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South Korea (Republic of Korea)

Latest update.

Exercise normal safety precautions in South Korea.

South Korea

South Korea (PDF 255.07 KB)

Asia (PDF 2.21 MB)

Local emergency contacts

Fire and rescue services, medical emergencies.

Call 119 or go to the hospital.

Call 112 or go to the nearest police station.

Advice levels

  • South Korea and North Korea are technically still at war, and tensions have increased in recent times. North Korea periodically conducts missile launches and other provocations. Monitor developments. Consider downloading the South Korean Government's 'Emergency Ready' app.
  • Civil emergency drills are held a few times a year for fire, earthquakes, other disasters and civil defence training. Nationwide exercises take place at least twice a year. Regional drills may also be run a few times a year. 
  • Large-scale public gatherings and protests are common, particularly in Seoul. Protests are generally peaceful and policed but can turn violent. 
  • Avoid large public gatherings and take extra care in any crowded space. South Korea remains safe for most travellers, with a relatively low crime rate. However, petty crime happens, especially in major cities such as Seoul and Busan. Watch your belongings.
  • Sexual assault and harassment, drink spiking and other violent crimes occur, particularly around bars and nightlife areas, such as Itaewon and Hongdae. Don't accept food, drink, gum or cigarettes from strangers. Remain vigilant, take care when walking at night, and travel in groups if possible.
  • The rainy season is from late June to late August. Typhoons can happen in August and September. Excessive rain during summer can cause flooding, landslides, and damage to housing and infrastructure. Identify your local shelter (identified by the word 대피소). Follow the advice of local officials.
  • Earthquakes and tsunamis are a risk. Know the tsunami warning signs and move to high ground straight away. Don't wait for official alerts, warnings or sirens.

Full travel advice:  Safety

  • There are high levels of pollution, particularly between March to May. During this time, strong winds from Mongolia and China also carry yellow dust to the Korean Peninsula. This can cause eye, nose, mouth, and throat irritations. Get medical advice if you have heart or breathing problems.
  • The standard of medical facilities in South Korea is usually good, but few staff speak English. You'll probably have to pay up-front. Ensure your travel insurance covers all medical costs.
  • South Korea is popular for medical tourism. If you're travelling for a procedure, research and choose your medical service providers carefully. Don’t use discount or uncertified providers. Ensure your travel insurance covers complications from surgery.

Full travel advice:  Health

  • You're required to wear a mask  in hospitals. Penalties of up to KRW100,000 apply. Exceptions for mask wearing are made for children under 24 months or people with disabilities, or those who have difficulty wearing a face mask for medical reasons.
  • Using shared electric scooters in South Korea is increasing. A driver’s license is required, and you must wear a helmet while riding. Make sure you have adequate health and liability insurance before riding. 
  • It's illegal to work or volunteer in South Korea if it's not specified in your visa. If you plan to work, arrange a work visa through a  South Korean embassy or consulate  before you travel.
  • Disputes over working and living conditions for Australians teaching English in South Korea are common. Research your employer and employment agency. Get legal advice before you sign a contract.
  • Be careful when taking photos and videos. It's illegal to photograph military zones, assets, personnel, and official buildings.
  • South Korea recognises dual nationality only in certain circumstances. If you're a male Australian-South Korean dual national, you may have to do military service when you arrive. This could happen even if you travel on your Australian passport. Get advice from an  embassy or consulate of the Republic of Korea  before travelling.

Full travel advice:  Local laws

Australian passport holders can visit South Korea as tourists for stays of up to 90 days without applying for a K-ETA (or visa waiver). Previously approved K-ETA applications will remain valid up to the granted expiry date. Visit the official  K-ETA website  for more information.

  • You may be required to register on the  Korean Q-code registration system  prior to arrival or to complete a health questionnaire on arrival. Further information is available on the ' Notices ' page. Check with the Republic of Korea Embassy or Consulate for the latest requirements for Australians. 
  • Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. You should contact the nearest embassy or consulate of South Korea for the latest details.

Full travel advice:  Travel

Local contacts

  • The  Consular Services Charter  details what we can and can't do to help you overseas.
  • For consular help, contact the  Australian Embassy in Seoul .
  • To stay up to date with local information, follow the Embassy’s social media accounts

Full travel advice:  Local contacts

Full advice

Regional threats.

South Korea and North Korea are technically still at war, and peace is maintained under a truce agreed at the practical end of the Korean War in 1953. Tensions have increased in recent times.

The Korean Peninsula is divided by a demilitarised zone (DMZ) separating:

  • North Korea or the Democratic People's Republic of Korea
  • South Korea or the Republic of Korea

North Korea regularly conducts ballistic missile launches and has conducted underground nuclear tests. Low-level military clashes have occurred. 

Tensions in the region could further increase without warning.

North Korea may conduct more serious provocations, which could lead to responses from its neighbours and their allies.

The South Korean government has released a free smartphone 'Emergency Ready' app. The app has information on local emergency services, including:

  • shelter locations

The app is available for both Apple and Android devices.

To protect yourself from threats in the region:

  • monitor developments
  • take official warnings seriously
  • follow the instructions of local authorities
  • consider downloading the 'Emergency Ready' app

Authorities control access to Yeonpyeong Island and other islands near the Northern Limit Line. This is due to their proximity to a disputed sea boundary.

More information:

  • Planning for emergencies

Public Safety

Parts of Seoul, particularly Itaewon and Hongdae, and on public transport, can become extremely crowded.  In October 2022, more than 150 people were killed in a crowd crush during Halloween festivities in Itaewon.  Take extra care in any crowded space. Consider leaving the area if you can. 

Civil Emergency Drills

Civil emergency drills are held a few times a year for fire, earthquakes, other disasters and civil defence training. 

Nationwide exercises take place at least twice a year. Regional drills may also be run a few times a year. 

Depending on the drill, sirens may sound, transport may stop, and authorities may ask people to take shelter in subway stations or basements. 

Follow the advice of local authorities. The South Korean government has released a free smartphone 'Emergency Ready' app. The app has information on civil defence drills, including shelters and safety guides.

  • Civil Defence Drills

Civil unrest and political tension

Public protests and events that draw large groups of people can turn violent. Avoid large public gatherings and take extra care in any crowded space.

Large-scale public gatherings and demonstrations are common, particularly in Seoul. 

To protect yourself during periods of unrest:

  • avoid protests and demonstrations
  • monitor the media for information

Be prepared to change your travel plans in case of disruptions.

  • Demonstrations and civil unrest

For most travellers, South Korea is safe and has a relatively low crime rate. However, petty crime happens, especially in major cities such as Seoul and Busan.

Sexual assault, drink spiking, and other violent crimes occur, particularly around bars and nightlife areas, such as Itaewon and Hongdae. 

To protect yourself from crime:

  • keep your belongings close
  • don't accept drinks, food, gum or cigarettes from strangers
  • don't leave food or drinks unattended
  • remain vigilant and take care when walking at night
  • travel in groups if possible

Local authorities may not always respond adequately or consistently to reports of sexual violence and harassment. If you're sexually assaulted, you should report it immediately to the local authorities and the Australian Embassy in Seoul. 

In general, sex-related crimes are not punished as harshly in South Korea as in Australia, and the prosecution process can be challenging for victims. 

You can report crimes, including sexual assault, to the police by calling 112. This is a 24/7 service with English interpreters available. 

  • Partying safely

Cyber security 

You may be at risk of cyber-based threats during overseas travel to any country. Digital identity theft is a growing concern. Your devices and personal data can be compromised, especially if you’re connecting to Wi-Fi, using or connecting to shared or public computers or to Bluetooth.

Social media can also be risky in destinations where there are social or political tensions, or laws that may seem unreasonable by Australian standards. Travellers have been arrested for things they have said on social media. Don't comment on local or political events on your social media.

More information: 

Cyber security when travelling overseas

Terrorism is a threat worldwide. Although there is no recent history of terrorism in South Korea, attacks can't be ruled out. 

You should be aware of the global risk of indiscriminate terrorist attacks, which could be in public areas, including those visited by foreigners.  

  • Terrorist threats

Climate and natural disasters

South Korea experiences  natural disasters  and  severe weather , such as:

  • flooding and landslides
  • earthquakes

Get familiar with the advice of local authorities on preparing for a natural disaster or other emergency.

If there's a natural disaster:

  • know your hotel or cruise ship evacuation plans
  • secure your passport in a safe, waterproof location
  • follow the advice of local authorities
  • closely monitor the media
  • keep in touch with friends and family

Register with the  Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System  to receive alerts on major disasters.

Typhoons and severe weather

The rainy season is from late June to late August.

Excessive rainfall during summer can cause severe flooding and landslides and damage to housing and infrastructure. Flash flooding can occur after short periods of rain.

Typhoons can happen in August and September. 

If there's a typhoon approaching, stay inside. The direction and strength of typhoons can change with little warning.

Identify your closest local shelter if required and follow the directions of local authorities. 

Severe weather may also affect:

  • access to ports
  • road travel and transport
  • essential services, such as water and power

If there's a typhoon or severe storm:

  • exercise caution
  • stay away from affected areas
  • you may get stuck in the area
  • flights could be delayed or suspended
  • available flights may fill quickly
  • adequate shelter may not be available

Monitor forecasts and follow instructions of local authorities.

Check with tour operators before travelling to affected areas.

Contact your airline for the latest flight information.

  • Korean Meteorological Administration
  • Severe Weather Information Centre
  • Special weather report - KMA
  • Real-time disaster alert – National Disaster and Safety Portal

Earthquakes and tsunamis

Earthquake activity happens on the Korean Peninsula, though less than in Japan and other countries in the region.

Tsunamis are also a risk.

If you are in a coastal region after a major earthquake, move to higher ground straight away.

  • Pacific Tsunami Warning Center
  • Korea Meteorological Administration

Travel insurance

Get comprehensive  travel insurance  before you leave.

Your policy needs to cover all overseas medical costs, including medical evacuation. The Australian Government won't pay for these costs.

If you can't afford travel insurance, you can't afford to travel. This applies to everyone, no matter how healthy and fit you are.

If you're not insured, you may have to pay many thousands of dollars up-front for medical care.

  • what activities and care your policy covers
  • that your insurance covers you for the whole time you'll be away

Physical and mental health

Consider your physical and mental health before you travel, especially if you have an existing medical condition. Treatment for mental health is not widely available in South Korea and is not comparable to services in Australia. There are very few hospitals that have mental health or psychiatric wards attached, and of those available, many will not accept foreigners. 

Admission to a mental health or psychiatric ward usually requires proof of a prior mental health diagnosis. For involuntary admissions, 2 family members present in Korea will be required to sign consent. Please consider this when planning your trip.

See your doctor or travel clinic to:

  • have a basic health check-up
  • ask if your travel plans may affect your health
  • plan any vaccinations you need

Do this at least 8 weeks before you leave.

If you have immediate concerns for your welfare, or the welfare of another Australian, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on +61 2 6261 3305 or contact your  nearest Australian Embassy, High Commission or Consulate  to discuss counselling hotlines and services available in your location.

  • General health advice
  • Healthy holiday tips  (Healthdirect Australia)

Medications

If you plan to travel with medication, check if it's legal in South Korea. Not all medication available over the counter or by prescription in Australia is available. Some medications may even be considered illegal or a controlled substance in South Korea, even if prescribed by an Australian doctor. Please check with  Korean authorities  whether your medication is a controlled or illegal substance in South Korea. 

Before you travel:

  • contact the South Korean  Ministry of Food and Drug Safety  or email  [email protected]  to check whether your medication is a controlled or illegal substance in South Korea
  • Check with the  Korea Customs Service  for information on restricted or prohibited items that may not be brought into the country
  • ask your doctor about alternative medicines

You may need to apply for a 'bring in' permit. When applying, provide the generic name of the medication, as the brand name may be different in Australia or Korea.

It may take authorities more than 2 weeks to process your application.

Take enough legal medicine for your trip.

Carry a copy of your prescription or a letter from your doctor stating:

  • what the medication is
  • your required dosage
  • that it's for personal use

Health risks

Insect-borne diseases.

Malaria  is a risk in:

  • the demilitarised zone
  • rural areas in the northern parts of Gyonggi and Gangwon provinces

Japanese encephalitis  also occurs.

To protect yourself from disease:

  • make sure your accommodation is insect-proof
  • use insect repellent
  • wear long, loose, light-coloured clothing
  • get vaccinated against Japanese encephalitis before you travel
  • consider taking medicine to prevent malaria

Other health risks

Waterborne, foodborne, and other  infectious diseases  occur, including:

  • tuberculosis

If you test positive for COVID-19 while in South Korea, local authorities recommend isolating for 5 days. 

Use normal hygiene precautions, including:

  • careful and frequent hand washing
  • boil tap water before drinking or cooking
  • avoid uncooked and undercooked food.
  • seek medical advice if you have a fever or are suffering from diarrhoea

Hand, foot and mouth disease

Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD)  is common.

Serious outbreaks sometimes occur.

Outbreaks usually start in March and peak in May but can continue until October each year.

The disease mostly affects children aged under 10 years. Adult cases, especially in young adults, are not unusual.

When outside major cities:

  • drink boiled water, filtered water or bottled water with sealed lids
  • avoid ice cubes
  • avoid uncooked and undercooked food, such as salads

Get medical advice if you have a fever or diarrhoea.

Yellow dust

Yellow dust is carried to the Korean Peninsula by strong winds from Mongolia and China from March to May. High levels of airborne pollution occur during this time.

The dust can:

  • cause eye, nose, mouth and throat irritations
  • make breathing and heart problems worse

If you're concerned about the effects of dust, speak to your doctor before leaving Australia. 

Get medical advice if you have allergies or breathing difficulties.

Medical facilities

The standard of medical facilities in South Korea is usually good, but few staff speak English.

Medical services can be expensive. Hospitals usually require an up-front deposit or confirmation of insurance before they'll treat you.

  • Medical tourism

South Korea is a popular destination for medical tourism.

To protect yourself:

  • research and choose your medical service providers carefully
  • avoid discounted or uncertified medical service providers

Check whether your travel insurance covers you if things go wrong with your surgery. Most insurers don't.

You're subject to all local laws and penalties, including those that may appear harsh by Australian standards. Research local laws before travelling.

You're required to wear a mask  in hospitals. Penalties of up to KRW100,000 apply. Exceptions for mask wearing are made for children under 24 months or people with disabilities, or those who may have difficulty wearing a face mask for medical reasons.

The use of shared electric scooters in South Korea is increasing. A driver’s license is not required, but you must wear a helmet while riding. Riders must be aged 13 years or older.

If you're arrested or jailed, the Australian Government will do what it can to help you under our  Consular Services Charter . But we can't get you out of trouble or out of jail.

Don't carry or consume illegal drugs.

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs include:

  • long jail sentences
  • heavy fines
  • deportation
  • Carrying or using drugs

It's illegal to work in South Korea if it's not specified in your visa. This includes paid and unpaid work.

Authorities have fined, detained and deported Australians for breaching their visa conditions.

It's difficult to change your visa type once you're in South Korea.

If you plan to work, arrange a work visa through a South Korean embassy or consulate before you travel.

Disputes over expected working and living conditions for Australians teaching English in South Korea are common.

Some Australians planning to teach English have faced penalties after they or their employment agent gave false documents to Korean immigration authorities.

If you're employed without the right visa, your options will be limited under Korean law.

If you're considering teaching English in South Korea:

  • research your employer and employment agent
  • consider getting legal advice before you sign a contract
  • make sure your visa application is truthful and accurate

Serious crimes, such as murder, may attract the death penalty.

It's illegal to take photos of and around:

  • military zones, assets or personnel
  • official buildings

South Korea has strict anti-corruption laws for public officials. Public officials and their spouses can't accept meals, gifts or other benefits above set limits.

'Public officials' include:

  • journalists
  • employees of government-owned or funded companies

Get legal advice to make sure you don't breach these laws.

If you're involved in a commercial or legal dispute, authorities could stop you from leaving.

Australian laws

Some Australian criminal laws still apply when you're overseas. If you break these laws, you may face prosecution in Australia.

  • Staying within the law

Dual citizenship

South Korea  recognises dual nationality only in certain circumstances.

It's possible that by applying for Australian Citizenship by Descent or by Conferral, you may lose your Korean citizenship.

If you've been arrested or detained and have Korean citizenship, we may only be able to provide limited consular help.

If you were born in South Korea or have Korean citizenship, you will continue to be a Korean citizen unless you:

  • formally renounce it; and
  • remove your name from the Korean family register

Military service is compulsory for male citizens of South Korea, including dual nationals.

The South Korean government may require you to undertake military service if you:

  • are male; and
  • are listed on the Korean family register

This is the case even if you're travelling on your Australian passport.

The government may not allow you to renounce your Korean nationality or leave the country until you either:

  • complete your military service, or
  • receive a special exemption from serving

If you're an Australian-South Korean dual national, get advice from an  embassy or consulate of the Republic of Korea  before you travel.

Contact the Korean Immigration Service for information on Korea’s law on dual citizenship.

  • Dual nationals

Visas and border measures

Every country or territory decides who can enter or leave through its borders. For specific information about the evidence you'll need to enter a foreign destination, check with the nearest embassy, consulate or immigration department of the destination you're entering. 

Long-term visa holders residing in South Korea must apply for a re-entry permit before leaving South Korea. If you leave South Korea without a re-entry permit, your Alien Registration Card may be cancelled and you'll need to apply for a new long-term visa to enter. If you hold an A1, A2, A3 or F4 visa, you're exempt from requiring a re-entry permit.

To apply for a re-entry permit, visit a local immigration office, including at an airport sea port. If you apply at an airport immigration office on your way out of South Korea, ensure you arrive earlier than usual to the airport.

Further information about re-entry permits and medical examination requirements is available from the Korean Ministry of Justice .

Entry and exit conditions can change at short notice. Contact the nearest  embassy or consulate of the Republic of Korea  for details about visas, currency, customs and quarantine rules.

Border measures

If you're travelling to South Korea, you may be required to register your information on the  Korean Q-code registration system  to receive a generated QR code for your arrival. Or complete a health questionnaire on arrival if you haven't registered online. 

You should also check the  Korean Q-code registration system  prior to travelling to South Korea, as countries listed as "Quarantine Inspection Required Areas" may change without notice.

When you arrive in South Korea you may need to:

  • Complete a health status document.
  • Provide contact details (mobile phone number and address). Your phone number will be verified on arrival, and you won’t be able to enter Korea with invalid contact details.
  • Be screened for high body temperature.

Contact the  Korean Embassy or Consulate  in Australia for more information when planning your travel and to confirm requirements.  

Other formalities

You'll be fingerprinted when you arrive.

All passengers arriving at South Korean airports are screened for infectious diseases, including:

  • Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

Extra quarantine checks are in place for flights from high-risk areas.

Korean Government Agencies

  • Korea Disease Control & Prevention Agency (KDCA)
  • Ministry of Health and Welfare
  • Ministry of Employment and Labor
  • Ministry of Education
  • Ministry of Gender Equality and Family
  • Ministry of the Interior and Safety
  • Ministry of Economy and Finance

Some countries won't let you enter unless your passport is valid for 6 months after you plan to leave that country. This can apply even if you're just transiting or stopping over.

Some foreign governments and airlines apply the rule inconsistently. Travellers can receive conflicting advice from different sources.

You can end up stranded if your passport is not valid for more than 6 months.

The Australian Government does not set these rules. Check your passport's expiry date before you travel. If you're not sure it'll be valid for long enough, consider getting  a new passport .

Lost or stolen passport

Your passport is a valuable document. It's attractive to people who may try to use your identity to commit crimes.

Some people may try to trick you into giving them your passport. Always keep it in a safe place.

If your passport is lost or stolen, tell the Australian Government as soon as possible:

  • In Australia, contact the  Australian Passport Information Service .
  • If you're overseas, contact the nearest  Australian embassy or consulate.

Passport with ‘X’ gender identifier 

Although Australian passports comply with international standards for sex and gender, we can’t guarantee that a passport showing 'X' in the sex field will be accepted for entry or transit by another country. Contact the  nearest  embassy, high commission or consulate of your destination  before you arrive at the border to confirm if authorities will accept passports with 'X' gender markers.

  • LGBTI travellers

The local currency is the Korean Won (KRW).

You can change Australian dollars for KRW at local banks and money changers.

Declare all local currency over 8 million KRW or $US10,000 or equivalent in foreign currency on arrival. This includes all forms of currency, not just cash.

ATMs are available in cities and larger towns but may not accept some debit cards.

Credit cards are usually accepted in hotels, restaurants, shops, and taxis, particularly in cities and larger towns.

Be aware of card skimming. See  Safety

Local travel

Driving permit.

To drive, you'll need either:

  • a valid local licence, or
  • an International Driver's Permit (IDP) and a valid Australian driver's licence

Get your IDP before your leave Australia.

You need a Korean driver's licence to drive if you'll stay 90 days or more.

You will need a certified copy of your Australian licence to apply for a Korean driver's licence. 

When issuing you with a Korean driver's licence, the local authorities will normally keep your Australian driver's licence. They will return your Australian licence to you in exchange for your Korean driver's licence before you depart Korea.  

  • Seoul Global Centre

Road travel

South Korea has one of the highest rates of traffic deaths for a developed country, especially for pedestrians.

You're more likely to die in a motor vehicle accident in South Korea than in Australia.

Speeding, running red lights and other risky behaviour is common, especially by buses, taxis and motorcyclists.

Motorcyclists often travel on footpaths and pedestrian crossings.

If you're involved in an accident, whether or not you're at fault, you could face criminal charges. You may need to pay compensation to the injured person.

The blood alcohol limit for drivers is 0.03%. Heavy penalties apply for exceeding the limit. Don't drink drive.

If you're walking:

  • look out for motorcyclists, even on footpaths and pedestrian crossings
  • don't expect traffic to stop at pedestrian crossings
  • check carefully before stepping onto the road

Before travelling by road, learn local road rules and practices. 

  • Driving or riding

Motorcycles

Check if your travel insurance policy covers you when riding a motorbike. Most policies won't cover you if you don't follow local laws or wear a helmet.

Always wear a helmet.

There are restrictions on riding motorcycles on highways and other major roads.

Use only authorised taxis, preferably those arranged through your hotel.

Always insist the driver uses the meter. Most taxis accept credit cards.

Rideshare apps are available in South Korea. These aren't widely used due to the large number of available taxis.

International taxi services are available and may have English-speaking drivers.

Public transport

Public transportation (including buses and metropolitan subway networks) in and between major urban areas is good.

Most major transportation systems have signs and make announcements in English.

  • Visit Korea
  • Transport and getting around safely

Rail travel

South Korea has a large high-speed rail network (KTX).

Stations are usually located in major urban areas. They usually have signs in English.

They're often linked to local taxi or public transport networks.

Ferry services operate between most large coastal cities and other domestic and international ports.

Busan is a regular stopover location for cruises.

  • Going on a cruise
  • Travelling by boat

Many airlines and travel providers don't allow you to pay for flights online within South Korea with a foreign credit card.

DFAT doesn't provide information on the safety of individual commercial airlines or flight paths.

Check  South Korea's air safety profile  with the Aviation Safety Network.

Emergencies

Depending on what you need, contact your:

  • family and friends
  • travel agent
  • insurance provider

To report a crime, call 112 or go to the nearest police station. This is a 24/7 service with English interpreters available. 

Always get a police report when you report a crime.

If you have lost any property, visit the  Lost112 website  for more information. 

  • Korea  Disease Control & Prevention (KDCA)

Consular contacts

Read the  Consular Services Charter  for what the Australian Government can and can't do to help you overseas.

For consular help, contact the Australian Embassy in Seoul.

Australian Embassy, Seoul

19th Floor, Kyobo Building 1, Jong-ro Jongno-gu Seoul 03154, Republic of Korea Phone: (+82 2) 2003 0100 Fax: (+82 2) 2003 0196 Website:  southkorea.embassy.gov.au Facebook:  Australia in the Republic of Korea Instagram:  @AusAmbKor

Check the Embassy website for details about opening hours and any temporary closures. 

24-hour Consular Emergency Centre

In a consular emergency, if you can't contact an embassy, call the 24-hour Consular Emergency Centre on:

  • +61 2 6261 3305 from overseas
  • 1300 555 135 in Australia

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Tourism Australia Announced to be Welcoming Back Travellers from South Korea to Australia

Published : Nov. 24, 2021 - 06:11

Link copied

South Korea We're Excited to Welcome You Back

SYDNEY , Nov. 23, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Tourism Australia is excited to be welcoming back travellers from South Korea to Australia , following today's announcement that Australia is reopening its borders to quarantine-free travel for fully vaccinated South Korean citizens from 1 December.

The announcement is part of Australia's phased re-opening to international travel and builds on quarantine free travel arrangement with Singapore , which came into effect on 21 November.

"The announcement today enabling fully vaccinated travellers from South Korea to travel to Australia from 1 December is an exciting and significant next step in rebuilding international visitation from this key tourism market," Tourism Australia Managing Director Phillipa Harrison said. 

" Australia has long been a popular outbound destination for travellers from South Korea , with 280,000 travelling to our country pre-COVID, and we are really excited that we will have the opportunity to welcome visitors from this important travel market once again.

"With the reopening of travel from South Korea , Tourism Australia will soon be kicking off dedicated marketing activity to urge travellers to come and enjoy all the incredible tourism experiences that await them in Australia ," Ms Harrison said.

The Australian Government has also announced fully vaccinated eligible visa holders will be able to entre Australia without needing to apply for a travel exemption from 1 December. Eligible visa holders include Working Holiday Makers (Subclass 417) and Work and Holiday Visa (Subclass 462).

"In addition to the announcement of quarantine free travel from South Korea to Australia , the return of eligible working holiday makers to Australia from 1 December is welcome news for our tourism industry.

"Working holiday makers are crucial to the tourism sector as these young travellers tend to stay longer, spend more and disperse more widely as they travel whilst also providing a flexible source of workers by combining their time in Australia with work and travel plans," Ms Harrison said.

Tourism Australia Executive General Manager Eastern Markets and Aviation Andrew Hogg said that he hoped South Korean citizens would make the most of the new quarantine-free travel arrangements and enjoy being amongst some of the first international travellers able to travel to Australia from 1 December.

" Australia has long been a popular travel destination for South Koreans, who spent $1.5 billion on their travels here in 2019," Mr Hogg said. 

" Australia's relative isolation from the rest of the world, coupled with its sparsely populated land and natural wonders, have never been more precious and desirable, and we hope that South Korean travellers will jump on the opportunity to fall in love with Australia all over again."  

"We are really excited to be able to welcome back South Korean travellers to take the opportunity to relax and discover – or perhaps rediscover – some of the lesser-known parts of Australia that make us such a popular holiday destination," Mr Hogg said.  

Tourism Australia will be kicking off a new tourism campaign to welcome South Korean citizens back to Australia in the coming weeks. As part of this campaign Tourism Australia will be working with a range of key distribution and airline partners including various airline partners to drive booking and drive recovery for Australia's hard-hit tourism economy by providing tactical offers aimed at stimulating travel to Australia from South Korea .

TRAVELLING TO AUSTRALIA

  • From 1 December, Republic of Korea citizens can now travel by air to Australia quarantine-free, without applying for a travel exemption.
  • Eligible Republic of Korea citizens who are fully vaccinated States can enter NSW, VIC and ACT and will not be required to quarantine. If planning on travelling onwards to or through a different state or territory when upon arrival in Australia , travellers will need to check  domestic travel restrictions .
  • To be eligible, travellers must:
  • hold a valid Australian visa
  • be fully vaccinated with a completed dosage of a vaccine approved or recognised by Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). Unvaccinated minors (17 and under) will be permitted to travel when travelling with a fully-vaccinated adult
  • depart from Korea and arrive in a  participating Australian state or territory
  • provide  proof of their vaccination status
  • present a negative COVID-19 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test taken within 3 days of departure (unless a  medical exemption  applies)
  • For more information on travelling to Australia go to the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs  I Travelling to Australia
  • For more rules and requirements for travel into specific state and territories in Australia go to the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs  I State and Territory Information .

MARKET PROFILE

  • South Korea is Australia's  tenth largest source market for international visitation and seventh most valuable for spend.  
  • In 2019, 281,000 South Korean travellers visited Australia , making up 3 per cent of all Australia's international arrivals.
  • Of the 281,000 Korean arrivals, 208,000 visited for leisure purposes. 67 per cent of Korean visitors visited for a holiday and 14 per cent visited friends or relatives.
  • Total expenditure in 2019 by Korean travellers equated to $1.5 billion , of which $986 million was spent by leisure travellers alone. On average they spend $4,738 per leisure trip and spend $169 per night.
  • Korean travellers spend on average 30 nights holidaying in Australia , of which 81 per cent are spent in capital cities.
  • 69 per cent of leisure travellers from South Korea are first-time visitors to Australia . Of the 31 per cent that made a return visit, 33 per cent had previously visited the country more than twice.  
  • 45 per cent of all visitors from South Korea in 2019 visited two or more cities or regions on their trip. NSW was the most visited state, followed by QLD, then VIC.
  • Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics- International Visitor Survey YE Dec 2019 .

Related Links :

http://www.tourism.australia.com/en-au/

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Tourism Australia Announced to be Welcoming Back Travellers from South Korea to Australia

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SYDNEY , Nov. 23, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Tourism Australia is excited to be welcoming back travellers from South Korea to Australia , following today's announcement that Australia is reopening its borders to quarantine-free travel for fully vaccinated South Korean citizens from 1 December.

The announcement is part of Australia's phased re-opening to international travel and builds on quarantine free travel arrangement with Singapore , which came into effect on 21 November.

"The announcement today enabling fully vaccinated travellers from South Korea to travel to Australia from 1 December is an exciting and significant next step in rebuilding international visitation from this key tourism market," Tourism Australia Managing Director Phillipa Harrison said. 

" Australia has long been a popular outbound destination for travellers from South Korea , with 280,000 travelling to our country pre-COVID, and we are really excited that we will have the opportunity to welcome visitors from this important travel market once again.

"With the reopening of travel from South Korea , Tourism Australia will soon be kicking off dedicated marketing activity to urge travellers to come and enjoy all the incredible tourism experiences that await them in Australia ," Ms Harrison said.

The Australian Government has also announced fully vaccinated eligible visa holders will be able to entre Australia without needing to apply for a travel exemption from 1 December. Eligible visa holders include Working Holiday Makers (Subclass 417) and Work and Holiday Visa (Subclass 462).

"In addition to the announcement of quarantine free travel from South Korea to Australia , the return of eligible working holiday makers to Australia from 1 December is welcome news for our tourism industry.

"Working holiday makers are crucial to the tourism sector as these young travellers tend to stay longer, spend more and disperse more widely as they travel whilst also providing a flexible source of workers by combining their time in Australia with work and travel plans," Ms Harrison said.

Tourism Australia Executive General Manager Eastern Markets and Aviation Andrew Hogg said that he hoped South Korean citizens would make the most of the new quarantine-free travel arrangements and enjoy being amongst some of the first international travellers able to travel to Australia from 1 December.

" Australia has long been a popular travel destination for South Koreans, who spent $1.5 billion on their travels here in 2019," Mr Hogg said. 

" Australia's relative isolation from the rest of the world, coupled with its sparsely populated land and natural wonders, have never been more precious and desirable, and we hope that South Korean travellers will jump on the opportunity to fall in love with Australia all over again."  

"We are really excited to be able to welcome back South Korean travellers to take the opportunity to relax and discover – or perhaps rediscover – some of the lesser-known parts of Australia that make us such a popular holiday destination," Mr Hogg said.  

Tourism Australia will be kicking off a new tourism campaign to welcome South Korean citizens back to Australia in the coming weeks. As part of this campaign Tourism Australia will be working with a range of key distribution and airline partners including various airline partners to drive booking and drive recovery for Australia's hard-hit tourism economy by providing tactical offers aimed at stimulating travel to Australia from South Korea .

TRAVELLING TO AUSTRALIA

  • From 1 December, Republic of Korea citizens can now travel by air to Australia quarantine-free, without applying for a travel exemption.
  • Eligible Republic of Korea citizens who are fully vaccinated States can enter NSW, VIC and ACT and will not be required to quarantine. If planning on travelling onwards to or through a different state or territory when upon arrival in Australia , travellers will need to check  domestic travel restrictions .
  • To be eligible, travellers must:
  • hold a valid Australian visa
  • be fully vaccinated with a completed dosage of a vaccine approved or recognised by Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). Unvaccinated minors (17 and under) will be permitted to travel when travelling with a fully-vaccinated adult
  • depart from Korea and arrive in a  participating Australian state or territory
  • provide  proof of their vaccination status
  • present a negative COVID-19 Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test taken within 3 days of departure (unless a  medical exemption  applies)
  • For more information on travelling to Australia go to the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs  I Travelling to Australia
  • For more rules and requirements for travel into specific state and territories in Australia go to the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs  I State and Territory Information .

MARKET PROFILE

  • South Korea is Australia's  tenth largest source market for international visitation and seventh most valuable for spend.  
  • In 2019, 281,000 South Korean travellers visited Australia , making up 3 per cent of all Australia's international arrivals.
  • Of the 281,000 Korean arrivals, 208,000 visited for leisure purposes. 67 per cent of Korean visitors visited for a holiday and 14 per cent visited friends or relatives.
  • Total expenditure in 2019 by Korean travellers equated to $1.5 billion , of which $986 million was spent by leisure travellers alone. On average they spend $4,738 per leisure trip and spend $169 per night.
  • Korean travellers spend on average 30 nights holidaying in Australia , of which 81 per cent are spent in capital cities.
  • 69 per cent of leisure travellers from South Korea are first-time visitors to Australia . Of the 31 per cent that made a return visit, 33 per cent had previously visited the country more than twice.  
  • 45 per cent of all visitors from South Korea in 2019 visited two or more cities or regions on their trip. NSW was the most visited state, followed by QLD, then VIC.
  • Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics- International Visitor Survey YE Dec 2019 .
  • http://www.tourism.australia.com/en-au/

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travel to australia from south korea

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K-ETA Application for Australian Citizens (01.04.2022)

K-ETA Information (ENG).pdf fileDownload

Government of the Republic of Korea will remove temporary suspension of visa-free entry from Friday 01.04.2022.

Above measure will enable citizens of 46 countries including Australia will be allowed to travel to the Republic of Korea by K-ETA from 01.04.2022.

Government of the Republic of Korea will commence K-ETA application to Australian Citizens from Wednesday, 30.03.2022 at 11:00AM AEST.

For more information, please keep checking the K-ETA website regularly for further update.

URL :  https://www.k-eta.go.kr/portal/apply/index.do

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South Korea Entry Requirements for Australian Citizens

Apply for a k-eta from australia.

Australians can now apply for a South Korea visa waiver. The K-ETA is required to travel from Australia to South Korea without a visa .

This page contains all the visa and K-ETA information you need to prepare for your trip to South Korea from Australia.

Do Australian Citizens Need a Visa for South Korea?

Yes, Australians need a visa or travel authorization to enter South Korea.

Australian passport holders can visit South Korea for up to 90 days without a visa for tourism and business activities. To visit the country visa-free, Australians must apply for a South Korea ETA travel authorization.

k eta australians

South Korea K-ETA for Australian Citizens

Australians can travel to South Korea with a K-ETA from Australia instead of a visa for:

  • 90 days or less
  • Tourism, visiting family, events and meetings, business

It is important to remember that the South Korea ETA is not a visa, but a visa waiver . It allows you to enter the country visa-free.

How to Apply for a South Korea Visa from Australia

Australian passport holders can get the South Korean ETA online in 3 steps .

  • Fill out the Korea eVisa application form
  • Pay the visa fees and submit the request
  • Receive the electronic travel document by email

Online visa waiver processing is fast . Most K-ETA applications from Australia will be reviewed and approved within 2 days, however we advise you to allow at least 3 working days to account for any delays.

If you need your South Korea visa waiver immediately, you can choose our priority service which guarantees an approved K-ETA from Australia within 1 hour .

South Korea Entry Requirements for Australians

To enter South Korea as an Australian citizen, you must have the following documents :

  • Valid Australian passport
  • Approved K-ETA or visa

You may also need additional COVID-19 documents to enter South Korea during the pandemic. You should check the current travel restrictions for South Korea before your trip.

Document Requirements to Enter South Korea from Australia

Australians can travel to South Korea with a K-ETA from Australia instead of a visa for

To stay longer than 90 days , or for other purposes, you need to apply for one of the other South Korea visa types for Australian passport holders..

korea eta australians

Travel to South Korea From Australia

You can use the K-ETA for Australian citizens to travel to South Korea from all major Australian cities .

Depending on the time of year, there are direct flights to Incheon International Airport (ICN) in Seoul from:

  • Gold Coast Airport (OOL) and
  • Melbourne International Airport (MLB)

There are also flights with 1 or more stops to Busan from Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney, and Adelaide .

Embassy subscription service for Australians visiting South Korea

Australians are advised to register with the embassy when traveling to South Korea .

As a subscriber you’ll receive travel advisory updates by email . This information can help you plan a safe trip to your South Korean destination. News updates are also sent out — get fully informed before you travel.

To opt in for this service, select the Embassy Registration option on the payment page when applying for your K-ETA.

Korean Embassy in Australia

If you apply for an electronic travel authorization for South Korea from Australia, you do not need to visit the embassy .

Only Australian citizens who need a visa to travel to South Korea need to go to a government office.

Find below the details of the South Korean Embassy in Canberra :

Address : 113 Empire Circuit. ACT 2600, Yarralumla, Canberra

FAQs about Australian Citizens Traveling to South Korea

Can australians go to south korea.

Australians can visit South Korea provided they have the relevant travel documents and meet the entry requirements.

Can Australians get a visa on arrival in South Korea?

No, visa on arrival services are not available for any nationality. Australians must obtain an ETA or a visa before arriving in South Korea.

Can Australians visit South Korea without a visa?

Australians can enter South Korea and stay for up to 90 days without a visa . However, they must have a valid ETA South Korea for Australians .

Can I travel from Australia to Jeju Island with the K-ETA?

Yes, you can use your K-ETA to travel to Jeju Island . The South Korea visa waiver for Australian citizens is valid for use across the whole of South Korea. There are domestic flights from Seoul to the island.

How long can an Australian citizen stay in South Korea?

You can stay in the country for up to 90 days with a South Korea visa waiver for Australian passport holders y. If you wish to stay for longer, you must obtain a South Korea visa for Australians instead.

How much is a South Korea Visa from Australia?

The online South Korea visa waiver for Australians is the most cost-effective way to gain entry into the country. Applicants pay the K-ETA fee securely online . You just need a debit or credit card that is authorized to make online payments.

How can you get a tourist visa for South Korea from Australia?

You do not need a visa to travel to South Korea from Australia for tourism. You can apply online for the ETA South Korea for Australians, which gives the holder visa-free access into the country for up to 90 days.

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South Korea

Travel Advisory July 24, 2023

South korea - level 1: exercise normal precautions.

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in South Korea.

Read the  country information page  for additional information on travel to South Korea.

If you decide to travel to South Korea:

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.   
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .   
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for South Korea.   
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest  Travel Health Information  related to your travel.   
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .    

Embassy Messages

View Alerts and Messages Archive

Quick Facts

Must be valid at time of entry

One page per stamp

No – From April 1, 2023, to December 31, 2024, the Korean Electronic Travel Authorization (K-ETA) is not required for US citizens traveling for short-term business or tourism purposes.

Embassies and Consulates

U.s. embassy seoul.

188 Sejong-daero, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03141, Korea Telephone: +(82) (2) 397-4114 (from within Korea, dial 02-397-4114)  DSN:721-4114 Fax: +(82) (2) 397-4101 Email:  [email protected]

U.S. Consulate in Busan

Lotte Gold Rose Building #612, Jungang-daero 993, Jin-gu Busan 47209, Korea Telephone: (+82) 51-863-0731 Email:  [email protected]

The Embassy and Consulate are closed on weekends and on  American and Korean holidays .  Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +82 (2) 397-4114.

Destination Description

Learn about the U.S. relationship to countries around the world.

Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

  • You must have a valid U.S. passport to enter Korea. From April 1, 2023, to December 31, 2024, the  Korean Electronic Travel Authorization (K-ETA)  is not required for US citizens for stays of 90 days or less that are for tourism or business purposes.
  • Visa required for all other purposes, including employment, teaching English, and for stays longer than 90 days.

Exceeding your authorized stay or not possessing a valid visa may result in detention and fines.

  • In the event of an overstay, apply for a visa extension from the  Korea Immigration Service (KIS)  before attempting to leave the country. Also consult with KIS regarding changes in visa category.

Military Personnel/DOD and their families on orders:

  • Consult  DOD Foreign Clearance Guide , and follow all instructions.
  • Enter Korea with DOD identification and travel orders.
  • Do not transit other countries such as China without a passport and appropriate visas.
  • Family Members/Dependents of Military Personnel/DOD on orders must present upon arrival passports valid for at least six months .

U.S. Government Executive Branch personnel on official business and DOD personnel assigned to the U.S. Embassy  (Including family members/dependents):

  • Employes assigned to Mission Korea should enter Korea with a diplomatic or official passport and a diplomatic or official Korean visa obtained through their sponsoring agency.  Check with your sponsoring agency about other requirements. 
  • TDY visitors traveling to Korea for up to 90 days on diplomatic or official passports do  not  require Korean visas and do  not  require a K-ETA. TDY visitors must obtain country clearance using  Department of State's eCC system  or  DOD APACS system .

HIV/AIDS Restriction:  The Department of State is unaware of any such entry restrictions for visitors or foreign residents in Korea.

  • Visit the  Embassy of Korea  website for current visa information. Please read our  Customs Information page .

COVID-19 Requirements :

  • There are no COVID-related entry requirements for U.S. citizens.
  • Travelers are encouraged to register their travel and health information through the Quarantine COVID19 Defence (Q-Code) system BEFORE traveling to Korea in order to streamline the airport arrival process.
  • Travel regulations and restrictions are subject to change, sometimes with little notice. You should review the information available on your nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate’s webpage before traveling.

Safety and Security

Public Demonstrations:  Demonstrations and rallies are common in South Korea, particularly near the U.S. Embassy, Seoul City Hall, and areas surrounding military installations. You should avoid areas where demonstrations are taking place and exercise caution in the vicinity of any large gatherings, protests, or rallies. Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence.

North Korea (The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, DPRK):  An armistice agreement, monitored by the United Nations, has maintained general peace on the Korean peninsula since 1953. Tensions occasionally flare up because of provocative acts by North Korea, including ballistic missile and nuclear tests and limited armed incursions into ROK-held territory. Some provocations have escalated into geographically limited skirmishes. South Korea routinely conducts military training exercises and civil defense drills. North Korea often issues strongly-worded and threatening messages, frequently in connection with these exercises. Please see our  Fact Sheet on North Korea .

Weather-related Events:  Heavy rains and flooding may occur during the June - August monsoon season or the May - November typhoon season. See general information about natural disaster preparedness at the U.S.  Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)  website.

Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program  ( STEP ):  To receive security messages by email and make it easier to locate you in an emergency, register in STEP. 

If the Embassy becomes aware of any specific and credible threat to the safety and security of U.S. citizens, we will inform you through our website, social media, and email.

Crime:  For most visitors, South Korea remains a very safe country. Common crimes occur more frequently in major metropolitan areas, tourist sites, and crowded markets.

  • Take routine safety precautions.
  • Pay attention to your surroundings.
  • Report any concerns to local police.

Violent crime is not common; however, remain vigilant:

  • Exercise caution in crowded entertainment, nightlife, and shopping districts.
  • If traveling at night, consider traveling in groups.
  • Use legitimate taxis or public transportation only.

Victims of Crime:  Call 112 for emergency assistance or to report a crime to local authorities. Call 02-397-4114 to contact the U.S. Embassy. We can:

  • Help you find appropriate medical care;
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to police;
  • Contact relatives or friends on your behalf;
  • Explain Korean judicial procedures in general terms;
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution;
  • Help you find accommodations and flight arrangements to the United States;
  • Replace a lost or stolen passport.

Sexual Assault:   The Embassy regularly receives reports of sexual assault from U.S. citizens. Most cases involved young women assaulted by acquaintances they met on social media, dating, or messaging apps. Alcohol is often involved, and Korea’s low overall crime can create a false sense of security.  Specialized hospital units and police are available in South Korea to assist victims, however services in English and responsiveness to the crime are not always consistent. In general, sex crimes are not punished as harshly in South Korea as in the United States and the road to prosecution is a challenging one for victims.

Domestic Violence:  Victim’s assistance resources or battered women’s shelters exist in Seoul and other urban areas but may be limited in rural areas. Most are government administered and require a police referral. Call 112 for emergency assistance or 1366 to reach Korea’s 24-hour domestic violence hotline. Victims may also contact the Embassy, tel. (+82) 2-397-4114.

Lost or Stolen Passports:  If your passport is stolen, file a report at the nearest police station.

Don't buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if widely available.  It is against South Korean law to purchase these goods and against U.S. law to bring them into the United States. The  Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Division in the U.S. Department of Justice  has more information.

Avoid fraud and scams:  See  Department of State  and  FBI  websites for more information.

Tourism:  The tourism industry is generally regulated and rules with regard to best practices and safety inspections are regularly enforced. Hazardous areas/activities are identified with appropriate signage and professional staff is typically on hand in support of organized activities. In the event of an injury, appropriate medical treatment is widely available throughout the country. Outside of a major metropolitan center, it may take more time for first responders and medical professionals to stabilize a patient and provide life-saving assistance. U.S. citizens are encouraged to purchase medical evacuation insurance. See our webpage for more information on  insurance providers for overseas coverage .

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  While in Korea, you are subject to local laws. If you violate Korean laws, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Be aware that:

  • Immigration violations can lead to arrest, fines, and deportation.
  • There is little tolerance for illegal drugs.
  • If you mail illegal drugs to/ from Korea, you will be prosecuted.
  • Commercial disputes may lead to criminal charges being filed under local laws.

Be aware that some crimes are prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on  crimes against minors abroad  and the  Department of Justice  website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask officials to notify the Embassy. See our  webpage  for further information.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES

Dual Nationality and Military Conscription:  Dual national males (including U.S. service members) may be subject to compulsory military service. If you have family ties to South Korea, consult the nearest Korean Embassy or Consulate or the  Korean Military Manpower Administration  regarding potential citizenship obligations  before entering South Korea .

Passport Seizures and Exit Bans:  If you are involved in a criminal investigation or commercial dispute, authorities may seize your passport and/or block your departure. While we may reissue a passport, we cannot lift an exit ban.

Exit Permits:  Exit permits are not generally required. However, if a parent requests a travel restriction on his/her child, Korean authorities may prevent that child from departing even when traveling with the other parent. As of June 1, 2020, foreigners who are long-term residents of the ROK are required to obtain a re-entry permit four business days prior to departure from Korea. The permits are available online through an e-application at the  www.hikorea.go.kr  website.

International Child Abduction:  See our website for information related to the  prevention of international child abduction . 

Working in South Korea:  If working, including teaching or modeling, you must enter with the appropriate work visa. It is not possible to change your visa status without leaving the country. If you begin work without the appropriate visa, you may be arrested, fined, and/or deported. If you are working without a valid work permit and get into a contractual dispute with your employer, you have little legal recourse.

Students:  See our  Students Abroad  page and  FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for  Women Travelers .

ROK National Security Law:  Authorities may detain, arrest, and imprison persons believed to have committed acts intended to endanger the “security of the state,” including statements deemed to praise the political system and/or officials of the DPRK. 

Customs Regulations: There is strict enforcement of regulations on importing and exporting items such as firearms, narcotics and prescription drugs, non-prescription health supplements, radio equipment, and gold. Importation of materials deemed to be obscene, subversive, or harmful to the public peace is also restricted.

  • Amphetamines are illegal in Korea. Do not bring amphetamines or other prescription narcotics into the country without obtaining advance permission in writing from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety. See the  U.S. Embassy Seoul, Health Information page .
  • Traveling with Pets: See  Korea’s Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency  website.

See the  Korean Customs Regulations website for complete information.

LGBTI Travelers:  Consensual same-sex sexual activity is not criminalized. Korea is a conservative country in regards to LGBTI issues. However, there are an increasing number of LGBTI-oriented clubs, festivals and NGOs advocating for LGBTI issues. The ROK National Human Rights Commission Act prohibits discrimination against individuals because of their sexual orientation, but there are no laws specifying punishment for persons found to have discriminated on this basis. Same-sex marriages are not recognized. Korean citizens can legally change their gender identity.

See   our  LGBTI Travel Information  page and section 6 of the  Department of State's Human Rights report  for further details.

Mobility Issues:  Korean law mandates access to transportation, communication, and public buildings. Cross walks typically have audio and visual signals. Older buildings and streets are generally less accessible than modern ones. Metro cars and buses in Seoul offer priority seating for the disabled and most metro stations have elevators. Metro platforms include Korean Braille information. Contact individual bus companies and subway associations for specific information. Foreign residents are eligible for disability assistance from local ward offices; assistance varies by ward.

Quality of Care : Western-style medical facilities are available in most large cities. However, not all doctors and staff, are proficient in English. A  list of hospitals  and medical specialists who speak English is available on our website. For emergency ambulance service dial 119. Ambulance services are widely available. For information on medical evacuation from South Korea, please see the State Department’s brochure on  Air Ambulance/MedEvac/Medical Escort Providers . 

We do not pay medical bills.  Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. Verify your health insurance coverage before traveling overseas. See our webpage for information on  insurance providers for overseas coverage . In most cases, health care providers will require payment in advance of treatment or will not release a patient until hospital bills are paid. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to include coverage for medical evacuation.

Medication:  Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. Most prescription medications, except psychotropic types, can be obtained at Korean pharmacies (brand names often differ). Local pharmacies will require a prescription from a Korean doctor.

Update  vaccinations  recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

For further health information go to:

  • World Health Organization
  • U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC)

COVID-19 Testing:

  • Travelers should contact Korean local health providers to determine the location of testing facilities within Korea. A non-comprehensive list of some COVID-19 testing facilities can be found on the  Embassy website .

COVID-19 Vaccines:

  • The COVID-19 vaccine is   available for U.S. citizen residents in Korea.
  • Review the Korean government’s  Vaccination Guide for Foreign Nationals in Korea  and  COVID-19 Booster Shot Guideline for Foreign Nationals  on COVID-19 vaccinations in Korea.
  • Visit the FDA's website to  learn more about FDA-approved vaccines  in the United States. 

Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Roads are well-paved, traffic signals functional, and most drivers comply with basic traffic laws. South Korea has a significantly higher traffic fatality rate than the United States. Causes of accidents include excessive speed, frequent lane changes without signaling, running red lights, aggressive bus drivers, and weaving motorcyclists. It is recommended that you photo document any traffic accidents.

Be aware that motorcyclists may drive on sidewalks, and drivers do not always yield to pedestrians in marked crosswalks.

Traffic Laws include:

  • International driving permit (or ROK license) is required for all drivers.
  • Left-hand turns prohibited except with green arrow.
  • Seat belts and car seats are mandatory.
  • Motorcycle passengers must wear helmets.
  • Automobile drivers are presumed to have some fault in accidents involving pedestrians.
  • Expect long waits at police stations while police investigate any incidents.
  • Police may take your passport or detain you during an investigation.
  • Even if negligence is not proven, criminal charges may be filed.
  • Blood-alcohol content of 0.03% or higher is considered legally intoxicated.
  • Police regularly set up DUI checkpoints. Drivers are required to submit to breathalyzer tests; refusal can result in cancellation of your license.

For information about driver's permits, vehicle inspection, road tax, and mandatory insurance, refer to our  Road Safety page . You may also visit the  Korea Tourism Organization (KTO) website.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:  The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of the Republic of Korea's Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of the ROK's air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the  FAA's Safety Assessment Page .

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to South Korea should check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at the U.S. Department of Transportation’s  Maritime Security Communications with Industry Web Portal . Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website  and as a broadcast warning on the  National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s website .

For additional travel information

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)  to receive security messages and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Call us in Washington, D.C. at 1-888-407-4747 (toll-free in the United States and Canada) or 1-202-501-4444 (from all other countries) from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).
  • See the  State Department’s travel website  for the  Worldwide Caution  and  Travel Advisories .
  • Follow us on  Twitter  and  Facebook .
  • See  traveling safely abroad  for useful travel tips.

South Korea was cited in the State Department’s 2022 Annual Report to Congress on International Child Abduction for demonstrating a pattern of non-compliance with respect to international parental child abduction. Review information about International Parental Child Abduction in  South Korea.  For additional IPCA-related information, please see the  International Child Abduction Prevention and Return Act ( ICAPRA )  report.

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  • Destinations

World’s biggest spokeless Ferris wheel ride to be built in South Korea

The gigantic 180 metre structure will carry 1,400 people per ride and be connected to a zip line and subway station.

The Seoul Twin Eye will be situated in Peace Park, on the edge of the Han River. Picture: UNStudio/Supplied

Urgent new warning for Bali tourists

Wildly popular Bali attraction exposed

Wildly popular Bali attraction exposed

Tourists ‘cancel’ Bali after seeing this video

Tourists ‘cancel’ Bali after seeing this video

The world’s biggest spokeless Ferris wheel ride that dwarfs the London Eye and even outsizes some of Dubai’s attractions will be built in South Korea.

Consisting of two intersecting rings and revolving pods that offer superb 360 degree views of the surrounding area, the Seoul Twin Eye will be able to carry more than 1,400 people simultaneously.

It will also boast a 180 metre diameter, accommodating 64 pods that can hold up to 25 visitors at once.

The Seoul Twin Eye will be situated in Peace Park, on the edge of the Han River. Picture: UNStudio/Supplied

Unlike a traditional Ferris wheel in which the entire wheel spins, Seoul’s version will see pods move as part of a track-based system that pulls them around inside and outside the rings.

Slated for 2028, the structure is said to be the first of its kind and has a capacity nearly double that of the 135 metre tall London Eye, according to its architects, UNStudio.

The groundbreaking plans, estimated to cost US$769.28 million ($1.1 billion), were revealed by the Dutch architecture firm, which collaborated with UK-based Arup and South Korea’s Heerim Architects on the project.

Sat on top of a 40m-high cultural complex, it will reach a staggering 180 metres – making it taller than the London Eye. Picture: UNStudio/Supplied

In plans released on UNStudio’s website , the firm said “The UNStudio team focused on the concept of unity as a symbol for the design.

“The wheel is inspired by the Honcheonsigye, an astronomical clock that represents the movement of celestial objects through time.

“The double ring structure of the ‘Seoul Twin Eye’ provides both stability and a unique aesthetic.

The Seoul Twin Eye will contain 64 pods that can hold up to 25 visitors at once. Picture: UNStudio/Supplied

“UNStudio teamed up with Arup, who reviewed the proposed structure’s earthquake and wind resistance, for the recently unveiled vision proposal.”

Elsewhere, an architect has revealed his ambitious plan to develop a “space elevator” capable of transporting humans to space.

The object, dubbed Ascensio, would comprise a long cable tethering an asteroid trapped in geosynchronous orbit to a floating platform back on Earth.

And a futuristic aeroplane promises to revolutionise short-haul flying with cheaper and cleaner trips.

Dubbed the Octoplane, the all-electric aircraft has eight battery-powered props and could take you all the way to Switzerland without a drop of fuel.

World’s other weirdest rides

Off the back of UNStudio’s groundbreaking plans to build the world’s tallest Ferris wheel, here are some other quirky rides from around the world.

Aizhai suspension bridge The longest valley suspension bridge in the world – stretching 335 metres above the ground – offers stunning views between Chongqing to Changsha in southwest China. But for around $440, people can attach themselves to a rope and throw themselves off it – plunging themselves into the valley below.

Located at Busch Gardens Tampa Bay in Florida, the Iron Gwazi is the world’s “steepest and fastest” hybrid rollercoaster. Standing at just under 63 metres, the ride has a 91-degree drop and reaches terrifying speeds of 122kmph, while riders drift out of their seat mid-air.

Aizhai – the world's highest suspension bridge – offers both stunning views and adrenaline-fuelled leaps for $290. Picture: iStock

Hundeprutterutchenbane Located at Bonbon Land in Denmark, the Hundeprutterutchenbane ride is based off a farting dog. Better known as the “farting dog switchback”, the mutt’s flatulence is said to “add extra speed to the ride”.

More Coverage

travel to australia from south korea

Known as the largest wooden rollercoaster in the world, Zadra features a 1315 metre wood and steel track. Found at Energylandia in Poland, a scary 61 metre drop is situated at the beginning of the ride, with passengers reaching heights of 64 metres and top speeds of up to 117kmph.

This article originally appeared on The Sun and was reproduced with permission.

It’s Australia’s most popular holiday destination, but a fresh warning has been issued for travellers to exercise a high degree of caution.

Most Aussies go here when they go to Bali but there’s a big problem with Ubud’s most popular attraction.

This viral video is making TikTok users scratch Bali from their travel lists – claiming it’s the stuff of nightmares.

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South Korea Travel Restrictions

Traveller's COVID-19 vaccination status

Travelling from Australia to South Korea

Open for vaccinated visitors

COVID-19 testing

Not required

Not required for vaccinated visitors

Restaurants

Not required in public spaces and public transportation.

Documents & Additional resources

Ready to travel, find flights to south korea, find stays in south korea, explore more countries on travel restrictions map, destinations you can travel to now, netherlands, new zealand, philippines, south korea, united arab emirates, united kingdom, united states, know when to go.

Sign up for email alerts as countries begin to open - choose the destinations you're interested in so you're in the know.

Can I travel to South Korea from Australia?

Most visitors from Australia, regardless of vaccination status, can enter South Korea.

Can I travel to South Korea if I am vaccinated?

Fully vaccinated visitors from Australia can enter South Korea without restrictions.

Can I travel to South Korea without being vaccinated?

Unvaccinated visitors from Australia can enter South Korea without restrictions.

Do I need a COVID test to enter South Korea?

Visitors from Australia are not required to present a negative COVID-19 PCR test or antigen result upon entering South Korea.

Can I travel to South Korea without quarantine?

Travellers from Australia are not required to quarantine.

Do I need to wear a mask in South Korea?

Mask usage in South Korea is not required in public spaces and public transportation.

Are the restaurants and bars open in South Korea?

Restaurants in South Korea are open. Bars in South Korea are .

  • International edition
  • Australia edition
  • Europe edition

The Socceroos were left to rue missed chances and naive challenges after Son Heung-min inspired another dramatic Korean comeback

  • 6d ago Full time: Australia 1-2 South Korea
  • 6d ago Half time in extra time: Australia 1-2 South Korea
  • 6d ago O'Neill is sent off!
  • 6d ago GOAL! Australia 1-2 South Korea (Son 104)
  • 6d ago Full time: Australia 1-1 South Korea
  • 6d ago GOAL! Australia 1-1 South Korea (Hwang 90+6 pen)
  • 6d ago Half time: Australia 1-0 South Korea
  • 6d ago GOAL! Australia 1-0 South Korea (Goodwin 42)
  • 6d ago Team news: Goodwin in for Bos
  • 6d ago Preamble

Son Heung-min scores in extra time to put South Korea on the brink of the semi-final and break Australian hearts.

You should probably go back to bed , and I should probably wrap this blog up. Commiserations to Socceroos fans, and thanks for your company throughout their campaign; congratulations to South Korea’s unconquerable optimists. Bye!

It must be a weird experience preparing a composite image like this ahead of a game you are desperate for your country to win.

It wasn’t the the ending we imagined or wanted. Thank you Australia for your support throughout the @afcasiancup ! 💚💛 #Socceroos #AsianCup2023 #DifferentBreed pic.twitter.com/jlpfKWqdO5 — Subway Socceroos (@Socceroos) February 2, 2024

South Korea’s run in this tournament is starting to evoke Ken Doherty’s run to the final of the 2003 World Snooker Championship . In the sphere of dramatic comebacks, there’s no higher praise than that.

✨ 𝐒𝐄𝐌𝐈-𝐅𝐈𝐍𝐀𝐋𝐈𝐒𝐓𝐒 ✨ ❗Never. Say. Never. They just keep on doing it! 🇰🇷 Korea Republic are heading into the semi-finals. #AsianCup2023 | #HayyaAsia pic.twitter.com/HYkE3BBBMV — #AsianCup2023 (@afcasiancup) February 2, 2024

Match report: Australia 1-2 South Korea (aet)

By the end, all the key stats were in South Korea’s favour

Possession 73-27

Shots on target 9-5

But most of those shots on target came in extra time when Australia had nothing left. Had Australia won 1-0 or 2-0 it would have been a textbook rope-a-dope victory.

“Although Arnie’s decision to bring on Miller proved catastrophic, it was his faith in the normally reliable twin pillars of Duke and Souttar that did for him in the end,” says Chris Paraskevas. “While Souttar was desperately nursed back to match fitness, it was perhaps 45 minutes too late, his legs giving way a little early tonight. The preference for Duke was understandable - strong, selfless, good in the air - but he looked out of sorts in this tournament (and especially tonight) and isn’t mobile or clinical enough. Aa penny for Jamie McClaren’s thoughts.

“Maybe this is the game that epitomised the positives and limitations of Arnold’s tactical style: his Socceroos will always give you a game, but when required... they simply aren’t set-up to run the game. Nonetheless... you feel for him.”

Quite. Despite watching all five games in this tournament, I still don’t know whether he’s shackling a potentially good team or getting the best out of a limited one. I guess we’ll find out under the next manager.

Craig Goodwin, whose fine volley put Australia ahead, gives his reaction

It’s pure disappointment at the moment. We’re one minute away from going through. We had chances to put the game away in the second half; there were a few times we should have scored the second goal. There’s nothing but disappointment at the moment. To be honest, I don’t know what to say. Korea are a great team with great players and we gave them opportunities from set-pieces that we didn’t need to. For [Lewis Miller], it’s a learning curve – not just for him, for anyone. He’s unlucky to give away the penalty, because I thought it was one that could have gone the other way. It’s done now. We’re disappointed and that’s it.

When the immediate pain starts to abate, Australia will reflect on a strange tournament. They were never convincing in attack, yet they were two minutes of injury-time away from reaching a very winnable semi-final.

South Korea will play Jordan in the semi-final after another improbable comeback. The Australian players look devastated: they gave everything they had, and it was this close to being enough. But Son Heung-min - who is on his haunches, haemorrhaging tears of joy - bent the game to his will and his skill. He forced an injury-time penalty, converted nervelessly by Hwang Hee-chan, and scored the winner in extra-time with a majestic free-kick.

Full time: Australia 1-2 South Korea

120+1 min Hong shoots over from 15 yards, then Jeong Seung-hyeon comes on for the impressive Lee Kang-in.

120 min Just one minute of added time. Australia have nothing left.

119 min: Outstanding double save by Ryan! How are Australia still alive? South Korea broke four on three, with Son on the ball. He played in Seol (I think), whose stinging shot was beaten away by Ryan. leaping to his left. The ball ran loose and Ryan sprang to his feet to block the follow-up shot on the line.

118 min The outstanding left-back Seol Young-woo finds the energy to run 70 yards and kill a bit more time. Bos comes across to make a fine tackle and win a free-kick.

117 min Football is a perverse old game, so an Australian equaliser isn’t beyond the realms. But right now it looks extremely unlikely; their ten men just can’t keep the ball.

115 min Oh Hyeon-gyu fresh-airs an attempted volley from Yang Hyun-jun’s superb cross. An Australian defender, Burgess I think, did well to put him under pressure sa the ball came in.

114 min Behich is furious after being wrongly penalised for handball. He was in a decent position on the left-wing as well.

113 min: Chance for Son! South Korea break three on two, with Australia’s defenders looking very weary. It’s played to the right for Son, who drags a low shot wide of the far post from the edge of the area. For him, though not everyone, that’s a pretty good chance.

Son Heung-min misses a chance

112 min “Slept through my alarm and only saw the last 15 minutes but I saw that coming from 90 minutes away,” says James Paraskevas. “Classic Graham Arnold defending on a lead. Was always going to happen? Miller thinks he’s playing for St Mirren against Falkirk on a wet and windy Sunday afternoon - what was he thinking?”

It’s easy for me to say, as I’m not invested, but if Miller doesn’t make that tackle or Duke scores one of his two chances, I think it would be seen as a superb performance tactically – an homage to those old Mourinho masterclasses.

111 min Son Heung-min, for whom the word indefatigable might have been invented – I bet he doesn’t drink Carling Black Label - whips a curler from 25 yards that is too close to Ryan.

Carling Black Label advert

109 min No sign of Australia generating any attacking momentum. They just haven’t recovered from the hamemr blow of Hwang’s injury-time equaliser.

108 min “Not only did Australia have 48 hours extra rest, but Korea went an extra 30 minutes on Tuesday,” says Joe Pearson. “They should be Luka Modric-level tired.”

This game has been a good advert for letting the ball do the work. The margins are gossamer-thin, though. Had Miller not made that tackle in injury time, Australia would have been deserved winners. Since then, they’ve been overwhelmed to such an extent that it’s hard to argue against South Korea being the better team overall.

107 min Australia have switched to a 4-3-2 formation with Harry Souttar in the Robert Huth role up front.

106 min Peep peep!

Double substitution for South Korea Oh Hyeon-gyu and Park Jin-seop come on for Park Yong-woo and Hwang Hee-chan.

Half time in extra time: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Australia were 1-0 up after 95 minutes of normal time. Now they are a goal and a man down after a chastening first period of extra-time. South Korea dominated throughout and took the lead through a terrific free-kick from Son Heung-min. If that was bad enough, Aiden O’Neill’s red card has left the Socceroos needing a minor miracle.

O'Neill is sent off!

105+5 min Australia are down to 10 men; Hwang pumps the air in celebration. O’Neill wasn’t happy with the yellow card, but he keeps his counsel as he walks off the field.

Aiden O'Neill receives a red card for leaving one on Hwang.

105+3 min It’s still being checked, and the player – it was Hwang Hee-chan – is still down. In the Premier League that would be a red card, because his studs plunged into Hwang’s ankle. The referee is going to the monitor.

105+1 min O’Neill is booked for a crunching challenge on … I’m not sure who it was actually. He won the ball but was penalised for an aggressive follow-through, and there’s a VAR check for a possible red card .

105 min Australia look broken. I really feel for Lewis Miller, who conceded the penalty and the free-kick that led to both goals.

For 90+4 minutes , Son Heung-min was a relatively peripheral figure in this game. Then he won a penalty to keep South Korea in the competition, and now he has put them in front! It was a superb free-kick, clipped over the wall towards the near post. Ryan flew across his goal and got a hand to the ball but could only help it into the net.

Could Ryan have done better? Not with the save, maybe with his positioning because it wasn’t right in the corner. But it was a beautiful free-kick, curled over the ball with enough dip to make the save extremely difficult for Ryan.

GOAL! Australia 1-2 South Korea (Son 104)

Magnificent!

Son Heung-min scores a magnificent free-kick for South Korea.

102 min Miller trips Hwang just outside the area, a foul for which he might have been booked. The free-kick is a fair way to the left of centre, though not enough to rule out a shot from Son…

101 min “As a Wolves fan I’m delighted that Hwang Hee-chan put away that last-minute penalty, as I was very nervous for him when you said that he would be taking it,” writes Chris Redston. “Some fans want countries with players of their Premier League team to go out early, so they can come back to play for their clubs, but I’m delighted that Channy has kept Korea in the match and hope he goes on to score the winner in the final. He’s a lovely, humble guy and deserves all the success he can get for his country.”

The dominant attitude towards Afcon and the Asian Cup , certainly in England, has a whiff of something not entirely fragrant.

  • South Korea
  • Australia sport

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Everything you need to know before traveling to South Korea

Charles Usher

Jul 16, 2022 • 10 min read

Cherry blossoms in spring at Seoul Forest public park.

Time your visit to South Korea with the trees: the most pleasant moments of the year to visit coincide with spring cherry blossoms and fall foliage © Namo Akkharasit / Shutterstock

Has any country gained as much cachet in recent years as South Korea ?

Once overlooked by travelers headed to its bigger East Asian neighbors, the country is turning into an obsession for many, thanks to its cutting-edge technology, trendy cuisine, the world’s biggest pop bands and some of the most exciting movies and TV series being made anywhere. 

Add to all this centuries of tradition and copious natural blessings, all in a country scarcely larger than Ireland, and you’ve got one of the planet’s great travel destinations.

Safe, friendly and possessing superb infrastructure, this is a truly easy – not to mention rewarding – place to explore. Read on for tips to make your visit even easier: all you need to know before your trip to South Korea.

Complete your pre-trip registration 3 days before your flight

Most travelers – including citizens of the US, Australia and the UK – can visit South Korea visa-free for up to 90 days (up to six months for Canadians). However, you’ll still need to apply for a Korea Electronic Travel Authorization on the K-ETA website at least 72 hours before departure. It’s a simple process, and your K-ETA is valid for two years from the date of approval.

Time your visit with the trees

We recommending planning your visit to South Korea for spring or fall, when the peninsula gets its most temperate weather. Bonus points if you can time it to coincide with one of the country’s two periods of arboreal magic. Korea’s cherry blossoms start blooming in mid-March on Jeju-do Island , off the south coast, and typically appear in Seoul in early April. In late October and early November, the leaves of Korea’s many ancient ginkgo trees turn into brilliant golden torches, giving Seoul and other cities a particularly regal look for several weeks.

Mind these two major holidays

The two periods that can cause travelers real problems are the multi-day Lunar New Year and Chuseok (fall harvest) holidays, when Koreans hit the road en masse, making booking a bus or train ticket nearly impossible. The dates change each year, so be sure to check when these are before making travel plans. 

If you can’t avoid a holiday, base yourself in Seoul or Busan for its duration. Plenty of businesses stay open, and the cities can be surprisingly peaceful with everyone out of town.

Use common sense and keep these numbers handy, just in case

Theft and violent crime are rare in South Korea. Scams and pickpockets targeting travelers are virtually nonexistent, and Koreans typically go out of their way to be hospitable to visitors. Nonetheless, as should anywhere, exercise basic caution and common sense. Korea has strict drug laws, and don’t even think about trying to sneak past them. Nightlife often revolves around heavy drinking, so know your limit to avoid putting yourself in a sketchy situation.

If you do have an emergency, call 112 to reach the police, 119 for emergency services or 1330 to reach the Korea Travel Hotline, where an operator will connect you to the appropriate service and serve as an interpreter. That number can also be used to reach the Korea Tourist Police.

A woman in business attire bows on bridge in Gangnam, Seoul, South Korea

Be ready to get personal

The typical greeting here is a quick bow – nothing dramatic, just a head nod deep enough for your gaze to meet the floor – but you’ll sometimes be offered a handshake instead. If you are, expect more of a gentle clasp than the old squeeze-and-pump.

You’ll likely be asked questions more personal than you’re accustomed to by someone you just met. At the top of this list is your age. This data point is essential to Koreans, as it informs how they talk to one another: how formal their verb endings should be and whether to use honorifics. Inquiries about marital status, occupation and your opinion of Korea are also common. Answer politely, and feel free to return the question.

Is North Korea a concern?

Despite international headlines, South Koreans don’t worry about an attack from  North Korea  – and neither should you. Military clashes are very rare, and danger to civilians is rarer still. A guided tour to the  DMZ can be a fascinating and truly nowhere-else experience. From afar, North Korea can seem almost comical in its eccentricities, but when you’re looking at South Korean soldiers looking at North Korean soldiers looking at you, the geopolitical stakes hit different. Plus, many tours offer what may be your only chance to actually step foot in the world’s most secretive country.

Monitor the air quality

Even in COVID-free times, it’s a good idea to always carry a mask as air quality can occasionally drop to pretty nasty levels. This is especially true in spring, when dust blown off the deserts of Mongolia and northern China combines with local pollution to create unhealthy air. Download an app like IQAir Air Visual (for iOS or Android ) to keep track of current conditions and the upcoming forecast across the country.

Wear what you like, but don’t pack anything too risqué

As a traveler, you can feel free to dress for the weather and comfort. Koreans are pretty relaxed about attire, even if they’re more modest than you might expect. If visiting a temple , while shorts are fine, tank tops and miniskirts are not. Both men and women frequently wear t-shirts at the beach, and it’s best to leave the Speedo or thong at home. Korean women almost never wear low-cut tops, and female travelers could find that doing so brings unwelcome looks. Tattoos are now common among young people, yet even still some bathhouses will deny entry if you have any ink.

Learn your ga , na , da , ra , ma , bas

Basic English is widely understood in Korea by folks under 50, and signage is almost always in both Korean and English. Yet it’s still a good (and respectful) idea to learn a bit of the language. 

Beyond memorizing a few essential Korean words and phrases, learning hangul, the Korean alphabet, is like gaining access to a secret bonus level of Korean travel. If you can sound out the letters, you’ll find that you already know what things like 카페 모카 ( ka-pe mo-ka ), 비빔밥 (bibimbap) and 사우나 ( sa-oo-na ) are. 

Hangul is easy to learn. King Sejong the Great, who oversaw its creation in the 15th century, declared that a wise man could pick it up before noon and even an idiot could learn it in 10 days.  Let’s Learn Hangul  teaches the Korean alphabet in an interactive, easy-to-follow way.

A conductor stands on a platform in front of a train in a station, Seoul, South Korea

Take advantage of Korea’s world-class public transportation

Korea’s subways, trains and buses are clean, convenient and efficient. It can sometimes seem like a new station is added to the Seoul metro every month, and the rail and intercity bus networks will take you to every corner of the country. Public transportation is cheap: bus and subway fares in Seoul start at just ₩1250. In all of South Korea, Jeju-do is the only place where renting a car might make sense, and even there it’s probably not necessary.

With plentiful English information and sensible design, public transportation in Korea makes getting from here to there a breeze. To get moving, start by picking up a T-money transit card at a convenience store or from a vending machine in any subway station. Separate kiosks can be used to load money onto your card. Tap your card both when you board and get off the subway or bus. Fares are calculated by distance, so if you forget to tap when disembarking, you’ll be charged more and won’t be able to transfer for free. You can also use T-money cards in most taxis.

When traveling longer distances, it’s simple enough to just buy intercity bus or train tickets at stations. For the high-speed KTX train and some of the more popular routes and times – departing Seoul on Saturday morning, for example – it’s a good idea to purchase in advance. Bus tickets are typically readily available for purchase from machines and counters in bus stations. Buy train tickets on the website of KORAIL , the national railway operator.

Stay connected with these essential apps

Wi-fi is so prevalent in Korean cities that you can do without a local SIM card, but if you decide that you want one just in case, or if you plan to head to rural areas, the easiest place to pick one up is at one of the many  telecom roaming centers at Incheon Airport upon arrival. You can also rent a phone if you didn’t bring your own.

Helpful apps to download include Naver Map ( iOS and Android ), which works better than Google Maps in South Korea; MangoPlate ( iOS and Android ) for finding restaurants and cafes; Subway Korea for navigating cities’ metro systems; and Kakao T ( iOS and Android ), which is like Uber but for taxis.

A diner with chopsticks reaches for meat on the grill at a barbecue restaurant, Seoul, South Korea

Eat with others and don’t be afraid to shout for service

Eating is a communal activity in Korea, and many restaurants, especially barbecue joints, don’t offer single servings. So if you’re traveling solo, you might either have to drag someone from your hostel along with you (not a tough sell) or loosen your belt and order pork belly for two (poor thing).

At restaurants, waiters won’t come check up on you, and most places have call buttons on each table. Give it a push, and someone will be right over. Otherwise, to grab the waitstaff’s attention, raise your hand and shout, “ Yogiyo !” (“Over here!”) Water is usually self-service, and occasionally side dishes are, too. If your server doesn’t set a bottle of water on your table, look around for a water dispenser and stacks of metal cups. At the end of your meal, take the check to the front counter to pay. There’s no tipping.

You might have to be flexible about your diet

If you have food allergies or a specific diet, you may have a hard time finding places to eat or getting clear information about ingredients. Vegetarianism and veganism are slowly gaining popularity in Korea, but not many restaurants cater to these diets. Even dishes that you might think are vegetarian are often made with anchovy broth or fermented shrimp.  

Recognize that LGBTQI+ acceptance still has a long way to go 

While attitudes are slowly changing, Korea remains a conservative society in many respects, and anti-LGBTQI+ prejudice is common. Even so, LGBTQI+ travelers are more likely to be on the receiving end of curious – if misinformed – questions than any sort of open hostility. Public displays of affection are generally frowned upon – though this goes for straight couples too.

Seoul has small gay districts in Itaweon and Jongno-3-ga, while the Hongdae-Sinchon-Ewha university corridor is another place where LGBTQI+ Koreans feel comfortable being themselves. 

Women separate wheat in a field in rural South Korea

Get out of town

There are two Koreas. We don’t mean North and South, but rather Seoul and everything else – or, a bit more broadly, urban Korea and rural Korea. The country has a reputation for being a hyper-paced, highly wired pop-culture dynamo, but its hinterlands present a much different picture, and you’d be missing out big time if you skip them. 

The Korean countryside is beautiful, mountains and rivers  make for beautiful vistas, and life is lived differently here than in the cities. The population is older – most people under 40 have decamped to the cities – and the pace is slower. At least once on your trip, get out of the cities and immerse yourself in this more traditional side of Korea.

Roll with the nudges

Koreans live life in a hurry, and they do so in a densely populated country, so you shouldn’t expect the same sense of personal space or public courtesies you find in your home country. Koreans won’t hold doors open for you or apologize if they bump into you when walking. When getting on or off the subway, they likely won’t say, “Excuse me” – they’ll just nudge you aside. They’re not being rude, though. 

When you live in a city as crowded as Seoul, it’s just not practical to say sorry every time you knock shoulders with someone – you’d be apologizing constantly. This can be maddening to outsiders, but just accept it and roll with the nudges.

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Australia vs South Korea 1-2: Asian Cup 2023 quarterfinal – as it happened

All the updates as South Korea came back to beat Australia in the second quarterfinal of the AFC Asian Cup 2023.

This page is now closed. Thank you for joining us. These were the updates as South Korea beat Australia at the AFC Asian Cup on Friday, February 2:

  • South Korea beat Australia 2-1 after extra-time in the second quarterfinal of the AFC Asian Cup 2023 at Al Janoub Stadium in Al Wakrah, Qatar, to set up a semifinal with Jordan.
  • Hwang Hee-chan scored a nerveless late equaliser from the penalty spot for South Korea before Son Heung-min got the winner with a spectacular free kick, as South Korea pulled off another late escape.
  • Earlier on Friday, Jordan booked their ticket to the last four by beating Tajikistan 1-0.
  • Live updates
  • Match stats

It’s a wrap!

That’s it from our live coverage of Australia vs South Korea. Thank for you joining us.

This is Manasi Pathak, on behalf of Al Jazeera, signing off for the night. See you soon!

More to come from Al Jazeera

Today’s action from the AFC Asian Cup has ended, but there is still some live football happening elsewhere.

Head to our live coverage of Nigeria vs Angola in the Africa Cup of Nations quarterfinals .

Relentless South Korea

South Korea have only won ONE MATCH in regular time at the Asian Cup. They’ve just made it to the semifinals 🇰🇷👏 Comeback kings 👑 pic.twitter.com/F6zc5ocg5C — ESPN FC (@ESPNFC) February 2, 2024

South Korea pull off another heist

Hafsa Adil

Al Wakrah, Qatar

This has been an incredible turnaround, second time in a row by the Taeguek Warriors. The players were relentless in their pursuit of an equaliser and, willed on by their fans, found it in the end.

The Aussies ran out of steam as soon as extra-time got under way.

Their players were a picture of despair at full-time, while Koreans looked relieved to have pulled off another heist.

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Jordan vs South Korea in semifinals

The first semifinal of the AFC Asian Cup will feature Jordan vs South Korea.

Earlier today, Jordan booked their ticket to the last four by beating Tajikistan 1-0 in regulation time.

Son leads South Korea to semifinals!

⏰ AET | 🇦🇺 Australia 1️⃣-2️⃣ Korea Republic 🇰🇷 Another moment of sheer brilliance from none other than Son Heung-min as Korea Republic continue their passage into the Last 4! #AsianCup2023 | #HayyaAsia | #AUSvKOR pic.twitter.com/GLvLOKJAMb — #AsianCup2023 (@afcasiancup) February 2, 2024

Full time: South Korea beat Australia 2-1!

South Korea have done it again!

They have come from a goal down to beat Australia in the quarterfinals in extra time.

Goodwin gave Australia the lead in the first half, but Hwang scored a penalty late in stoppage time to secure the equaliser. In extra time, Son’s sensational free kick secured their fate, as South Korea qualified for the semifinals.

What a night for the South Koreans!

Ryan saves thrice!

Australia keeper Ryan pulls off a series of saves to deny South Korea! He keeps out three attempts!

120 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

South Korea put up commendable display

South Korea have shown great mental and physical strength tonight.

For the second time in a row, they have fought back from a goal down.

Can they go on to defeat Australia? Just a few minutes remaining now.

117 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Son misses again

Son has a chance once again to find the net, but his shot drags wide of the goal.

What a miss.

114 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Aussie fans look glum

It’s quiet in the Australian section at Al Janoub Stadium. The young Socceroos supporters range from glum to heartbroken.

Can their heroes find a way to equalise in the last eight minutes?

Son shoots wide

Son takes a shot from distance, but Australia keeper Ryan comfortably collects it.

112 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Australia tweak formation

With a man down, Australia have switched to a 4-3-2 formation with Souttar in the Robert Huth role up front.

Can they inspire an equaliser here?

110 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Second half of extra time begins

After a brief break, the second half of extra-time begins.

In case you have just joined us, South Korea are leading 2-1 against Australia in this quarterfinal, with 15 minutes of extra-time pending.

106 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

End of first half of extra time

It’s the end of the first half of extra-time and South Korea have succeeded in pulling off a comeback!

Son’s sensational free kick keeps them 2-1 ahead, with 15 minutes of regulation time pending in this high-octane contest.

O’Neill sent off, Australia down to 10

O’Neill is sent off for catching the ankle of South Korea’s Hwang with his studs! The referee initially showed O’Neill a yellow but changed it to a red following a quick VAR check.

Australia are now down to 10 men and in enormous trouble.

105+ 4 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Fans hail Son

It’s hard to tell if the crowd was more thrilled about the goal or the scorer.

You could hear the noise all the way back in Doha when Son’s name was announced on the PA.

They had been singing his name all night and he finally delivered what could prove to be South Korea’s most important goal of the tournament yet.

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

GOAL! Son puts South Korea 2-1 up!

South Korea have a free kick near the edge of the box, and Son bends it into the net!

South Korea have come from behind to lead!

104 mins: Australia 1-2 South Korea

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Under the cosh

South Korea have found an extra gear since that equaliser and are keeping the ball in the Australian half for long periods of play.

Meanwhile, Australia look like they will have to dig deep to find a way to score.

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Australia under pressure

South Korea are relentlessly applying pressure on the Australian defence.

All you can spot is a sea of pink shirts near or inside the Australia box.

101 mins: Australia 1-1 South Korea

Lee shoots from distance

Lee Jae-sung shoots from distance, though it goes wide. Australia have barely been out of their half in extra-time.

97 mins: Australia 1-1 South Korea

Back-to-back saves from Ryan

Ryan pulls off two saves. First, he goes down to his left to block Hwang’s effort and then quickly manages to keep out another attempt by Lee.

96 mins: Australia 1-1 South Korea

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Unlucky Australia

Australia were just a few minutes away from a semifinal spot, but following Miller’s foul, they now have to fight for at least 30 minutes more to get back into the match.

93 mins: Australia 1-1 South Korea

Australia vs South Korea – AFC Asian Cup 2023 [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]

Extra time begins

The first half of extra time has begun, as Australia and South Korea fight it out for a spot in the semifinals.

91 mins: Australia 1-1 South Korea

‘We are the Dreamers’

As if on cue, the stadium PA is playing South Korean pop star Jungkook’s song, We are the Dreamers, from the Qatar World Cup 2022 soundtrack.

The Korean fans sing along to “we make it happen, ‘cause we believe it” with tears in their eyes.

Not there yet, though.

South Korea fans

Sporting News

Australia vs South Korea score, result, highlights as Son Heung-Min ends Socceroos Asian Cup campaign

Son Heung-Min has led South Korea to the Asian Cup semifinals after they defeated a 10-man Australia 2-1 after extra time.

It was another late show from the Taeguk Warriors, as they equalised with a 94th minute penalty after being behind for all of the second half up to that point, before Son scored an inch perfect free-kick to punch South Korea's ticket to the semifinals.

Despite having much of the ball - and a disallowed goal in the first half - Korea failed to register a shot on goal, and it was Australia who looked more threatening; they made this count in the 42nd minute when Craig Goodwin scored in his second successive match with a well taken volley after a Nathaniel Atkinson cross.

The game followed the same pattern in the second half, with South Korea dominating possession but failing to have the quality pass in the final third, whilst Australia created multiple opportunities on the break.

Australia should have scored at least once, as Martin Boyle and Mitch Duke squandered big chances to seal the game as the half wore on.

And the Socceroos would be punished in a big way for their profligacy as substitute Lewis Miller's lazy challenge on Son gave Hwang Hee-Chan the opportunity to convert from the spot, and he did just that to send the game to extra time.

Australia disintegrated in extra time, as another needless challenge from Miller allowed Son to score his breathtaking free-kick in the 104th minute, before Aiden O'Neill's reckless studs up lunge saw him receive a straight red card, and left Australia with too much of a mountain to climb.

Australia head home in the quarterfinals for a second tournament in a row - and a third time under Graham Arnold - whilst South Korea march on to a semifinal clash against Jordan.

The Sporting News was following the Australia vs South Korea match live, providing score updates, commentary, and highlights as they happened

MORE: Asian Cup fixtures, results, schedule

Australia vs South Korea live score

Australia vs south korea live updates, highlights, and commentary.

IT'S ALL OVER, SOUTH KOREA ARE INTO THE SEMIFINALS! They looked down and out as the game went into stoppage time with Australia in the lead, but a foul from Lewis Miller in the box allowed Hwang Hee-Chan to level the game in added time once again and send the game to extra time. Australia were arguably the better team to that point, but self-destructed in extra time as Son Heung-Min put South Korea ahead with a wonderful free-kick, before Aiden O'Neill was sent off for a studs up challenge. South Korea will face off against Jordan, whilst Australia bow out in the quarterfinals for the second tournament in a row.

120+1 minutes:  A final change for Korea as Lee Kang-In comes off for Jung Sung-Hyun.

120th minute:  Maty Ryan makes another brilliant double save to keep Australia in the game at the death.

118th minute:  The game has petered out somewhat as Australia are fatiguing quickly and Korea are content to see the game out with an extra man advantage.

113th minute:  Korea have acres of space as Australia send numbers forward; Son Heung-Min should seal the game as he has a great opportunity, but he uncharacteristically drags his shot wide.

112th minute:  Son has a pop from distance, but it's straight down the throat of Ryan.

106th minute:  Korea make two changes, as Park Yong-Woo and Hwang Hee-Chan make their exit, with Park Jin-Seob and Oh Hyun-Gyu replacing them. Harry Souttar has also been moved to centre forward for Australia, as they look to use his towering height as a desperate plan B to get back in this game.

106th minute:  Second half of extra time begins, can Australia pull off a miracle?

WATCH THE GOAL IN AUSTRALIA:

WATCH THE GOAL IN USA:

HALF TIME EXTRA TIME

An eventful 15 minutes has seen Korea hit the lead thanks to a Son Heung-Min stunner, and Australia have also been reduced to 10 men after Aiden O'Neill received a straight red card. The Socceroos, after being minutes from a semifinal, are now staring down the barrel of defeat.

105th minute:  The referee has been instructed to go to the screen, and after review has opted to give O'Neill a straight red card. After being so close to a semifinal, Australia's game has completely unravelled.

105th minute:  VAR is currently looking to see if O'Neill's challenge is worthy of a red card...

105th minute:  Aiden O'Neill is booked, and he will miss the semifinal should Australia pull off a comeback of their own.

105th minute:  Australia have been on their feet for much of extra time as South Korea have the momentum and belief. It's hard to see Australia getting back into this game at this rate.

104th minute: GOOOAAALLLL!!!!!! SON HEUNG-MIN SCORES A BRILLAINT FREE-KICK TO PUT KOREA AHEAD! Another silly foul from Miller gives South Korea's star man a chance from the edge of the area, and he makes no mistake as he curls a perfect set piece into the top corner, with Ryan not able to keep it out despite getting the merest of hands to the ball.

95th minute:  A massive double save from Ryan as he firstly denies Hwang's volleyed effort, and he then denies the striker again with the follow up effort from close range.

92nd minute:  Australia make their final change, as Duke leaves the field for Bruno Fornaroli.

91st minute:  Extra time begins at the Al Janoub, can Australia lift themselves after the mental anguish of conceding the stoppage time goal?

Watch the goal in Australia:

The teams can't be split after 90 minutes and we will go to extra time! South Korea have pulled off another late show with a 96th minute penalty after Australia took the lead in the first half thanks to Craig Goodwin. South Korea dominated possession without creating many clear cut opportunities, whilst Mitch Duke and Martin Boyle had guilt edged opportunities to make the game safe. Australia were left to rue their wastefulness when Lewis Miller's silly challenge gave Hwang Hee-Chan an opportunity from the spot, one he did not waste.

90+6 minutes: HWANG HEE-CHAN CONVERTS, SOUTH KOREA EQUALISE!!!!!!! Maty Ryan guesses the right way, but the penalty is fantastic, hit with power into the top corner. It's a fourth stoppage time equaliser in a row for South Korea, and we look like we're heading to extra time.

90+4 minutes:  PENALTY KOREA! Son Heung-Min's silky feet is too much for Lewis Miller to handle, fouling the winger, giving the referee no choice but to point to the spot.

90+1 minutes:  Kim Min Jae is given a yellow card for manhandling Bos, and he will miss the semifinal should Korea qualify.

90th minute:  There will be seven minutes of added time, more than enough time for yet another South Korea late show...

86th minute:  Australia make a final and defensive change, with Martin Boyle making way for centre back Cameron Burgess.

85th minute:  Another change for Korea, as Tae-Hwan Kim is replaced by Hyun-Jun Yang.

84th minute:  That should have been the ball game for Australia! The Socceroos ruthlessly break forward, and Bos' cross is deflected into the path of Duke, but somehow his diving header goes wide with the goal gaping. Another huge moment in this match.

80th minute:  Thankfully for Australia, Ryan is on his feet and the game resumes.

78th minute:  Lee Kang-In dinks a lovely ball into the box and the path of Lee Jae-Sung, but Ryan is out bravely to deny him, though he is now down after receiving a knock, which is a worry due to Ryan's recent facial injury.

77th minute: Hwang Im-Beom has been replaced by Hong Hyun-Seok in midfield.

76th minute:  The ball sits up nicely for McGree, who tries to sidefoot a volley in from the edge of the area, but he can't control the effort. Despite Korea dominating possession, Australia have had eight more shots than them.

74th minute:  Miller's first contribution is to send a long throw into the box, and Duke is able to meet it with his head, though Cho is able to save it.

72nd minute:  Two more changes for Australia, with Lewis Miller replacing Atkinson, whilst the goalscorer Goodwin's night is done and he is replaced by Jordan Bos.

69th minute:  Both sides make their first changes, as Riley McGree and Aiden O'Neill replace Keanu Baccus and Connor Metcalfe, whilst Cho Gue-Sung leaves the pitch for South Korea is replaced by Lee Jae-Sung.

60th minute:  Korea have been getting into good positions, but their final ball has been lacking, and they are also leaving plenty of gaps for Australia to exploit - which is something they are known for under Graham Arnold.

54th minute:  How have Australia not scored there?! A brilliant cross from Goodwin is headed by Boyle straight at the keeper, who then saves Boyle's instant follow up; the ball then falls to Mitch Duke, who somehow smashes a near open goal well over the bar. A huge moment in the match, will Australia live to regret that?

49th minute:  South Korea start strong, as Seol Young-Woo sends in a ball from the left, it falls to Lee Kang-In, but luckily for the Socceroos his shot is tame and straight at Ryan. 

46th minute: Back underway in the second quarterfinal, South Korea have been brilliant in the latter stages of games, especially wit stoppage time equalisers, can they pull off another comeback?

Half time:  Watch Craig Goodwin's goal in Australia:

Watch in USA:

Australia hold a narrow 1-0 lead thanks to Craig Goodwin after a fast-paced first half in this Asian Cup quarterfinal. South Korea had more of the ball and were starting to put Australia under pressure, but Craig Goodwin's well taken volley after a Hwang In-Beom mistake means the Socceroos head into the break with a precious lead. South Korea had a goal disallowed in the 32nd minute after a narrow offside, whilst Connor Metcalfe probably should have scored for Australia. Everything still to play for at the Al Janoub Stadium!

45th minute:  As two minutes of added time are announced, Harry Souttar picks up a silly yellow card, which would rule him out of the semifinal if Australia are to make it. Could be a crucial one in this game and beyond.

42nd minute: GOOOOAAALLLLL FOR AUSTRALIA! IT'S CRAIG GOODWIN AGAIN! An awful pass from Hwang In-Beom gifts possession to Goodwin, and the ball is worked across the box to Atkinson, who is able to hang the ball up to the back post, Goodwin has all the time in the world to volley the ball low and hard at the near post, giving Cho no chance. Perhaps slightly against the run of play, but Australia hold a crucial lead on the cusp of halftime.

41st minute:  A nice sequence of play leads to another Metcalfe opportunity from outside the box, but he puts too much power on it and it goes over the bar.

39th minute:  Martin Boyle has a snapshot from distance, but he hits it horribly and it goes harmlessly wide of the goal.

34th minute: South Korea have their tails up and are putting Australia under a mountain of pressure, can they get the opening goal to reward their play?

32nd minute: South Korea have the ball in the back of the net after a brilliantly worked move, but the finisher Hwang Hee-Chan is adjudged to be offside and the goal will not stand. A big warning sign for the Socceroos, though...

21st minute:  A fantastic ball from the midfield finds Son Heung-Min, but before he can get a shot away, Harry Souttar and Maty Ryan smother the danger.

20th minute:  Huge chance for Australia! Craig Goodwin does brilliantly to break through the lines and gets a shot away, his shot is saved by Cho, and the follow up is somehow missed by Metcalfe, who essentially had an open goal.

18th minute:  Australia with a rare foray forward gives Connor Metcalfe a chance on goal, but with the first shot of the game he drags it wide of the near post.

10th minute:  South Korea having the majority of the ball in the opening stages of this one, though that could suit an Australia side that has impressed in the World Cup and in other big games with a counter-attacking style.

5th minute:  No major incident's to begin the game, as both sides look to gain control and test each other's weaknesses.

The action begins at the Al Janoub Stadium! Will it be Australia or South Korea who progress to a semifinal against Jordan?

3 mins to kickoff:  Two brilliant renditions of the anthems, kickoff is now moments away!

7 mins from kickoff:  The teams are lining up in the tunnel and are about to enter the cauldron of the stadium...

15 mins to kickoff:  South Korea look to have the majority of support in the Al Janoub Stadium tonight, can they use it to their advantage?

30 mins to kickoff:  Australia and South Korea haven't met often, but they met in the 2015 Asian Cup Final; in a dramatic clash in front of 75,000 fans in Sydney, the game went to extra-time before a James Troisi goal secured a 2-1 win for Australia and their first ever Asian Cup. The two captains - Maty Ryan and Son Heung-Min - are the only players left that involved that night, who will lead their country to victory?

1hr to kickoff:  South Korea have also submitted their lineup, and the big news is that penalty shootout hero from the Round of 16 Hwang Hee-Chan has returned to the starting lineup for the first time at the tournament. He is one of three changes, as Jong Woo-Yeong drops out of the starting lineup for Cho Gue-Sung, and Park Yong-Woo replacing Jung Seung-Hung.

  • South Korea confirmed starting lineup:  Cho Hyun-Woo (GK) — Kim Tae-Hwan, Kim Young-Gwon, Kim Min-Jae, Seol Young-Woo — Park Yong-Woo, Hwang In-Beom — Lee Kang-In, Son-Heung Min, Hwang Hee-Chan, Cho Gue-Sung

1hr 10 minutes to kickoff:  Australia's lineup is in, and Graham Arnold has made four changes to the side that beat Indonesia 4-0. Craig Goodwin is rewarded with his goal and assist of the bench with his first start since matchday one, though it comes at the expense of Jordan Bos. Mitch Duke also returns in place of Bruno Fornaroli, whilst Nathaniel Atkinson and Connor Metcalfe are in the starting side ahead of Gethin Jones and Riley McGree.

  • Australia confirmed starting lineup:  Ryan (GK) — Atkinson, Rowles, Souttar, Behich — Metcalfe, Baccus, Irvine — Boyle, Duke, Goodwin

1hr 30 minutes to kickoff:  Some rare cool conditions in Qatar for this one, how will this affect the gameplay?

1hr 45 minutes to kickoff: The first Asian Cup quarterfinal between Tajikistan and Jordan has just finished, and in a tight game Jordan have emerged 1-0 winners thanks to a Vahdat Hanonov own goal in the 66th minute. It marks the first time Jordan have qualified for the semifinals, and they will take on either Australia or South Korea.

2 hours prior to kickoff: Hello and welcome to The Sporting News' live coverage of the opening quarterfinal of the 2023 Asian Cup between Australia and South Korea. In what is a repeat of the 2015 final, both sides will be looking to put below par performances at the tournament so far behind them in what will be their toughest match to date, as Australia still face questions about their attack, and South Korea need to stop their reliance on late goals to get them out of sticky situations. South Korea may have the star power in Heung-Min Son and Kim Min-Jae, but Australia tend to do better against opponents who have more of the ball, where they can use their counter attacking exploits. It should be a highly intriguing match, we cannot wait for the action to begin!

Australia vs South Korea lineups, team news

Australia were boosted by the return of striker Mitch Duke off the bench against Indonesia after he missed their final group game.

Craig Goodwin also made his return to the side off the bench, and had an instant impact with a goal and an assist, though it is unknown whether coach Graham Arnold is willing to play the South Australian and exciting youngster Jordan Bos in the same starting side.

Jurgen Klinsmann’s substitutes did the damage against Saudi Arabia, with Cho Gue-Sung scoring the equaliser, while Hwang Hee-Chan helped change the game off the bench and scored the winning penalty in the shootout.

He has rarely been sighted at the tournament due to injury, but his timely return to the side may just be the boost the Taeguk Warriors need to return to their best and charge towards the final.

Australia vs South Korea live stream, TV channel

The Australia vs South Korea match from the Asian Cup kicks off at 6:30 p.m. local time from the Al Janoub Stadium in Al Wakrah

Below are the corresponding times, TV channels, and live streams to watch the match in regions around the world

Australia vs South Korea score, result, highlights as Son Heung-Min ends Socceroos Asian Cup campaign

Australia

South Korea

  • Craig Goodwin ( 42' )
  • Aiden O'Neill ( 105'+4' )
  • Hwang Hee-Chan ( 90'+6' Pen )
  • Son Heung-Min ( 104' )

Match Formations

Game information.

  • Ahmed Abu Bakar Said Al Kaf

Klinsmann: I don't want to leave it so late all the time!

Son et winner sends south korea past australia, match timeline, match commentary.

travel to australia from south korea

Asian Cup News

Being underdogs once more against qatar in asian cup final should do little to faze jordan, jürgen klinsmann says he won't resign -- but could south korea give him the sack, asian cup transfer targets: which young guns will europe's giants be eying.

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    Updated: 15 January 2024 Latest update:You may be required to register on the Korean Q-code quarantine registration system prior to arrival or to complete a health questionnaire on arrival. Check with the Republic of Korea Embassy or Consulate for the latest requirements for Australians. (see 'Travel'). We advise:

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    (Updated: 18/11/2021) Useful links from Korean outlets Latest Seoul Metropolitan Government News Korean Government COVID-19 Test at no cost available to all foreign residents and irregular residents. Korean Government Social Distancing Guidelines Korean Government COVID-19 Code of Conduct Korea Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (KCDC)

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  4. Visa and Citizenship

    Citizens of the Republic of Korea (and other ETA eligible passport holders) travelling to Australia for up to 3 months for tourism, visiting friends or family, or on business visits can apply for an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) through the Australian ETA App. Download the Australian ETA app for free from the App Store (Apple) or Google Play...

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  8. [Updated] Excited to Travel to South Korea from Australia in 2022? Here

    Yes! Vaccinated Aussie citizens and residents can travel to South Korea from Australia. But before you leave Australia you need: Proof of negative pre-departure COVID-19 test results Travellers must have a printed negative COVID-19 PCR test result in English or Korean.

  9. South Korea Entry Requirements for Australian Citizens

    Yes, Australians need a visa or travel authorization to enter South Korea. Australian passport holders can visit South Korea for up to 90 days without a visa for tourism and business activities. To visit the country visa-free, Australians must apply for a South Korea ETA travel authorization. South Korea K-ETA for Australian Citizens

  10. South Korea to Australia

    Rome2Rio makes travelling from South Korea to Australia easy. Rome2Rio is a door-to-door travel information and booking engine, helping you get to and from any location in the world. Find all the transport options for your trip from South Korea to Australia right here.

  11. Cheap Flights from South Korea to Australia from $273

    Find cheap flights from South Korea to Australia from. $273. 1 adult. Economy. Direct flights only. Sun 3/3. Sun 10/3.

  12. South Korea International Travel Information

    TOURIST VISA REQUIRED: No - From April 1, 2023, to December 31, 2024, the Korean Electronic Travel Authorization (K-ETA) is not required for US citizens traveling for short-term business or tourism purposes. VACCINATIONS: None CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY: None CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT: None ALL / Embassies and Consulates

  13. Cheap flights from South Korea to Australia

    Where in Australia will you fly to from South Korea? There are 171 places in Australia you could fly to from South Korea. Here are the best prices out there. 1+ stops From $333 1+ stops From $381 Melbourne 1+ stops From $397 Brisbane Direct From $401 See more destinations Flying from South Korea to Australia: fast facts

  14. Cheap flights from South Korea to Australia

    The cheapest flight deals from South Korea to Australia. Sydney.$429 per passenger.Departing Wed, 6 Mar, returning Tue, 12 Mar.Return flight with China Eastern.Outbound indirect flight with China Eastern, departs from Incheon International Airport on Wed, 6 Mar, arriving in Sydney.Inbound indirect flight with China Eastern, departs from Sydney ...

  15. Direct Qantas Flights From Australia to South Korea Take Off

    Qantas will today launch flights to another new international destination, with direct services between Sydney and Seoul taking off for the first time in nearly 15 years to meet growing demand. Seoul is one of the 28 international ports that Qantas has resumed or launched new services to since Australia's borders reopened.

  16. Visa Options

    Visa Options. If you have an ETA-eligible passport, for example a Korean passport, you can apply for an Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) to travel to Australia for a short tourism or business trip. Please see ETA for more information. If you do not have an ETA-eligible passport, and wish to travel to Australia for a short tourism or business ...

  17. Cheap flights from Australia to South Korea

    Where in South Korea will you fly to from Australia? There are 15 places in South Korea you could fly to from Australia. Here are the best prices out there. Seoul 1+ stops From $432 Busan 1+ stops From $432 Jeju 1+ stops From $661 Daegu 1+ stops From $755 See more destinations Flying from Australia to South Korea: fast facts

  18. World's biggest spokeless Ferris wheel ride to be built in South Korea

    World's biggest spokeless Ferris wheel ride to be built in South Korea. The gigantic 180 metre structure will carry 1,400 people per ride and be connected to a zip line and subway station.

  19. South Korea Travel Restrictions

    Most visitors from Australia, regardless of vaccination status, can enter South Korea. Entry Open for vaccinated visitors COVID-19 testing Not required Quarantine Not required for vaccinated visitors Restaurants Open Bars Masks Not required in public spaces and public transportation. COVID-19 testing Quarantine Documents & Additional resources

  20. Australia → Korea

    The cheapest way to get from Australia to Korea costs only ₩559,182, and the quickest way takes just 13 hours. Find the travel option that best suits you. Rome2Rio uses cookies to help personalize content and show you personalised ads.

  21. Full time: Australia 1-2 South Korea

    Half time in extra time: Australia 1-2 South Korea. Australia were 1-0 up after 95 minutes of normal time. Now they are a goal and a man down after a chastening first period of extra-time. South ...

  22. Things to know before traveling to South Korea

    Most travelers - including citizens of the US, Australia and the UK - can visit South Korea visa-free for up to 90 days (up to six months for Canadians). However, you'll still need to apply for a Korea Electronic Travel Authorization on the K-ETA website at least 72 hours before departure.

  23. Cheap flights from South Korea to Australia

    Where in Australia will you fly to from South Korea? There are 171 places in Australia you could fly to from South Korea. Here are the best prices out there. 1+ stops From $492 Melbourne 1+ stops From $605 Brisbane Direct From $617 1+ stops From $636 See more destinations Flying from South Korea to Australia: fast facts

  24. Australia vs South Korea 1-2: Asian Cup 2023 quarterfinal

    All the updates as South Korea came back to beat Australia in the second quarterfinal of the AFC Asian Cup 2023. By Manasi Pathak Published On 2 Feb 2024 2 Feb 2024

  25. Services for Australians

    Passports and Notarial Services. Appointments for passport applications or notarial services are available between the hours of 9:00~12:00 p.m. and 1:30~4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday at the Australian Embassy, Seoul. The Embassy public holidays are available here . Click here for further information or to make a Notarial Appointment.

  26. South Korea 2-1 Australia (Feb 2, 2024) Game Analysis

    Full Scoreboard ». ESPN. Expert recap and game analysis of the South Korea vs. Australia Afc Asian Cup game from February 2, 2024 on ESPN.

  27. Australia vs South Korea score, result, highlights as Son Heung-Min

    The Australia vs South Korea match from the Asian Cup kicks off at 6:30 p.m. local time from the Al Janoub Stadium in Al Wakrah. Below are the corresponding times, TV channels, and live streams to ...

  28. South Korea 2-1 Australia (3 Feb, 2024) Final Score

    There are no Asian Cup events for Wednesday, February 07, 2024. Game summary of the South Korea vs. Australia Afc Asian Cup game, final score 2-1, from 3 February 2024 on ESPN (AU).

  29. Australia to South Korea

    There are 6 ways to get from Australia to South Korea by plane Select an option below to see step-by-step directions and to compare ticket prices and travel times in Rome2Rio's travel planner. Recommended option Fly Brisbane to Incheon • 13h Fly from Brisbane (BNE) to Incheon (ICN) BNE - ICN ₩571,227 - ₩1124,915 Cheapest option