes:  Before entering into a commercial or employment contract in the PRC, have it reviewed by legal counsel both in the United States and in the PRC. The  U.S. International Trade Administration  can assist you in identifying and vetting business contacts and opportunities but may not intervene in contract disputes. Many U.S. citizens have reported difficulty getting their contracts enforced by PRC courts or being forced out of profitable joint-ventures without opportunity to secure legal recourse in the PRC. Counterfeit Goods:  Do not buy counterfeit or pirated goods. Bootlegs are illegal in the United States, and you may also be breaking local law by purchasing them.

Cruise Ship Passengers:  Click here for  safety information and travel advice .

Digital Payments: The PRC has transitioned to almost a predominantly cashless society. Some mobile phone applications offer a digital payment solution for individuals visiting the PRC on a temporary or long-term basis. Often, payment is made through an individual using their mobile phone to scan a vendor or business’s QR code. The number of locations accepting foreign credit cards has decreased in recent years. Visitors to the PRC should research whether the locations they are visiting will accept foreign credit cards and familiarize themselves with mobile digital payment options prior to traveling to the PRC.

Earthquakes:  Earthquakes occur throughout the PRC. Check here for information about preparing for a crisis or disaster overseas.

English/Secondary School Teachers:  English teachers in the PRC frequently report employment disputes which can result in questioning by local authorities, termination, lost wages, confiscation of passports, forced eviction from housing, and even threats of violence.

Exit Bans:  Business disputes, court orders to pay a settlement, or government investigations into both criminal and civil issues may result in an exit ban which will prohibit your departure from the PRC until the issue is resolved. Even individuals and their family members who are not directly involved, or even aware of these proceedings, can be subject to an exit ban. Additionally, some local businesspeople who feel that they have been wronged by a foreign business partner may hire "debt collectors” to harass, intimidate, and sometimes physically detain foreign business partners or family members in hopes of collecting the debt. The U.S. Embassy or nearest U.S. Consulate General can provide a list of local attorneys who serve U.S. clients but are otherwise unable to intervene in civil cases. Local law enforcement authorities are generally unwilling to become involved in what they consider private business matters and may not provide the individual who has been barred from leaving the PRC with any written notice of the exit ban.

Faith-Based Travelers:   See our following webpages for details:

  • Faith-Based Travel Information
  • International Religious Freedom Reports
  • Country Reports on Human Rights Practices
  • Hajj Fact Sheet for Travelers
  • Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

LGBTQI+ Travelers:  Same sex marriages are not legally recognized in the PRC and local authorities will not provide marriage certificates to same-sex couples. There are no civil rights laws that prohibit discrimination or harassment based on sexual orientation or gender identity, though homosexuality has been decriminalized. Prejudices and discrimination still exist in many parts of the country. There are growing LGBTQI+ communities in some of the largest cities in the PRC and violence against LGBTQI+ individuals in the PRC is relatively rare. See  Section 6 of our Human Rights Practices in the Human Rights Report for the People's Republic of China  and read our  LGBTQI+ Travel Information page .

Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs):  In January 2017, the PRC implemented a law regulating the operations of foreign NGOs in the PRC. NGOs and their employees should ensure they are complying with all relevant statutory requirements, particularly if working in sensitive areas or fields. Additionally, the PRC government announced sanctions on five U.S.-based NGOs in December 2019.

North Korea:  Do not travel to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) due to the serious risk of arrest and long-term detention of U.S. nationals. For further information, consult the  North Korea International Travel Information page  and the  North Korea Travel Advisory .

Political and Religious Activity:  Participating in unauthorized political or religious activities, including participating in public protests or sending private electronic messages critical of the government   may result in detention and PRC government-imposed restrictions on future travel to the PRC. Although the PRC constitution permits freedom of religious belief, it does not permit freedom of religious practice and government officials are increasing pressure on domestic religious activities. The U.S. Mission to the PRC has observed an increase in the number of U.S. citizens being interrogated, detained, and/or forced to leave the country in connection with real or perceived religious proselytization. U.S. citizens have been detained and/or expelled for distributing religious literature, including Bibles, or engaging in unauthorized religious meetings. If you bring religious literature with you, local law dictates that it be a “reasonable amount” for your personal use. If you attempt to bring larger quantities, the literature will likely be confiscated and you may be fined, detained, or deported. Social Insurance:  The PRC has a social insurance system to which foreigners who work in the PRC must contribute. When you sign an employment contract, you must apply for a social insurance number, and it is important that your employer work with you to comply with the regulations. Please check the official website for updated information. Social Media:  Social media accounts are widely monitored in the PRC. Local authorities may use information they deem critical, controversial, or that might involve illegal activity against both the poster of the material and the host of the social media forum under local law. Individuals have also been held responsible for the content that others place within social media spaces they control, such as the comments section under a post or within a group chat that an individual controls.

Special Scrutiny of Foreign Citizens:  On occasion, U.S. citizens visiting or resident in the PRC have been interrogated or detained for reasons said to be related to “state security.” In such circumstances, you could face arrest, detention, or an exit ban prohibiting your departure from the PRC for a prolonged period. Dual U.S.-PRC nationals and U.S. citizens of Chinese heritage may be at a higher risk of facing such special scrutiny. Information about  dual nationality  can be found on our website. Students: See our  U.S. Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Surveillance and Monitoring:  Security personnel carefully watch foreign visitors and may place you under surveillance. Hotel rooms (including meeting rooms), offices, cars, taxis, telephones, internet usage, ​digital payments, and fax machines may be monitored onsite or remotely, and personal possessions in hotel rooms, including computers, may be searched without your consent or knowledge. Security personnel have been known to detain and deport U.S. citizens sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC government. Transferring Money to/from the PRC:  The regulatory environment in the PRC includes tightening capital outflow controls that can severely impact one’s ability to move money out of the country. Wire transfers may only be available to those who have an active bank account in the PRC. Ask your local bank location in the PRC for more information. The U.S. Department of State may be able to help transfer funds to a destitute U.S citizen overseas through our office in Washington, D.C., to a U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate General abroad. More information on this option is available  here .

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  U.S. citizens with mobility disabilities may face challenges while traveling in the PRC. Sidewalks often do not have curb cuts and many streets can be crossed only via pedestrian bridges or underpasses accessible by staircase. Assistive technologies for blind people and those with other vision disabilities are unreliable, and access to elevators in public buildings can be restricted. In major cities, public restrooms in places visited by tourists usually have a least one accessible toilet. See  Persons with Disabilities in the Human Rights Report for the People's Republic of China (2022) .

Typhoons:  The southeast coast of the PRC is subject to strong typhoons and tropical storms, usually from July through September. For current information, please consult the Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Honolulu  and the  National Weather Service's Central Pacific Hurricane Center . Women Travelers: If you are a woman traveling abroad, please review our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region:  Extraordinary security measures are in place through the region. Authorities may impose curfews and restrictions on short notice. They may also engage in invasive surveillance techniques against individuals. Expect significant travel delays, avoid gatherings and demonstrations, always carry ID, and follow the instructions of local authorities. Travelers with ethnic ties to the region may experience special restrictions, discrimination, and even arbitrary detention.

COVID-19 Entry Requirements: There are no COVID-related entry requirements in place for U.S. citizens.

  • As of August 30, 2023, a negative COVID-19 PCR test or rapid antigen test is no longer required for entry. For more information, please see this notice .
  • No proof of vaccination against COVID-19 is required for entry.
  • There is no quarantine period for travelers upon arrival.

COVID-19 Testing: U.S. citizens can obtain a COVID-19 test at most hospitals and clinics in the PRC. They can choose between PCR and antigen tests, which are both available. The cost of the test is about $17 U.S. dollars, but it may vary depending on the location. The test fee is not covered by the host government and must be paid by the U.S. citizen. Test results are usually returned within 12 to 24 hours by email, text, or an update to the local COVID-19 monitoring app. For more information, please see this notice .

COVID-19 Vaccines:  Certain COVID-19 vaccines are available for U.S. citizens to receive in the PRC.

  • The PRC government has conditionally authorized several vaccines that are currently available to foreigners residing in the PRC. The two most commonly available, Sinopharm and Sinovac, have not yet received approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States. Sinopharm and Sinovac have received approval for emergency use by the World Health Organization (WHO). Please contact your local health authorities for more information.
  • Visit the FDA's website to  learn more about FDA-approved vaccines  in the United States.

Quality of Care:  The standards of medical care in the PRC are not equivalent to those in the United States. Even in private hospitals or public hospitals with well-equipped wards, English-speaking patients frequently encounter difficulty due to cultural, language, and regulatory differences. Rural areas have rudimentary facilities and inadequate staffing. Additionally, Rh-negative blood may be difficult to obtain; the blood type of the general Asian populace is Rh positive. Payment and Insurance:  Ambulances in the PRC are often slow to arrive, and most do not have sophisticated medical equipment or trained responders. Cash payment for services is often required prior to treatment, including emergency cases. Travelers will be asked to post a deposit prior to admission to cover the expected cost of treatment. Hospitals in major cities may accept credit cards. The U.S. Embassy and Consulates General in the PRC maintain lists of local  English-speaking doctors and hospitals . Use of Medicare/Medicaid in the PRC:  Be aware that U.S. Medicare/Medicaid does not apply overseas. Hospitals and doctors in the PRC often do not accept U.S. health insurance.

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance coverage overseas. Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for more information on type of insurance you should consider before you travel overseas.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Medication:  If traveling with prescription medication, check with the  Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States of America  to ensure the medication is legal in the PRC. Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with the prescription. Many commonly used U.S. drugs and medications are not available in the PRC, and counterfeit, low-quality knockoffs are prevalent. If you try to have medications sent to you from outside the PRC, you may have problems getting them released by PRC Customs authorities and/or you may have to pay high customs duties. Air Quality:  Air pollution is a significant problem in many locations. Visit AirNow Department of State for information on air quality at U.S. Embassies and Consulates. The PRC’s  Ministry of Ecology and Environment  also provides its own air quality data for cities throughout the PRC. Most roads and towns in Tibet, Qinghai, parts of Xinjiang, and western Sichuan are situated at altitudes over 10,000 feet. Take appropriate precautions to prepare for and be alert to altitude sickness. Disease:  The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Tuberculosis
  • Sexually transmitted infections (e.g., syphilis)

Vaccinations: Be up to date on all routine vaccinations recommended by the CDC. The CDC traveler’s health site for the PRC provides vaccine recommendations specific to travel within the PRC.

For further health information :

  • World Health Organization (WHO)
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Traffic safety is generally poor, and driving can be dangerous, though rules, regulations, and conditions vary greatly throughout the PRC.

Traffic can be chaotic and largely unregulated and the rate of accidents, including fatal accidents, is among the highest in the world. Motorcycle and bicycle accidents are frequent and often deadly. Pedestrians do not have the right of way, and you should show extreme caution when walking in traffic, even in marked crosswalks. Child safety seats are not widely available.

Traffic Laws:

  • You may not drive in the PRC using a U.S. or international driver’s license.
  • You can apply for a PRC driver’s license if you have a resident permit.
  • If you are involved in a traffic accident, stay calm and call and wait for the police.
  • If there are no injuries and damage is minimal, the parties often come to agreement on the spot.
  • Unresolved disputes are handled by the courts.
  • In cases involving injuries, the driver determined at fault is responsible for the injured person’s medical costs. Sometimes, the police may hold your passport until the other parties are satisfied with the compensation they receive.

Please refer to our  Road Safety page  for more information. Also, please review the Law of the People's Republic of China on Road Traffic Safety .

Public Transportation:  Public transportation, including subways, trains, and buses, generally has a positive safety record and is widely available in major cities, although individuals on crowded buses and subways can be targeted by pickpockets. Aviation Safety Oversight:   The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the PRC government’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of the PRC’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the  FAA’s Safety Assessment Page .

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to the PRC should check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Maritime Security Communications with Industry (MSCI) web portal. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard Homeport website , and the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) Navigational Warnings website .

The Commandant of the Coast Guard is unable to determine if effective anti-terrorism measures are in place in PRC ports as required by 46 U.S. Code § 70108.

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in  China . For additional IPCA-related information, please see the  International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA )  report.

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U.S. Issues Travel Warning for China, Hong Kong — What to Know

The State Department designated both mainland China and Macau as “Level 3,” recommending travelers “reconsider travel” there. Hong Kong was classified as a “Level 2.”

us travel warnings to china

WANG ZHAO/Getty Images

The U.S. Department of State re-issued a travel warning against heading to China, including Hong Kong and Macau, due to the possibility of being wrongfully detained and the arbitrary enforcement of laws.

The State Department designated both mainland China and Macau as “Level 3,” recommending travelers “reconsider travel” there. Hong Kong was classified as a “Level 2” city, recommending travelers “exercise increased caution” when going.

“The People’s Republic of China (PRC) government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including issuing exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries, without fair and transparent process under the law,” the department wrote in its advisory, adding “PRC authorities appear to have broad discretion to deem a wide range of documents, data, statistics, or materials as state secrets and to detain and prosecute foreign nationals for alleged espionage.”

In Hong Kong, the department warned China has “demonstrated an intent” to use a 2020 national security law “to target a broad range of activities such as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign entities.”

The renewed warning comes months after China resumed issuing international tourist visas following some of the strictest COVID-19-related restrictions in the world. For its part, Hong Kong started easing travel restrictions last year and no longer requires visitors undergo any COVID-19 testing or quarantine measures.

The State Department regularly updates its travel advisories for countries all over the world, assessing the security and health situations in each country and adjusting the classification accordingly on a scale of one (which indicates travelers should exercise normal precautions) to four (which warns Americans not to travel there). Recently, the department issued similar travel warnings for both Colombia and Jamaica .

In general, the State Department recommends American travelers enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program to receive alerts “and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.”

Related Articles

Watch CBS News

U.S. again issues wide-ranging warnings against travel to China and Hong Kong

September 15, 2020 / 6:51 AM EDT / AP

Beijing — The U.S. on Tuesday issued a sweeping new advisory warning against travel to mainland China and Hong Kong, citing the risk of "arbitrary detention" and "arbitrary enforcement of local laws."

The advisory is likely to heighten tensions between the sides that have spiked since Beijing's imposition on Hong Kong of a strict new national security law in June that has already been met with a series of U.S. punitive actions .

The statement warned U.S. citizens that China imposes "arbitrary detention and exit bans" to compel cooperation with investigations, pressure family members to return to China from abroad, influence civil disputes and "gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments."

"U.S. citizens traveling or residing in China or Hong Kong, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law," the advisory said.

In Hong Kong, China "unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power," the advisory said, adding that new legislation also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, possibly subjecting U.S. citizens who have publicly criticized China to a "heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution."

When in Hong Kong, U.S. citizens are "strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations," the advisory said.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin told reporters at a daily briefing Tuesday that the U.S. should "fully respect the facts and should not engage in unwarranted political manipulation" when issuing such advisories.

"China has always protected the safety and legal rights of foreigners in China in accordance with law. China is one of the safest countries in the world," Wang said. "Of course, foreigners in China also have an obligation to abide by Chinese laws."

Last month, the Trump administration suspended or terminated three bilateral agreements with Hong Kong covering extradition and tax exemptions, citing Beijing's violation of its pledge for Hong Kong to retain broad autonomy for 50 years after the former British colony's 1997 handover to Chinese rule.

Other Western nations have also suspended their extradition treaties with Hong Kong following the national security's law's passage.

The U.S. has also acted to end special trade and commercial privileges that Hong Kong had enjoyed and has imposed sanctions on Hong Kong and Chinese officials, including Hong Kong's pro-Beijing leader Carrie Lam , involved in enforcing the new security law.

Tensions between Beijing and Washington have hit their lowest point in decades amid simmering disputes over trade, technology, Taiwan, Tibet, the South China Sea, the coronavirus pandemic and, most recently, Hong Kong. The impact of the tensions has been felt in the tit-for-tat closures of diplomatic missions as well as visa restrictions on students and journalists.

The latest travel advisory did not offer any new warnings regarding COVID-19 in mainland China and Hong Kong, but referred travelers to earlier notices advising Americans to avoid the regions and return home from them if possible.

President Trump has assigned full blame to Beijing for the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., deflecting criticism of his own handling of the pandemic that threatens his reelection.

The virus was first detected in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year, leading to the global pandemic. Critics have accused Beijing of an initial cover-up attempt, although Mr. Trump himself has admitted to downplaying the severity of the virus as early as February.

China appears to have contained the virus within its borders, reporting no new cases of domestic infection in a month, while Hong Kong has also radically brought down its numbers of new cases.

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What the Changes to China's Travel Advisory Really Mean

Image may contain Wall Outdoors Nature Path Walkway Flagstone Slate Castle Architecture Building and Slope

On Thursday, the U.S. State Department updated its travel advisory to China , urging Americans to “exercise increased caution in China due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws as well as special restrictions on dual U.S.-Chinese nationals." Specifically, the advisory references “exit bans,” which Chinese authorities use to bar a person from leaving the country. The travel advisory is actually nothing new—in fact, it's a renewal of a similar warning issued on January 22 of last year, reports The New York Times . But why has it been updated, and what does this mean for travelers? We dive in.

First things first: How does this affect my travel to the country?

It shouldn't, really, though you'll want to take more precautions where suggested. The level of the advisory hasn't changed, just the details in it. As always, take steps to prepare for your trip by reading up on your destination and filling out a traveler checklist before you take off.

You mentioned a "level" of travel advisory. So, what is China's?

For a year, it's been at a Level 2 out of 4, which states travelers should "exercise increased caution" when in the country. For perspective, the U.S. has also given Level 2 warnings to the United Kingdom, Spain, Russia, Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, and the Netherlands, citing the risk of terrorism for those rankings. Antarctica even has a Level 2 "due to environmental hazards posed by extreme and unpredictable weather." China's Level 2, meanwhile, stems from fears that it may arbitrarily enforce local laws and detain U.S. citizens—more on that later.

The next, more serious warnings, are Level 3 (which suggests U.S. citizens "Reconsider travel" to the country) and Level 4, which stipulates "Do not travel." (Note: China's updated travel advisory does not apply to the autonomous territory of Hong Kong , which has a Level 1 warning , suggesting travelers "exercise normal precautions.") You can read more about the travel advisory system here .

What do travel specialists say about this?

"I read the travel advisory in detail, and don’t think it’s anything for our guests to worry about," says WildChina founder and CEO Mei Zhang. "First of all, we have not heard a single case of trouble exiting China among all WildChina clients, as well as clients of my counterparts in the travel trade. Secondly, the travel warning seems to be specifically targeting those with deep business and political ties with China."

I'd like to know more about what's changed in the travel advisory. What can you tell me?

The travel advisory now notes that exit bans are used "to lure individuals back to China from abroad," something that was not mentioned when the warning was issued in 2018, reports CNBC . (This appears to reference the case of an American family barred from leaving China because of their ties to a businessman accused of participation in a fraud case; more information can be found here .) The advisory also follows high-profile December cases in which two Canadian businessmen, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, were detained for unspecified reasons, reports Reuters . Both Kovrig and Spavor remain in detention in China and are awaiting trial, with the U.S. and Canada calling for their release .

The updated advisory also warns of increased police presence in certain regions, stating, "Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uighur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice." The Xinjiang Uighur region in northwest China is home to the Turkic-speaking Muslim Uighur minority, and though they disputed an August 2018 report from the UN that they were holding people in counter-extremism centers, China has acknowledged that it has resettled some of its "religious extremist" Uighurs, reports the BBC . And in April 2018, the U.S. State Department noted China's “severe” repression in Tibet, including arbitrary detention, censorship, and travel restrictions, reports Bloomberg .

You can read the full travel advisory here .

What does China say about all of this?

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said on Friday that the advisory “cannot stand up to scrutiny,” telling the Associated Press that 2.3 million Americans visited China between January and November 2018. “I think this figure speaks volumes for the security condition in China,” Lu said.

Lu did not comment on the detainees in China, but in December, said regarding Kovrig and Spavor, “I can tell you that their legitimate rights and interests have been safeguarded," reports the Washington Post .

I have a trip to China planned. How should I prepare?

According to the State Department, you should:

  • Enter China on your U.S. passport with a valid Chinese visa and keep it with you.
  • If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or the nearest consulate immediately. ( Here's the page for the U.S. embassy in Beijing, and for the U.S. consulate in Shanghai .)
  • If you plan to enter North Korea, read the North Korea travel advisory . (For reference, North Korea's travel advisory is at a Level 4—"Do not travel.")
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency. (We've got a handy guide to signing up here .)
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter . Follow the U.S. Embassy on Twitter , WeChat , and Weibo .
  • Before and during travel, review and stay up to date on the the Crime and Safety Reports for China.
  • Have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist .

This is a developing story. Please continue to check back for more information.

With additional reporting by Bridget Hallinan.

us travel warnings to china

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China Tells Taiwanese to Visit 'In High Spirits', Despite Execution Threat

China Tells Taiwanese to Visit 'In High Spirits', Despite Execution Threat

Reuters

Chinese and Taiwanese flags are seen through broken glass in this illustration taken, April 11, 2023. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration/ File Photo

BEIJING (Reuters) - Most Taiwanese can visit China with no need to worry and can come "in high spirits", the Chinese government said, condemning Taiwan for warning its citizens not to go following a threat from Beijing to execute "diehard" separatists.

Taiwan's government raised its travel warning for China this week, telling people not to go unless absolutely necessary after China announced legal guidelines threatening prosecution and in extreme cases the death penalty for Taiwan independence separatists.

In a statement late on Friday, China's Taiwan Affairs Office said the guidelines were only aimed a tiny number of separatists and their "evil words and actions". China views democratically governed Taiwan as its own territory.

Taiwan has ignored the facts and is trying to intimidate its own people for political means, which China is strongly opposed to, the office said in a statement.

"The majority of Taiwanese compatriots can participate in cross-strait exchanges and cooperation. They don't have to have any worries about travelling to and from the mainland. They can absolutely arrive in high spirits and depart well content."

China has vowed to pursue people it views as Taiwan separatists wherever they may be, though Chinese courts have no jurisdiction in Taiwan and it is not clear how China could seek to enforce any legal judgements outside its borders.

Taiwan's travel warning also applies to the Chinese cities of Hong Kong and Macau.

China has not hidden its dislike of Taiwan President Lai Ching-te, whom it views as a "separatist", staging two days of war games after he took office last month and regularly sending fighter jets and warships to operate around Taiwan.

Lai has repeatedly offered talks with China but been rebuffed. He rejects Beijing's sovereignty claims and says only Taiwan's people can decide their future.

China says any move by Taiwan to declare formal independence would be grounds to attack the island.

The government in Taipei says Taiwan is already an independent country, the Republic of China, and that it does not plan to change that. The Republican government fled to Taiwan in 1949 after losing a civil war with Mao Zedong's Communists.

(Reporting by Ryan Woo; Writing by Ben Blanchard)

Copyright 2024 Thomson Reuters .

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Tue, Jul 02, 2024 page1

Mac official reiterates warning on china travel.

  • By Chen Yu-fu and William Hetherington / Staff reporter, with staff writer and Bloomberg

us travel warnings to china

Mainland Affairs Council Deputy Minister Liang Wen-chieh (梁文傑) yesterday reiterated the council’s call to Taiwanese to be mindful when traveling in China due to increased safety concerns.

In a radio interview, talk show host Huang Wei-han (黃暐瀚) asked Liang to comment on the council raising its travel alert for China to “orange” — the second-highest alert — and its effect on Taiwanese who operate businesses in China or need to visit China.

The government uses a four-tier travel advisory regarding safety and security risks in other countries and territories.

us travel warnings to china

Mainland Affairs Council Deputy Minister Liang Wen-chieh speaks at a news conference in Taipei on June 20.

Photo: Chen Yu-fu, Taipei Times

The council on Thursday last week raised the travel alert for China, Hong Kong and Macau to “orange,” advising Taiwanese to avoid unnecessary travel to these areas.

Liang yesterday said that for Taiwanese businesspeople based in China, raising the alert was meant to remind them about China’s amended Counter-Espionage Law and Law on the Guarding of State Secrets.

The amendments to the espionage law took effect yesterday, and enable Chinese national security authorities to inspect travelers’ smartphones and other electronic devices.

us travel warnings to china

A person walks past an electronic billboard at Taipei International Airport (Songshan airport) calling on Taiwanese traveling to China to register on the Mainland Affairs Council’s online platform.

A Taiwanese businessman for unknown reasons was recently accused of contravening China’s National Security Law, Liang said.

In related news, Taiwanese senior security officials on Friday told a briefing in Taipei that Beijing is likely to detain more Taiwanese under a law that targets supporters of Taiwanese independence in a bid to pressure President William Lai (賴清德).

They were referring to a set of new legal guidelines issued by Beijing on June 21 that allow courts in China to try “Taiwan independence separatists” in absentia, with “die-hard” advocates of independence convicted of inciting secession and causing “grave harm to the state and the [Chinese] people” potentially facing the death penalty.

The move by Beijing to flesh out the law amounted to weaponizing its legislation against Taiwan, said the officials, who asked not to be identified.

The officials were speaking based on assessments made by Taiwan’s national security apparatus, rather than any intelligence they had gathered.

China has detained 15 Taiwanese over the past few years, the officials said.

Beijing sees Lai as an independence advocate, and has vowed unify with Taiwan, by force if necessary.

After Lai won the presidential election in January, Nauru switched diplomatic recognition from Taipei to Beijing, and just days after he took office on May 20, China held its most expansive military drills in a year around Taiwan.

It also hit five Taiwanese political commentators with largely symbolic sanctions, saying they had “incited hostility and confrontation between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait.”

From January to May there were 74 personal safety-related complaints and 13 property rights-related complaints filed with the Straits Exchange Foundation by Taiwanese businesspeople operating in China, foundation data showed.

China’s relatively weak economic recovery, combined with low consumer spending, has prompted local governments in the country to scrutinize the taxes of businesses operating there, a source said on Sunday.

The situation has prompted many Taiwanese businesses to withdraw from the Chinese market, but those exiting the market are finding it hard to get their funds out of China, the source said.

“China has control over the remittance of funds, so some Taiwanese businesspeople choose to use back channels,” the source said.

“In some cases, the money is embezzled and is difficult to recover even when the victim reports the matter,” they said.

The standard is for back channel services to take a 30 to 40 percent cut of the funds they are handling, and anyone using such services can risk losing all of their money, the source said.

“Taiwanese businesspeople in China who use these services tend to do so because they urgently need their money accessible to them in Taiwan,” the source said. “But the risk is very high, and anyone not in a hurry would refuse to pay such a high commission.”

In some cases, businesspeople encountering trouble in China can get assistance from the foundation, which would communicate with its Chinese counterpart, the Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits (ARATS), the source said. However, contacting ARATS is not an option when back channels have been used to transfer money out of China, they said.

“Even if ARATS could be contacted in such cases, it would not be in the Taiwanese person’s interest to do so, as that would incriminate them,” the source said. “From a legal perspective, it is also difficult to prove how much money was originally transferred and how much money was embezzled. There is no receipt for this kind of thing.”

There have also been cases in which Taiwanese businesspeople have defrauded other Taiwanese businesspeople in China, they said.

For example, the person committing fraud might accept a sum of money and promise to transfer it to a third country before transferring it to Taiwan through private channels, but never transfer the money to Taiwan, the source said.

“We have seen some people who, in a bid to avoid risk, will just move money out of China using Chinese UnionPay cards, slowly withdrawing it in Taiwan through several ATM transactions per year,” the source said. “In other cases people have transferred money to Southeast Asia in the name of reinvestment, and then transferred it from there to Taiwan.”

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ESCALATING TENSIONS: The US called for restraint and meaningful dialogue after Beijing threatened Taiwanese independence advocates with the death sentence The US on Monday condemned China’s “escalatory and destabilizing language and actions” toward Taiwan after Beijing last week announced new guidelines to punish supporters of Taiwanese independence. Asked about the guidelines, which included the death sentence for “diehard” independence advocates, US Department of State spokesman Matthew Miller said: “We strongly condemn the escalatory and destabilizing language and actions from PRC [People’s Republic of China] officials.” “We continue to urge restraint and no unilateral change to the status quo,” he said at the press briefing. The US urges China to “engage in meaningful dialogue with Taiwan,” Miller said, adding that “threats and legal

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DEATH THREAT: A MAC official said that it has urged Beijing to avoid creating barriers that would impede exchanges across the Strait, but it continues to do so People should avoid unnecessary travel to China after Beijing issued 22 guidelines allowing its courts to try in absentia and sentence to death “Taiwan independence separatists,” the Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) said yesterday as it raised its travel alert for China, including Hong Kong and Macau, to “orange.” The guidelines published last week “severely threaten the personal safety of Taiwanese traveling to China, Hong Kong and Macau,” MAC Deputy Minister and spokesman Liang Wen-chieh (梁文傑) told a news conference in Taipei. “Following a comprehensive assessment, the government considers it necessary to elevate the travel alert to orange from yellow,” Liang said. Beijing has

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us travel warnings to china

China is planning ‘major’ economic reforms, Xi says

Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) yesterday said that the Chinese Communist Party was planning and implementing “major” reforms, ahead of a political conclave that is expected to put economic recovery high on the agenda. Chinese policymakers have struggled to reignite growth since late 2022, when restrictions put in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic were lifted. The world’s second-largest economy is beset by a debt crisis in the property sector, persistently low consumption and high unemployment among young people. Policymakers “are planning and implementing major measures to further deepen reform in a comprehensive manner,” Xi said in a speech at the Great Hall

us travel warnings to china

Two to four typhoons to come close to Taiwan: CWA

WATER CONCERNS: The CWA encouraged people to conserve water, as fewer typhoons would bring less rain, and the plum rain season brought in only 60% of average rainfall About two to four typhoons are forecast to come close to Taiwan between now and November, the Central Weather Administration (CWA) said yesterday, as it also forecast that extreme heat would persist throughout the week, only dropping by 1°C after Friday. The number of typhoons is slightly lower than the average of three to five, reflecting a weakening El Nino weather pattern and the possibility of a La Nina pattern approaching, CWA Weather Forecast Center Director Chen Yi-liang (陳怡良) told a news conference in Taipei. While typically fewer typhoons develop under such conditions, their routes would be more likely to pass near

us travel warnings to china

us travel warnings to china

Taiwan Warns Citizens: Avoid Travel to China Amid New Threats

The Taiwanese government has raised its travel alert, urging its citizens to avoid traveling to China unless necessary.

According to Reuters , Liang Wen-chieh, a spokesperson for Taiwan ’s Mainland Affairs Council, responsible for relations with mainland China, announced on the 27th that the upgraded travel alert applies to Hong Kong and Macao, under China administration. Taiwan’s travel warnings are categorized into four levels, and the alert issued for China is currently at the second-highest level, marked as an orange warning, following the most severe red alert, which imposes a travel ban. Taiwan’s decision follows China’s recent announcement of criminal penalties, including the potential imposition of the death penalty for individuals advocating Taiwanese independence.

It was reported that Taiwanese President Lai Ching Te also emphasized during a central executive meeting of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) that “over 90% of Taiwanese could be affected” by China’s recent guidelines and stressed “the need for unity among all parties to confront them.”

Chinese authorities previously announced guidelines on the 21st stating that “Chinese courts, prosecutors, and security agencies must severely punish stubborn Taiwan independence activists who instigate the separation and independence of the country according to the law, and resolutely defend national sovereignty, unity, and territorial integrity.”

China, which regards Taiwan as a special administrative region similar to Hong Kong and Macao, enacted an Anti-secession Law in March 2005 in response to concerns that then-Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian might lead an independence movement from China. This recent guideline enactment is seen as a supplement to that law.

It is interpreted as an attack targeting the Tsai administration, which leans towards the US and against China. Accordingly, concerns are rising that Chinese authorities may arbitrarily arrest and criminally punish Taiwanese who do not accept the 1992 Consensus, an agreement between China and Taiwan’s Kuomintang (KMT) acknowledging the One-China principle while allowing for different interpretations, which DPP does not recognize.

Read more: Indonesian Woman Falls Out of Gym Building Through a Window Behind Her Treadmill

Diplomatic sources have assessed that tensions between the two sides are escalating as Chinese authorities, who have been intensifying political, economic, military, and security pressure on the Tsai administration, have now enacted guidelines that could lead to the death penalty for Taiwanese independence activists have further exacerbated the situation. 

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Taiwan Warns Citizens: Avoid Travel to China Amid New Threats

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DHS Conducts Removal Flight to China

WASHINGTON – This weekend, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), through U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), conducted a removal flight to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) of Chinese nationals. This was the first large charter flight since 2018 and was conducted in close coordination with the National Immigration Administration of the PRC. DHS continues to work with the PRC’s Ministry of Public Security and National Immigration Administration on additional removal flights.

DHS enforces our immigration laws and delivers tough consequences for those who do not have a lawful basis to remain, consistent with international obligations. On June 4, President Biden issued a Proclamation to temporarily suspend the entry of certain noncitizens across the Southern border. As a result, the Border Patrol’s 7-day encounter average has decreased more than 40%, and DHS has operated more than 120 international repatriation flights to more than 20 countries—including this one. A majority of all Southwest Border encounters during the past three fiscal years resulted in a removal, return, or expulsion.

“We will continue to enforce our immigration laws and remove individuals without a legal basis to remain in the United States,” said Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas . “People should not believe the lies of smugglers.”

This removal flight is the result of Secretary Mayorkas’ continued efforts to engage the PRC on areas of mutual interest. Together, the United States and PRC are working to reduce and deter irregular migration and to disrupt illicit human smuggling through expanded law enforcement efforts. DHS regularly engages counterparts throughout the hemisphere and around the world to accept repatriations of nationals without a lawful basis to remain in the United States and take other steps to reduce irregular migration, promote safe, lawful, and orderly pathways, and hold transnational criminal networks accountable for abusing our lawful trade and travel systems and the smuggling and exploitation of vulnerable people. To that end, the United States also welcomes the recent announcement from Ecuador to require visas for passport holders from the PRC given smugglers’ efforts to exploit that route.

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U.S. Deports Chinese Migrants in First Large Flight Since 2018

The Department of Homeland Security said it was working with Chinese authorities to arrange more flights as more migrants enter the United States.

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A person walks through a forest.

By Yan Zhuang

The United States sent a group of migrants back to China on the first large deportation flight there since 2018, and said on Tuesday that it was working with Chinese authorities to arrange additional flights.

The deportation, on a charter flight, took place over the weekend in coordination with Chinese authorities, the Department of Homeland Security said. The department confirmed that 116 people from China were deported.

U.S. and Chinese authorities were working together on additional removal flights, the statement said.

The announcement comes during an intense debate about immigration and border policy in the lead-up to the U.S. presidential election in November. Since last year, a g rowing number of Chinese migrants has made the journey into the U.S. through its southern border, hoping to escape bleak economic prospects and political oppression.

Many follow a route made popular on social media that takes them through the treacherous Darién Gap on the border of Panama and Colombia, the only land route north from South America as migrants head to the United States. Once they arrive at the southern border, they surrender to U.S. border officers and apply for asylum, citing a credible fear if they are sent back to China.

On Monday, the U.S. government announced that it had signed an agreement with Panama aimed at halting the flow of migrants through the Darién Gap. The United States will provide funding and training for the new flight removal program, the State Department said .

Liu Pengyu, a spokesman for the Chinese Embassy in Washington, said in a statement that the Chinese government “has carried out international law enforcement cooperation with the immigration law enforcement departments of relevant countries to repatriate people involved in smuggling activities,” adding that it has sent them “to their original places of residence, and pursued their legal responsibility in accordance with the law.”

In the 2023 fiscal year, more than 24,000 Chinese migrants were temporarily detained on the U.S. southern border, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection — more than in the preceding 10 years combined.

Last year, Chinese migrants became the fourth-largest group crossing into the U.S. that way, exceeded only by Venezuelans, Ecuadoreans and Haitians, according to Panama immigration authorities.

Yan Zhuang is a Times reporter in Seoul who covers breaking news. More about Yan Zhuang

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Taiwan warns against travel to China after execution threat

Daly Life In Taiwan

TAIPEI, Taiwan — Taiwan ’s government raised its travel warning for China on Thursday, telling its citizens not to go unless absolutely necessary, following a threat from Beijing last week to execute those deemed “diehard” Taiwan independence supporters.

Liang Wen-chieh, spokesperson for Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, told reporters the raised travel warning also applied to the Chinese-run cities of Hong Kong and Macau.

China, which views democratically governed Taiwan as its own territory , has made no secret of its dislike of President Lai Ching-te , whom it views as a “separatist,” and staged two days of war games  after he took office last month.

Last week, announcing new legal guidelines, China threatened to execute Taiwan independence separatists in extreme cases, a further ramping up of tensions that drew condemnation from Lai and his government, as well as the United States.

Liang, making the announcement at a regular news conference in Taipei, said those guidelines represented a serious threat to the safety of Taiwanese visiting China, in addition to other measures China has been taking to strengthen its national security laws.

“If it is not necessary to go, then don’t,” he said, adding this did not amount to a ban on visiting and was about protecting Taiwan’s people and reminding them of the risk rather than being a “countermeasure.”

China’s Taiwan Affairs Office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

On Wednesday, asked about concerns that the guidelines could cause fear for Taiwan’s people and not help improve relations, the office said they were only aimed at a very small number of independence “diehards’ evil words and actions.”

China has vowed to go after people it views as Taiwan separatists wherever they may be, though Chinese courts have no jurisdiction in Taiwan and it is not clear how China could seek to enforce any judgments outside its borders.

As to whether China could seek to extradite Taiwanese overseas who it accused of separatism, Liang said separatism was a political crime and in this particular case one specific to China, and that developed countries would not cooperate with such a request.

“We can’t rule out certain countries would cooperate,” he added, without naming any countries.

Lai has repeatedly offered talks with China but been rebuffed. He rejects Beijing’s sovereignty claims and says only Taiwan’s people can decide their future.

us travel warnings to china

COMMENTS

  1. China Travel Advisory

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  5. US recommends Americans reconsider traveling to China due to arbitrary

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  6. China International Travel Information

    Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). See the State Department's travel website for the Worldwide Caution and Travel Advisories.

  7. China Travel Advisory

    September 29, 2020. Reconsider travel to the People's Republic of China (PRC), including the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), due to COVID-19 and arbitrary enforcement of local laws. Read the Department of State's COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for the PRC ...

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  13. U.S. considers easing warnings for Americans traveling to China

    The U.S. is considering easing advisories against its citizens traveling to China, Deputy Secretary of State Kurt Campbell said on Tuesday, acknowledging concerns that the warnings may have ...

  14. State Dept. warns Americans to 'reconsider' China travel ...

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  15. U.S. again issues wide-ranging warnings against travel to China and

    September 15, 2020 / 6:51 AM EDT / AP. Beijing — The U.S. on Tuesday issued a sweeping new advisory warning against travel to mainland China and Hong Kong, citing the risk of "arbitrary ...

  16. What the Changes to China's Travel Advisory Really Mean

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  17. Americans should 'reconsider travel' to mainland China: US travel advisory

    The U.S. is recommending that Americans "reconsider travel" to mainland China because of "arbitrary" law enforcement and the risk of wrongful detention, according to a new travel advisory.

  18. China Travel Advisory Update: Level 4

    U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a Warning Level 3 Alert (Avoid Nonessential Travel) due to an ongoing outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that can be spread from person to person. If you must travel to Wuhan, you should: Avoid contact with sick people.

  19. State Dept. warns Americans to 'reconsider' China travel, citing 'risk

    The State Department has issued an updated advisory urging Americans to "reconsider travel" to China "due to the arbitrary enforcement of local laws.". AFP via Getty Images. 5. "The ...

  20. U.S. recommends Americans reconsider traveling to China due to

    The warnings come as U.S.-China relations are at their lowest in years, over trade, technology, Taiwan and human rights, although the sides are taking some steps to improve the situation.

  21. China denounces U.S.' China travel warning

    Updated 22:09, 10-Jul-2023. CGTN. China on Monday denounced the U.S.' travel warning against heading to China and urged the U.S. to stop actions that disrupt the pragmatic cooperation between the two countries. The remarks were made by Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Mao Ning at a regular press briefing in response to a travel advisory ...

  22. Taiwan Raises Alert Level for Travel to China After New Legal

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  23. China Tells Taiwanese to Visit 'In High Spirits', Despite Execution Threat

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  24. MAC official reiterates warning on China travel

    DEATH THREAT: A MAC official said that it has urged Beijing to avoid creating barriers that would impede exchanges across the Strait, but it continues to do so People should avoid unnecessary travel to China after Beijing issued 22 guidelines allowing its courts to try in absentia and sentence to death "Taiwan independence separatists," the Mainland Affairs Council (MAC) said yesterday as ...

  25. Taiwan Warns Citizens: Avoid Travel to China Amid New Threats

    Taiwan's travel warnings are categorized into four levels, and the alert issued for China is currently at the second-highest level, marked as an orange warning, following the most severe red ...

  26. DHS Conducts Removal Flight to China

    WASHINGTON - This weekend, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), through U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), conducted a removal flight to the People's Republic of China (PRC) of Chinese nationals.

  27. Taiwan warns against travel to China after execution threat

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  28. U.S. Deports Chinese Migrants in First Large Flight Since 2018

    The United States sent a group of migrants back to China on the first large deportation flight there since 2018, and said on Tuesday that it was working with Chinese authorities to arrange ...

  29. U.S. Mission China Statement on Travel Advisory and Authorized

    Additionally, American citizens should not travel to the PRC's Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, Jilin province, and Shanghai municipality due to COVID-19-related restrictions, including the risk of parents and children being separated. We are providing support to our U.S. citizen community throughout China.

  30. Taiwan warns against travel to China after execution threat

    The raised travel warning, which follows a threat from Beijing to execute "diehard" Taiwan independence supporters, also applies to the Chinese-run cities of Hong Kong and Macau.