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The ultimate guide for law students to write a perfect field visit report.

Law students have to do field visits as a part of the standard course requirement in school. Professors use field visit reports to test a student’s understanding of key theoretical concepts and applications in practice. Whether it’s a visit to a law enforcement agency, courtroom, or legal institution, knowing how to craft a perfect field visit report is a crucial skill.

To write a perfect field visit report as a law student, one must follow a planned format to ensure proper presentation of observations, synthesis of findings, and interpretation of data. This article provides the ultimate guide for law students to write a perfect field visit report by explaining all structural components. Read on to learn what to include from start to finish.

How to write a field visit report from start to finish

In law studies, a field visit report is more than an average report. The report requires law students to analyze real-life scenarios and explain how and why they happened. To fit all the details, the report takes a similar format to a thesis paper. To ensure you create an outstanding field visit report that meets all requirements, here’s a guide tailored specifically for law students:

Start the report by introducing key details about the report, the author, and institution. The title page contains details such as the author’s name, institutional affiliation, date, and report title. If the field visit was for a real-life legal case, include the surname of the judge and parties involved. The title page is set up based on the required formatting style.

Synopsis or summary

This part contains a brief overview of the report’s purpose, length, location, date, and timeline of the visit. The summary looks like an introduction and takes about 10 percent of the report. You can mention important details, findings, and recommendations from the report to give the readers a glimpse of what to expect from the paper. End the synopsis with a thesis statement that presents the main idea and the value of your report.

Table of contents

Similar to a thesis, a law field visit report should have a table of contents that helps readers navigate different sections. The content should reflect the exact structure followed in your report and include page numbers.

The body of field visit report by a law student covers the introduction and case discussion. The section deals with facts and analysis rather than opinion. Ensure every section is precise, clear, and written in the past tense. Let’s delve into the sections that make up the body of a field visit report:

  • Brief introduction — This part explains what the report is about. It includes background information and theoretical perspectives applied during the visit.
  • Objectives — Students can use the section to explain the goals and objectives of the field visit, such as observing court proceedings or analyzing practices by law enforcement officers. Each observation must appear in a separate paragraph and should answer where, what, who, why, and when.
  • Methodology — explain the methods used during the field visit, such as observation, interviews, or document review. You can also explain any challenges encountered during data collection.
  • Analysis and interpretation — Analyze and interpret your findings based on data collected. Pick the most relevant observations that add perspective or knowledge to the reader. You can also include significant interactions or notable practices observed during the field visit. Apply theories learned in class to interpret findings by demonstrating how they correlate with your observations.

The conclusion is a brief recap of the main points that support your thesis. Use it to highlight the significance of your field visit. Only include details discussed in previous parts of the report. Also, make sure the conclusion highlights key findings or details of the case.

Recommendations

Recommendations offer solutions to legal institutions on gaps uncovered during the field visit. The recommendations must suggest specific people to implement them and the timeline. The recommendation can also include a call to action.

If the report includes supporting diagrams, graphs, pictures, videos, or audio resources, include them in the appendix section of the paper. Some of these materials are cumbersome, undermining the flow of text. Thus, it’s better to separate these materials by adding them to the appendix. 

Bibliography

You will need to learn more about the topic and cases by reviewing literature on the subject. Every source used in the report must be listed in the bibliography or reference section of the paper. Ensure you use current and credible sources with current data to increase the accuracy of your report. List the sources in alphabetical order.

Crafting a perfect field visit report needs proper planning, meticulous data collection, and thoughtful analysis.

Good report writing starts in the field by recording key pieces of information you can derive meaningful insights when writing a report. Do not speculate or manipulate data to fit a theoretical framework. By following the guide provided in this post, law students can demonstrate their academic excellence in field report writing.

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A Comprehensive Internship Diary for Law Students

  • Career Guide Law/Legal Internship Opportunities
  • November 30, 2023

Internship

Embarking on the journey of legal education in India is not merely confined to the lecture halls and textbooks. The Bar Council of India (BCI) and the National Education Policy of 2020 have recognised the importance of practical exposure for law students, mandating internships as an integral part of their curriculum.

In this article, we discuss to how prepare an internship diary for law students, exploring the facets of time spent with a lawyer, understanding case filings, gaining practical experience, court visits and the overarching impact on a student’s legal education.

The Regulatory Landscape

Before delving into the specifics of maintaining an internship diary for law students, it’s crucial to understand the regulatory landscape that shapes the internship requirements for law students in India. The Bar Council of India, the apex regulatory body for legal education and practice in the country, stipulates that registered law students must complete a minimum of 12 weeks of internship for a three-year course and 20 weeks for a five-year course.

These internships are intended to provide students with real-world exposure, bridging the gap between theoretical knowledge and practical application.

Importance of Internship Diary for Law Students

Internship diaries for law students play a pivotal role in the legal education landscape, transcending beyond mere academic requirements. These records serve as a tangible reflection of a law student’s transition from theory to practice, documenting the practical nuances of legal work. The importance of internship diaries lies in their ability to provide a structured account of hands-on experiences, courtroom exposure and skills honed during internships.

They serve as a roadmap for personal and professional growth, offering insights into the real-world applications of legal knowledge. Additionally, these law student internship diary act as valuable resources for future reference, aiding in self-assessment and reinforcing the significance of practical exposure in shaping competent and well-rounded legal professionals.

Structuring the Internship Diary for Law Students

The journey in the law student internship diary begins with a title page that encapsulates the essence of your internship experience. Include details such as the name of the law firm or organisation, the duration of the internship and your personal details.

Table of Contents

Create a comprehensive table of contents that serves as a roadmap for your internship. This section of the internship diary for law students should outline the various components of your diary, allowing readers to navigate through your experiences systematically.

Acknowledgment Section

Express gratitude to the organisation and individuals who facilitated your internship. This section is an opportunity to acknowledge the support and guidance you received during your time with the legal professionals.

Company Background Information

Provide a brief overview of the law firm or organisation where you completed your internship. Highlight its areas of specialisation, notable cases and any unique aspects that distinguish it within the legal landscape.

  • Work Responsibilities

Dive into the specifics of your daily tasks and responsibilities during the internship. In this part of the law student internship diary, discuss your legal research, drafting assignments and any courtroom exposure you gained. This section should provide a detailed account of the skills you put into practice.

Skills Learned and Experiences Had

Reflect on the skills you acquired during the internship and the experiences that left a lasting impact. Whether it’s honing legal research skills, improving written communication or understanding the intricacies of client interaction, this section of internship diary for law students is an opportunity to showcase personal and professional growth.

Court Visits

If your internship involved court visits, elaborate on these experiences. Discuss the cases you observed, the court proceedings you witnessed and the insights gained from observing legal professionals in action. This section serves as a bridge between theoretical knowledge and the practical realities of the legal system.

Also Read:  Legal Internships for Law Students

Law student internship diary sample.

Title Page:

Internship Diary: Bridging Theory and Practice

[Your Name]

[Law School Name]

[Duration of Internship]

[Name of Law Firm or Organisation]

Table of Contents:

  • Acknowledgment
  • Company Background
  • Legal Research
  • Drafting Assignments
  • Courtroom Experiences
  • Skills Development
  • Reflections

Acknowledgment:

I express my sincere gratitude to [Name of Law Firm/Organisation] for providing me with an enriching internship experience. Special thanks to [Supervisor’s Name] and the entire team for their guidance and support throughout my internship.

Company Background:

[Provide a brief overview of the law firm or organisation, including its areas of specialisation, notable cases and any unique aspects that distinguish it.]

Work Responsibilities:

During my internship, I was entrusted with a myriad of tasks, including legal research, drafting assignments and client interaction. This section will delve into the specifics of my day-to-day responsibilities.

Legal Research:

Describe instances where you conducted legal research, the topics you explored and how this research contributed to ongoing cases or projects.

Drafting Assignments:

Discuss any drafting assignments you undertook, such as contracts, legal opinions or pleadings. Highlight the skills you developed in legal drafting.

Courtroom Experiences:

Detail your experiences during court visits, including cases observed, court proceedings witnessed and interactions with legal professionals. Reflect on the practical insights gained.

Skills Development:

Reflect on the skills you developed during the internship, such as legal research, writing, communication and interpersonal skills. Provide specific examples of how these skills were applied.

Reflections:

This section allows for personal reflections on the overall internship experience. Discuss challenges faced, lessons learned and how the experience influenced your perspective on the legal profession.

Conclusion:

Summarise the key takeaways from the internship, emphasising the alignment between academic knowledge and practical application. Discuss how the internship has contributed to your personal and professional growth as a law student.

Maintaining an internship diary for law students is not just a mandatory requirement; it is a tool for personal and professional development. By documenting your experiences, challenges and achievements, you not only fulfil academic obligations but also create a tangible record of your journey into the legal profession.

The law student internship diary is a testament to the transformative power of practical exposure, illustrating how law students evolve from classroom enthusiasts to adept professionals ready to navigate the complexities of the legal labyrinth.

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Remembering Ram Jethmalani: What a young law student who interned with him learnt after a fiery cross-examination

Tanvi Dubey and Ram Jethmalani during a press conference

My first meeting with Ram Sir was as a law student — one who considers herself extremely fortunate to get an opportunity to intern with a legal legend like him. On the first day of my internship, I was informed that I needed to accompany him to the Patiala House Court, where he was going for a cross-examination. Having heard a lot about his incisive art of cross-examination, I was extremely curious and delighted in equal measure. While on our way to the court, he asked me whether it was the first time that I was going to watch a cross-examination. I said yes. Upon hearing that, he said, 'Let's chat after the cross-examination'. 

When he entered the court premises, every lawyer who saw him, even if from a distance, rushed to him to either shake hands or touch his feet. And when he started the cross-examination, I was awestruck with the dedication and commitment with which he continued to question the person in the stand for almost three hours at a stretch — mind you, I am talking about a time when he was over 90 years of age. While on our way back to office, he asked me what I had noticed during his cross. I told him everything that I had taken note of. To which he replied, “ T his is a skill you acquire through long exp e rience and long introspection. If somebody wants to really read what interesting cross-examination can be, you should read the cross-examination of  Oscar Wilde in his defamation case which was filed against (Lord Alfred) Douglas’ father. ”

advocate chamber visit report law student

From Independence to the Emergency, from Rajiv Gandhi's assassination to the 2G Scam — you name any crucial event or a high profile matter and his name will come up

Days went by and as my association continued with his chamber, I saw in him a role model and a mentor. To say that he led an illustrious life, would be an understatement. Each meeting with him taught me a new lesson, which not only helped me understand the basic nuances of law but also helped me learn several life-changing lessons.

There was always somebody who needed his help, and he would help everyone in the best way possible. I'm sure there are hundreds of people who have many such stories about the phenomenon that was Ram Jethmalani.

From his way of reading and interpreting the provisions of criminal law in a totally unique manner to the knack of making innovative arguments, I learnt so much just by observing him.

advocate chamber visit report law student

Tanvi with Jethmalani during a badminton session

One of things I learnt was the need for attention to detail. In his briefings, I saw him meticulously examining each detail in the matter and also saw him questioning the client even on the minutest details of his case, so as to get absolute clarity on the facts of the case. Quite often, he would come up with a hidden fact or an argument, leaving the rest of us marvelling at the man's foresight and intellect.

For him, the courtroom was a stage and he was an actor — albeit one with empathy and passion. His way of framing an argument and also presenting it was undoubtedly magical — there was always pin-drop silence in a crowded courtroom when Ram Sir started his argument. He had absolute clarity in his arguments and also presented them in the most understandable manner. 

His love for legal education, students and law universities had no boundaries. He was a completely self-made man, reaching Mumbai practically penniless and yet making it big on the merit of his wit, tenacity, determination and back-breaking hard-work. 

advocate chamber visit report law student

Ram Sir was definitely larger than life.  From Independence to the Emergency, from Rajiv Gandhi's assassination to the 2G Scam — you name any crucial event or a high profile matter and his name will come up.  It would be apt to say that he saw India growing , which was also reflected in many of his arguments.

I fondly remember the day that he gave me a copy of his biography  Ram Jethmalani: Maverick Unchanged, Unrepentant  with a note which read  “ If you have chosen this profession, be prepared to put in a relentless amount of effort and hard work. There is no substitute to hard work and there is an abs o lute delight in putting your best effort into what you are doing. ”  These words motivated me when I started my journey as a young lawyer and will continue to be the guiding light for the years to come.

I have no words to thank him for the role he has played in my life as a mentor, role model and an inspiration. Although he is not with us anymore, I am sure his principles and his teachings will guide us for the years to come. 

His dedicated student

Tanvi Dubey

Tanvi Dubey is an advocate with the Supreme Court. Views expressed here are her own

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Mika (None)     --> 08 March 2012

Essay on visit to advocate office

I need to write essay on "A Visit to Advocate's office" as a assignment.

Can you please help me in writing the essay?

I had been once to advocate's office. But I am not able to put many words.. Could you plesea guide me?

advocate chamber visit report law student

 5 Replies

Nasmetha   --> 08 January 2019

Raj Kumar Makkad

Raj Kumar Makkad (Adv P & H High Court Chandigarh)     --> 08 April 2020

This topic can be visualized as long as you desire. Start from the expectations/mindset or presumption when you had to visit a lawyer;s chamber for the first time. Give words to your thought and when you entered in the chamber then what did you saw may be the second paragraph. Then you may touch the presence of the litigants, their behavior, the case which was being discussed there, how and which dealing impressed the lawyer and you, with whom you talked, how much time you remained there, what transpired in your presence there and ultimately when you left, what was your impression may be the points to be touched in your topic.

Master Paper Writers

Master Paper Writers   --> 14 March 2022

Top calibre, copyright infringement free and appropriately arranged tasks are those that are expected by the understudies for getting passing marks. Each understudy wishes to  Essay Empire achieve passing marks for his brilliant future yet this is by all accounts quite a problem as today the opposition has expanded so a lot and each understudy makes an honest effort to get his future.

Jandal   --> 10 May 2022

The end of the school year is just around the corner and I need to close out subjects and hand in a lot of homework. I need to hand in my essay very soon, is there a website where I can buy one?  

Yesuraju Malladi

Yesuraju Malladi   --> 09 January 2023

Please replay

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Legal/Advocacy Internships, Externships & Volunteer Opportunities

Deadline date, aclu socal advocacy internships, externships, & volunteer opportunities.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California (ACLU SoCal) is currently accepting applications for interns, externs, and volunteers to work in our Los Angeles, Orange County (Santa Ana), Inland Empire (San Bernardino), and Kern County (Bakersfield) offices. We are accepting internship applications from students at all academic levels, including high school students, undergraduates, law students, social work students, and other graduate students. We are also accepting applications for volunteers who are not currently enrolled in an academic program. People of color, women, people with disabilities, people over 55, and people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or intersex are encouraged to apply. Please review the application instructions carefully.

About ACLU SoCal

The ACLU of Southern California comprises two organizations: The ACLU of Southern California and the ACLU Foundation of Southern California (collectively "ACLU SoCal"). Founded in 1923, ACLU SoCal has been at the forefront of numerous major efforts for civil liberties, civil rights, and equal justice in California. ACLU SoCal tackles a vast array of issues, including criminal justice, First Amendment, gender equity, reproductive justice, LGBTQ rights, immigrants' rights, police practices, education equity, jails reform, and economic justice. The ACLU SoCal has offices in Los Angeles, Orange County, Inland Empire, and Kern County.

ACLU of Southern California is committed to developing a culture of diversity, equity, respect, and inclusion and to strive to maintain a workforce that reflects the communities that we serve. The ACLU SoCal is an equal opportunity employer that does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of any status or condition protected by applicable law. We encourage all qualified individuals to apply and value people of all races, genders (including gender identity or expression), sexual orientations, disabilities, citizenships, ages, religions, and national origins and who have different marital statuses, family caregiving responsibilities, lived experiences with the criminal justice systems, and genetic information. ACLU SoCal does not tolerate discrimination or harassment on the basis of any of these characteristics.

The ACLU SoCal is committed to providing reasonable accommodation to individuals with disabilities. If you are a qualified individual with a disability and need assistance applying online, please e-mail [email protected] . If you are selected for an interview, you will receive additional information regarding how to request an accommodation for the interview process.

Internship/Externship Information

NOTE: Due to COVID19, we have both virtual and hybrid internships until further notice.  We do not have internship opportunities that are fully in-person.  Please check back on this posting for updates and changes to this rule.

Interns will be assigned to a specific project/subject area. Please review the individual project group postings below for a more detailed description of their work and specific intern/volunteer needs.

The ACLU SoCal is currently unable to pay stipends for interns or volunteers outside of Summer Internships. Applicants are encouraged to apply for Public Interest Law Foundation grants or other grants and to investigate work-study options as alternative sources of compensation. The ACLU SoCal can serve as a work study host and will support students' applications for funding with supporting materials and documentation.

Criminal Justice

Economic justice, education, student rights & juvenile justice, first amendment, immigrants' rights.

  • Jails Project

LGBTQ, Gender & Reproductive Justice Project

  • Police Practices & National Security

Legal Intake

Activist engagement, summer interns.

We ask that students commit to no fewer than eight weeks and prefer ten-week commitments or longer (although exceptions may be made in certain circumstances). The office is open five days a week and successful applicants will work eight-hour days (with some occasional longer days depending on the project deadlines). The ACLU SoCal endeavors to make our summer internships as rewarding as possible. Each year, the ACLU SoCal hosts eight to 10 “Brown Bag” presentations that are open to interns from all local non-profits. Past guests include Ninth Circuit and District Court judges, as well as UC Berkeley Law School Dean Erwin Chemerinsky who typically discusses the current and upcoming Supreme Court terms. ACLU attorneys and advocates also host internal trainings for all interns on topics such as applying for clerkships, applying for fellowships, and interviewing clients to draft declarations. Although we have limited resources, our interns are invited to several social events as well.

We strongly encourage interns to seek funding from their schools and apply for other grants or scholarships.  The ACLU of Southern California has limited funding available for summer interns who request it.  Interns may receive a supplemental stipend as a top off to bring their total funding up to $7000, with individual stipends not to exceed $2000. 

To be eligible for supplemental funding, you must commit to working full time for at least 8 weeks over the summer. 

Applications for Summer 2024 Internships are open from September 1, 2023 to February 10, 2024.

Fall/Winter/Spring Interns

ACLU SoCal welcomes interns/externs in the fall, winter, and spring semesters. The number hired varies depending upon the needs of staff. Students should be able to commit to a minimum of 10 hours each week during the semester (some of which occasionally may be performed out of the office).

Applications for the Fall, Winter, and Spring semesters are accepted year-round but we close applications on the dates below:

  • Fall Deadline: August 3, 2023
  • Spring Semester and Winter Quarter Internships- December 9, 2023
  • Spring Quarter Internships - February 17, 2024

The ACLU SoCal also frequently accepts non-student volunteers who are both attorneys and non-attorneys. Volunteers should be able to commit to working at least 15 hours a week over eight weeks, in or out of the office, or the hourly equivalent over a shorter period of weeks. In addition to the information listed in the following section, please state in your application your intended hourly commitment and duration of volunteer service. Please understand that the nature of the work we do may not allow us to engage all who may be interested in contributing time. Please follow all application procedures described below. In addition, please include a list of references.

People who seek to volunteer less time can sign up here .

How to Apply

All applicants should submit the following via email ( [email protected] ) or U.S. mail (email is strongly preferred):

  • Cover letter
  • Writing sample
  • Transcript (for current students)

In your subject line, please include the following information in brackets: your preferred subject area(s), your geographic preference(s), and the term for which you are applying. For example:

"Subject: [First Am/Immigration] [OC/IE/KERN/LA] [Summer 2024]" or "Subject: [Jails] [LA/OC/KERN IE] [FALL 2023]."

We encourage applicants to indicate no more than one subject area preference, but you may also list more than one or "[General]" as your preferred subject areas if you do not have a particular interest.

We are more likely to hire candidates with geographic flexibility. We cannot guarantee applicants' preferences and we may offer you a position outside of your areas of interest or geographic preference depending on our needs.

Applications delivered by e-mail to [email protected] are strongly preferred. However, applications can be submitted by U.S. mail to:

Internship Coordinator ACLU Foundation of Southern California 1313 West Eighth St., Suite 200 Los Angeles, California 90017

The ACLU SoCal is currently accepting applications for interns who are interested in working on abolition and criminal legal system issues.

Our office works closely with community partners to conduct impactful advocacy and litigation on several criminal legal system issues in California.

We, through the affiliate's Jails Project (please see  Jails Project's  posting for more information), achieved a historic settlement in  Rosas v. Baca , a federal class action lawsuit that alleged former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca and his command staff condoned a long-standing and widespread pattern of violence by deputies against people incarcerated in the jails. Under the settlement, the Sheriff's Department adopted a plan that includes implementation of robust policies to prevent abuse of people who are incarcerated, enhancement in training in use of force for all veteran deputies and new hires, as well as radically enhanced methods for tracking and review of use of force incidents and the complaints and grievances of incarcerated people. In another lawsuit,  McKibben v. McMahon , we challenged the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department's disparate treatment of gay, bisexual, and transgender people housed in the West Valley Detention Center's "Alternative Lifestyle Tank," where they are denied equal time out of cell and access to religious, educational, rehabilitative, and vocational programming and are regularly subject to harassment by deputies and custody specialists.

Beyond our litigation, we work with our community partners on a broad array of local and statewide advocacy priorities, including reducing the number of people incarcerated, increasing community-based diversion and alternatives to incarceration, and holding law enforcement accountable.

Our interns will have an opportunity to conduct legal research, drafting, and analysis for our ongoing litigation and policy projects, and may work on public education, community engagement, advocacy, legislation, and monitoring efforts.

For more information on opportunities to intern in the Jails Project, please see the  Jails Project  posting below.

Undergrads, law school students, students in other academic programs, and non-students are encouraged to apply. We are seeking interns for our Los Angeles, Orange County and Inland Empire offices year round.

ACLU SoCal is currently accepting applications for interns who are interested in working on economic justice issues. Our economic justice work falls in three main areas: challenging the criminalization of poverty; expanding access to basic human needs like housing and healthcare, with a particular focus on protecting the rights of the homeless; and advancing affirmative legal rights to basic human needs. Our office has been at the forefront of litigation and advocacy on a growing number of economic justice issues in California.

For example, in Victor Valley Family Resource Center v. City of Hesperia , we challenged the City of Hesperia's attempts to unlawfully restrict housing and support services for individuals with criminal records in violation of state law and the federal constitution.

In Glover v. City of Laguna Beach , we challenged Laguna Beach's criminalization and harassment of homeless persons, as well as its lack of resources for the homeless, as violating the ADA, the Eighth Amendment and due process.

In Santiago v. Los Angeles , we challenged the LAPD's policy and practice of seizing and destroying street vendors' property as violating the Fourth Amendment and due process.

In addition to this ongoing litigation, our office is actively engaged in community engagement and policy advocacy at the local and state level on a broad array of economic justice issues, including: campaigns to raise/restore revenues to fund basic human needs services; repeal court and criminal administrative fines and fees; reform excessive debt-collection policies that further keep people experiencing poverty poor; advance the right to healthcare and housing; expand rights to paid sick days and family leave; and increase access to affordable housing.

Our legal interns will have an opportunity to conduct legal research, drafting, and analysis for our ongoing litigation and policy projects. Legal interns also will assist in public education, community engagement, advocacy, legislation, and monitoring efforts.

Our non-legal interns will have the opportunity to work on active campaigns, develop public education materials, give know your rights presentations to community members, attend coalition meetings, and perform drafting and data analysis for our reports.

Undergrads, law school students, and students in other academic programs are encouraged to apply. We are seeking interns for our Orange County, Inland Empire and Los Angeles offices for the summer, fall, and spring academic terms.

The ACLU SoCal is currently accepting applications for interns who are interested in working on education, student rights, and juvenile justice issues.

Our office has been at the forefront of litigation and advocacy on a number of education and student rights issues in California.

For example, in Reed v. State of California , we filed a class action lawsuit against the State of California and Los Angeles Unified School District to enjoin budget-based layoffs at three Los Angeles middle schools because they denied students their fundamental right under the California constitution to equal educational opportunity.

In DJ v. State of California , we filed a lawsuit on behalf of parents, students, and a former administrator against the State of California for its failure to respond to reports that school districts did not provide essential language instruction to English learner students.

Most recently, in Cruz v. State of California , we filed a class action lawsuit against the State of California for failing to address the factors that reduce actual student learning time, denying students at low-income schools an equal education.

Beyond our litigation, we are also actively involved in community advocacy and legislative efforts to shape education policy. For example, we currently are a leader in overseeing the implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula, which is the new way school districts receive funding in California. We also are involved in a wide variety of student discipline and campus police issues, including leading a campaign to remove LAUSD's random student metal detector policy and writing reports about school policies and the school-to-prison pipeline.

Our legal interns will conduct legal research, drafting, and analysis for our ongoing litigation and policy projects. In previous years, our interns met with teachers and students to draft declarations, assisted in drafting legal briefs, and helped our attorneys prepare for depositions. Legal interns also assist in public education efforts by drafting know-your-rights materials and helping conduct presentations.

Our non-legal interns will participate in community engagement, policy advocacy, workshop development and presentation, campaign development, and coalition building. The internship will mainly focus on campaign support, issue-based projects, reports, and intakes.

Undergrads, law school students, and students in other academic programs are encouraged to apply; however, you need not be enrolled in a higher education program. We are seeking interns for both our Los Angeles and Inland Empire offices for the summer, fall, and spring academic terms.

The ACLU SoCal is currently accepting applications for interns who are interested in working on First Amendment, government transparency, and voting rights.

We do First Amendment work on issues relating to freedom of speech and protest, and free exercise of religion. We also work on Public Records Act and Open Meetings issues to ensure the government remains transparent and allows for meaningful public participation so they may hold government accountable.

As part of our voting work, we provide legal, organizing, and mapping support to our partners that are engaged in decennial redistricting and/or California Voting Rights Act work, advocate in support of legislation that expands the franchise and makes voting easier and more accessible to Californians, and conduct local advocacy to ensure that voters are not being disenfranchised.  

Here is a sample of our First Amendment, government transparency cases, and voting cases:

In Rosebrock v. Beiter , we challenged a practice by the VA in Los Angeles of allowing people to hang American flags on the perimeter fence of the VA campus, while forbidding our client to hang an American flag upside as a form of protest of the misuse of VA land.

In Davies v. County of Los Angeles , we represented a diverse group of religious leaders and educators challenging the decision by the County to add a Latin Cross to the County seal and succeeded in obtaining a permanent injunction.

In ACLU/Preven v. Los Angeles , we litigated under the California Public Records Act whether the County can withhold billing records showing how much it is paying private lawyers hired to defend the County and the Sheriff's Department in numerous suits challenging excessive force and other illegal acts by the Department. We obtained an important victory for government transparency in the California Supreme Court.

We are currently litigating People's Homeless Taskforce v. County of Orange , challenging multiple policies and practices adopted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, including the Board's prohibition on addressing individual supervisors at public meetings and its policy authorizing the immediate destruction of public records.

We are currently litigating Doe v. City of McFarland , a challenge under the Brown Act to McFarland City Council’s decision to severely limit public access to its meetings, including a meeting where the Council made the highly controversial decision to permit the opening of two immigration detention facilities.

In Moreno v. City of Anaheim , we successfully challenged the City Council’s at-large election system that diluted the voting power of Latinx voters. Following a settlement and a series of public hearings and workshops, the City of Anaheim adopted a district map that provides Latinx voters had a real opportunity to elect candidates of their choice.

In addition to litigation, we attempt to protect the First Amendment and further government transparency through developing "Know Your Rights" material and attempting to resolve what we perceive to be First Amendment and other violations through advocacy short of litigation. In the voting rights space, we provide trainings to our partners and the public. We also provide the public with information about upcoming elections, including information on voting options.

Our legal interns will have an opportunity to conduct legal research, drafting, and analysis for our ongoing litigation and policy projects. Legal interns may also assist in public education, community engagement, advocacy, legislation, and monitoring efforts.

Law school students interested in this work are encouraged to apply. We are seeking interns for our Los Angeles and Orange County offices for the summer, fall, and spring academic terms.

ACLU SoCal's Immigrants' Rights Project accepts applications for internships on a rolling basis. Our office has been at the forefront of litigation and advocacy on a number of immigrants' rights issues. We are currently focused on three main areas: access to counsel, immigration detention, and immigration enforcement.

Our access to counsel work focuses on ensuring that no one can be deported without legal assistance and a fair hearing. J.E.F.M. v. Holder challenges the government's failure to provide appointed counsel to pro se children facing deportation. In the landmark victory in our Franco-Gonzalez v. Holder case, the Court established basic protections for immigrants with mental disabilities, including the right to appointed counsel and the right to robust competency determination procedures. We are also actively engaged in advocacy efforts regarding public funding for immigration counsel.

Our immigration detention work ensures that detained immigrants are guaranteed their basic due process rights. Jennings v. Rodriguez challenges the government's policy of detaining immigrants for prolonged periods without providing them a bond hearing and it is currently being litigated in the U.S. Supreme Court. In Hernandez v. Lynch , we seek to require the government to consider immigrants' ability to pay a bond and non-monetary alternatives in setting conditions of release. We also regularly monitor conditions in immigration detention facilities, provide individual legal assistance where possible, and advocate to reform immigration detention.

We currently are a leader in efforts to stop the entanglement of immigration and local law enforcement. We strive to ensure that law enforcement agencies do not unlawfully engage in immigration enforcement and that all individuals have equal access to immigration benefits and are not treated in a discriminatory manner. Through a recent victory in Gonzalez v. ICE , a federal judge issued a permanent injunction blocking ICE from issuing arrest requests based solely on error-ridden electronic databases. We are also challenging the government's discriminatory practices in unlawfully delaying and denying the immigration benefit applications of many Muslim individuals, under a covert program known as CARRP. See http://www.aclusocal.org/CARRP .

Our non-legal interns will have the opportunity to work on active campaigns, develop public education materials, assist with know your rights presentations to community members, attend coalition meetings, and perform drafting and data analysis for our reports.

Undergrads, law school students, and students in other academic programs are encouraged to apply. We are seeking interns for our Inland Empire, Los Angeles, and Orange County offices for the summer, fall, and spring academic terms. Preference for students with Spanish or other foreign language proficiency.

Jails Project (LA/OC)

Jails Project Los Angeles

The ACLU SoCal is soliciting applications from individuals interested in working on Los Angeles County Jails advocacy within the Criminal Justice team. The ACLU SoCal is the court-ordered monitor of conditions of confinement within all Los Angeles County jail facilities, the largest jail system in the nation.

“Conditions” refers to beds, plumbing, clothing, meals, LGBTQ+ classification, recreation, proper medical and mental health care, telephones, overcrowding, indigent kits, commissary, protective custody, religious services, mail, allegations of violence and retaliation and other similar issues that arise in custody.

Through advocacy, public education, and litigation, we work to ensure that a basic standard of care is provided to incarcerated people. We also work with community partners on county-wide decarceration efforts, including the push to close Men’s Central Jail and fund alternatives to incarceration.

This is a great learning opportunity for any student thinking about a career in law or public service that centers advocating for the justice-involved community and those who want experience providing individual assistance to incarcerated people and a window into the issues they face. All, regardless of background, are welcome to apply. People who have been impacted by incarceration in some way are particularly encouraged to apply.

Duties may include:

  • Screening written and telephone complaints by incarcerated people regarding conditions in the LA County Jails
  • Conducting in-person jails visits and/or interviews with incarcerated individuals.
  • Analyzing and inputting responses received from the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department to ensure they are responsive and meet legal standards
  • Speaking to people whose loved ones are in the LA County Jails in order to file grievances or direct them to resources
  • Assisting ACLU SoCal staff with jails conditions advocacy in community-based organizations and with the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department

If the ACLU SoCal is involved in active litigation involving those incarcerated in LA County jails, interns may assist with drafting and gathering declarations/narratives from incarcerated or previously incarcerated individuals. Those who speak, read, and write Spanish fluently would be especially helpful, but any second language can be useful.

Jails Project Orange County

The ACLU SoCal Criminal Justice/Jails Project OC team is seeking interns to assist with examining conditions in Orange County jails and advocating with people in custody and their loved ones.

“Conditions” refers to housing assignments, medical and mental health care, LGBTQIA classification, grievance system, religious services, allegations of violence and retaliation and other related issues.

Interns will assist with staffing the Incarcerated People’s Hotline, collecting narratives and declarations that may support ACLU litigation, flagging administrative advocacy issues, as well as thinking creatively about other forms of advocacy to support the campaign to stop jail expansion in OC.

Interns will be supervised by Jacob Reisberg, jails conditions and policy advocate and attorney, and Daisy Ramirez, jails conditions and policy coordinator.

Students with lived experience with the criminal legal system, previous civil rights work experience, or a demonstrated interest in civil rights work, are especially encouraged to apply.

Interns must commit to volunteer a minimum of six hours per week. Those who speak, read and write Spanish fluently would be especially helpful, but any second language can be useful.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California's (ACLU SoCal) LGBTQ, Gender, and Reproductive Justice Project (the "Project") is currently accepting applications for interns/externs to work in our Los Angeles and San Bernardino offices.

In the area of LGBTQ rights, the Project works to protect and expand the rights of LGBTQ and non-binary individuals and those living with HIV/AIDS to be free from discrimination. Our current priorities include reducing the profiling and arrests of women, LGBTQ, and non-binary people, including working towards the decriminalization of sex work; ending unfair treatment of and increasing safety of women, LGBTQ, intersex, and non-binary people in incarceration settings; ending discrimination and promoting authentic participation by LGBTQ and non-binary people in public accommodations and housing; and promoting safe and respectful treatment of LGBTQ and non-binary youth in schools.

In the areas of Reproductive Justice and Gender Equity, our current priorities include protecting and improving abortion and contraception access; creating workplace equity for workers of all genders and family responsibilities; advancing access to reproductive health care for incarcerated women; ensuring implementation of comprehensive sex education; and ending religious exemptions that permit discrimination in healthcare and other contexts.

We accomplish our goals through impact litigation, policy advocacy, activist engagement, and community organizing to enforce existing legal protections and create new ones. Law students who work in the LGBTQ, Gender, and Reproductive Justice Project will have an opportunity to conduct legal research and policy analysis, interview potential clients, participate in coalition meetings, and support lobbying efforts. Non-legal interns will typically contribute to the development and distribution of know-your-rights resources, support community organizing and outreach efforts, research facts and context for legal and policy matters, and help process Public Records Act requests.

Undergrads, law school students, and students in other academic programs are encouraged to apply. We take interns for fall, spring and summer terms.

Police Practices and National Security

The ACLU of Southern California is currently accepting applications for legal interns interested in assisting the office's police accountability, national security, and anti-Muslim discrimination work.

This office has long been a leader in changing local and national policing practices through our policy work and litigation. We focus on police use of force, racial and religious discrimination, civilian oversight and transparency, systems for police accountability and discipline, surveillance practices, counterterrorism and border policing, and police infringement on First Amendment rights.

Over the past five years, ACLU SoCal has worked with grassroots, labor and civil rights organizations to push major legislation making California's law governing police use of deadly force among the strongest in the nation, to safeguard the public's right to know about investigations into police use of force and findings of serious misconduct, and to strengthen California's prohibition on racial profiling and require collection of detailed data on every police stop made in the state. Working with our partners, we are now working on implementing and using these laws to unearth previously secret police misconduct, to help communities analyze data on stops by their local police departments, and to ensure California police agencies adopt strong policies and training on the use of deadly force.

ACLU SoCal also uses class action litigation and test cases to effect reform in a number of areas, such as:

  • Gang Injunctions. In Vasquez v. Rackauckas , we filed a class action challenging police and prosecutors' practices in enforcing gang injunctions, winning an opinion from the Ninth Circuit holding that police and prosecutors violated class member's due process to a gang injunction based on police and prosecutors' one-sided determination they were gang members, and failed to provide them meaningful notice of the reasons for the accusation they were gang members and an opportunity to be heard on their side of the story. In Youth Justice Coalition v. City of Los Angeles , we sued the City of Los Angeles for violating the requirements of Vasquez, obtaining a preliminary injunction halting the City's enforcement of gang injunctions citywide.
  • Wrongful Arrest Practices In Mitchell v. Jeffries , we successfully sued the City of Bakersfield on behalf of a young black man illegally intimidated and arrested by city police officers for asserting his constitutional right to refuse to identify himself during a police stop in which he was a passenger in a car and not suspected of any wrongdoing.
  • Right to Record In Nee v. Los Angeles Sheriff's Department , we represented three photographers detained for taking photographs in public places, in part due to training that photography could be “suspicious activity” indicative of terrorism. We won a settlement requiring policy changes that recognized and protected civilians' First Amendment right to photograph, and damages for our clients.
  • In Fazaga v. FBI , we filed a federal class action law suit against the Federal Bureau of Investigations for infiltrating mainstream mosques in Southern California and targeting Muslim Americans for surveillance because of their religion.
  • In Vayeghan v. Kelly , the ACLU of Southern California successfully represented an Iranian citizen with a valid visa denied entry to the United States following implementation of President Trump's Muslim ban.
  • In ACLU of Southern California & Electronic Frontier Foundation v. LAPD & LASD , we successfully challenged local police departments' refusal to disclose records about the use of Automated License Plate Reader (ALPR) systems — sophisticated cameras mounted on squad cars and street poles that read license plates and record the time, date, and location a particular car was encountered — under the Public Records Act.
  • In Los Angeles Police Protective League v. City of Los Angeles , we intervened in a police officer association's challenge to landmark legislation on police transparency and defeated the association's attempt to limit the new law.
  • In Winston v. City of Los Angeles , we sued the Los Angeles Police Department for systematically failing to respond to public records requests, winning a settlement that required restricting of the Department's public records response systems and new policies to ensure the preservation and timely disclosure of documents.
  • Racial Profiling. In KL v. City of Glendale , we represented high school students detained in a racially targeted gang operation, winning expungement of all information related to the operation from students files, as well as policy changes at multiple agencies to prevent similar operations from recurring.
  • Police Reform. In United States v. City of Los Angeles , we intervened on behalf of community organizations in a consent decree brought by the United States Department of Justice over the Los Angeles Police Department, and advocated for robust enforcement of provisions on racial profiling, use of force, and gang policing during more than a decade the consent decree was in effect.

Beyond our litigation and legislative work, we are also actively engaged in advocacy with municipalities and law enforcement agencies on shaping policies to govern the use of new surveillance technologies, such as body-worn cameras, and on state regulations related to policing on issues including gang databases and racial profiling data collection. In Los Angeles, we are campaigning to hold Los Angeles County Sheriff Villanueva accountable to his constituents. Our legal interns will have an opportunity to conduct legal research, drafting, and analysis for our ongoing litigation and policy projects in the national security context. Legal interns also will assist in public education, community engagement, advocacy, and legislative efforts.

Our non-legal interns will have the opportunity to work on active campaigns, develop public education materials, give know-your-rights presentations to community members, attend coalition meetings, and perform drafting and data analysis for our reports.

Undergraduates, law school students, and students in other academic programs are encouraged to apply. We are seeking interns for our Los Angeles, Kern, Orange County, and Inland Empire offices for the summer, fall, and spring academic terms.

The ACLU SoCal has periodic openings for Interns and Volunteers who, primarily, conduct pre-screening interviews on the telephone and review written requests for legal services. Volunteers and Interns will encounter a wide breadth of legal and social issues from potential clients who have various factual circumstances and communication styles. Interested participants will, necessarily, need to extract certain types of information in an efficient and customer-friendly manner. Relevant information must then be reduced into a stylized record of the interview or review and entered into a data bank system. Other responsibilities include learning about and making appropriate referrals to other legal and social services. Participants receive a procedures manual, hands-on training, and other support throughout the experience.

No legal advice is given through intake, but appropriate cases are referred to the ACLU SoCal's legal staff via a chain of supervisory reviews. Cases that are not within the ACLU SoCal's guidelines are referred to other nonprofit agencies and community resources for possible help.

Throughout the history of the program, many student interns have gone on to law school and other professional education experiences. Likewise, many of our retirees and other volunteers have remained with the program for many years. The experience is a great resume builder, as well as an engaging and continuous learning experience.

We are seeking interns for our Los Angeles office.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California (ACLU SoCal) Activist Engagement and Development (AED) team is currently accepting applications for interns to work in our Los Angeles office.

The AED team works to build relationships with our volunteer supporters, recruit supporters to advance organizational education and policy priorities, and create access and opportunities so people can take action to fight back against attacks on civil liberties and civil rights. We accomplish our goals through activist engagement and leadership development, skill and issue based trainings, pressure actions (i.e., canvassing, phone banking, canvassing, rallies, petitions, etc.), community outreach, and issue based campaign work.

Undergrads and students in other academic programs are encouraged to apply.

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Home » Internship Experiences » Internship Experience at Chamber of Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John, Delhi: Proper Guidance; Cooperative; No Stipend

Internship Experience at Chamber of Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John, Delhi: Proper Guidance; Cooperative; No Stipend

  • Tasneem Marfatiya
  • Dec 28, 2023

An intern shares their experiences of working at the Chamber of Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John. Learn more about their experience!

Name of the Student

Name and address of the organization.

Chamber of Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John

Duration of Internship

How did you apply.

I applied through the CEDE Summer Cohort.

First-Day Formalities, Infrastructure, First Impression

It was good, I had asked to come to the High Court to watch the proceedings. Everyone was cooperative. They guided me throughout the internship. Communication was direct and through email and WhatsApp groups. They make us familiar with the Court proceedings on the very first day.

  • Research work and listing the file/error etc.
  • To observe proceedings and research work.
  • Other work like checking the file according to the list of documents.
  • Drafting the summary and other legal documents.
  • Task to research criminal laws and related judgments mainly related to quashing, further investigation, defamation, etc.

Work Environment

The work environment was very friendly, cooperative, and supportive. They guided me throughout the internship. While assigning the task they direct me in the easiest way, so I can perform productively with fewer mistakes. They make us attentive throughout the internship.

Good things

  • Experienced and hard-working team.
  • Supportive and Friendly environment of working and approachable if any difficulty arises.
  • Working under the Ma’am was indeed an honour and pleasure.
  • They make us familiar with familiar court proceedings by giving us a summary of the case.

There are no bad things as such. It was really a great learning experience. Everything from learning and making oneself more worthy. Exiting work experience. They give information about what is the matter in the scheduled cases.

Accommodation & Conveyance to Office

Accommodation and Conveyance to the office were through the Metro. The office is situated in well situated area. Anyone can reach easily at the office easily. The office in near to the metro station within walking distance. You can find the address on the map easily.

There was no stipend as such but indeed great learning experience, which make it much more worthy.

This internship experience was submitted anonymously by a law student, through Aisha Raj (Lawctopus’ Campus Leader).

Disclaimer: Internship Experiences are opinions shared by individual law students and tend to be personal and subjective in nature. The internship experiences shared on Lawctopus are NOT Lawctopus' official views on the internship. We also do not edit internship experiences (except to ensure readability) to ensure that the intern's voice remains intact.

Disclaimer: Organisations should not influence interns to write internship experiences on Lawctopus. Neither should they make writing an internship experience on Lawctopus mandatory for the intern to get a certificate. Indulging in such practices will lead to the organization getting blacklisted from Lawctopus. In case of any such instance, interns are requested to inform at [email protected]

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2 Responses

Hello, Could you please provide me the email ID of Adv. Rebecca Ma’am or her assistant? I will be looking forward to your reply. Thank you. Regards, Ishika.

Please check the SCBA website.

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Don’t let the value of your trip/slip-and-fall case slip away

Your litigation plan must include establishing client credibility in addition to liability and damages.

For those of us in the personal-injury arena, the vast majority have come across a slip or trip-and-fall case. These cases can pose serious challenges; however, with a proper work up, they can yield fantastic results.

For one reason or another, of the very few cases where I have had client-credibility issues, nearly all originated from slip or trip-and-fall cases. While I am not implying that every client who walks in your door from a fall is lying, you must do your due diligence up front. Every case I take, I work it up with the thought that it will end up in front of a jury. Subpoena all medical records of any doctor they have visited, comb through their medical records, and run a claim check to see what lawsuits they have filed. Be up front when you first meet your clients and tell them that if they are not forthcoming about how the incident occurred or any of their prior medical issues, their case could very well end up being a zero or a jury could provide them with a fraction of the case value even if they have a legitimate claim and are really hurt. If there is one thing a jury dislikes, it is a plaintiff who is not forthcoming. Jurors will invariably punish you for a client who lies.

Your first meeting with your clients should not be your last. You should spend time with your clients at home with their friends and family. I always insist on breaking bread with my client at some point before the deposition and absolutely before trial. Take the time to learn your client’s personal history; you will be amazed at what you will learn and how that will change how you feel about your client. If you are not ready to go to bat for them after that, then you need to seriously consider associating in another trial attorney or dropping the client.

I know I make snap judgments of my clients and quickly begin to assess the value of the case based in part on my client’s character. This kind of thinking can be hurtful to your case and your practice. As good as I think my intuition may be, it is a mistake to rely on those snap judgments. My client is more than just a number and it is crucial that I see my client’s true value as a human. For starters, no individual is perfect, which is why it is important to look past the client’s so-called character defects. Some people think that if their plaintiff has a checkered past with the law or has had substance-abuse problems, that automatically makes the case less valuable. That is not necessarily true. Criminal-defense lawyers have the ability to find the most redeeming qualities in their clients. If they can bring out the best in their defendants, we surely can do it with our plaintiffs. All it takes is a little time and compassion. After all, we are in the business of helping people.

Pre-litigation

As soon as you learn of the slip-and-fall incident send a preservation-of-evidence letter to the entity where the incident took place. Grocery stores and retail establishments are notorious for “losing” video surveillance of your client and of the incident. You need to be prepared to fight this issue. If you have never sent a preservation letter, you can find a sample on CAALA’s listserv. You want to set up the defense for a spoliation-of-evidence issue before or at the time of trial. I can count the cases on one hand where the defense actually provides the video of the incident.

Site inspection

You do not have to give defendant notice of a site inspection. I prefer to send my expert to the site of the incident without the defendant knowing. There is nothing improper about a covert inspection. The element of surprise may yield useful information before the defendant takes subsequent remedial measures. Evidence from these inspections is absolutely admissible. If applicable, make sure the expert takes all necessary photos, measurements, and testing. Of course you run the risk of having your expert removed from the site, but this has yet to happen. If you have a good expert, then he or she should have no problem conducting the covert site inspection. In addition to having my expert go on a “non-noticed” site inspection, I also want them to go on a noticed site inspection where I specifically request to see the video surveillance room and each video monitor for all cameras in the store. I want to know exactly where any and all cameras point in the store. The most common defense argument other than we “lost” the video or it was “overwritten” is that the camera where the incident took place “did not capture” the area where the plaintiff fell. If you have a slip-and-fall incident make sure to consult with a safety expert to determine whether floor testing should be conducted. The vast majority of the time, if the floor is not slippery when the substance is on the floor, then you may have serious issues with liability.

Depositions and discovery

Before any depositions I propound focused discovery asking for all safety manuals, sweep sheets, timecards, policies and procedures manuals, videos of the incident, the plaintiff, and employees conducting their sweeps, prior history of customer or employee injuries, or anything that the defendant uses to train or instruct its employees on safety, inspection, repair, maintenance, and preservation of evidence. I have yet to find a defendant who has actually produced all of the material in their possession as requested in discovery. Follow up with a meet and confer on these issues and be prepared to file a motion to compel. If you are in Los Angeles Superior Court you will have to go through an informal discovery meeting short of filing a formal motion.

Some people like to take a minimalist approach to depositions and the number of employees they depose. I think it is important to depose any employee with information about the incident as well as the person most knowledgeable about all policies relating to maintenance, inspection, repairs, safety, video surveillance, asset protection, and personal injury claims. There may not be a person for each of those positions and often times there is overlap from the above positions. These depositions can produce a plethora of useful information you can use to settle your case or inflame a jury during trial.

It is important to videotape the depositions of employees so you can use it at the time of trial. If you are low on funds, you can set up your own camera and videotape the deposition. You can do this for any employee or witness other than experts. With experts, you need to hire a professional videographer.

I study all of the discovery that the defendant produces and draft focused rule statements, starting from a very general rule to more specific rules. There are several pieces of literature that advocate for using this strategy, most notably by attorney Rick Friedman. If you study the handbooks and manuals produced by the defendant, you will be able to lift rule statements directly from the book. I also take a “pop quiz” approach in my depositions to set up defendant employees. I try to test the employee or person most knowledgeable (PMK) by asking them about all the rules that the defendant had to follow in the incident involving the plaintiff. It is amazing how little employees know about their stores and how they operate. The purpose of doing this is to set up the defendant and show that their employees are poorly trained and do not know how to implement the most basic rules that are in place to keep the corporate store safe. After quizzing the defendant employee, I then ask whether he or she agrees with my rule statements. Almost always, the employee agrees with each of the rule statements. Later at trial, I can show a jury every rule the defendant violated and point to that as the cause of the plaintiff’s injuries. These are important because the jury instruction only requires the defendant to act reasonably. The word “reasonable” is ambiguous on its face and its meaning changes depending on the situation. Rule statements also help concretize the negligent act.

If there is no video of the incident, you must question the defendant’s employees and person most knowledgeable on the issue. You may get a host of answers all of which are attempts by the defendant to skirt the issue. Make sure to ask the “who,” “what,” “when,” “where,” “why” and “how” questions and continuously follow up during the deposition. Nearly all corporate entities have a procedure in place where they must obtain the video and then send it to corporate headquarters. It is very rare that you will get an employee to admit they destroyed the video. Nearly all of the time, you need to find the person that was in charge of preserving the video and question him or her on the issue and bring up the preservation letter you sent when you initially got the case along with discovery responses indicating there is no video.

Notice of the dangerous condition

Sweep sheets, timecards, video footage of cleaning, oh my! Does your case have a sweep sheet that was signed one minute before the incident? Is this one of those anomalies where the defendant actually produces a video of their employees sweeping or your client taking a spill? Don’t worry because the defendant may still be on notice and liable.

Let’s start with the sweep sheet. First, sweep sheets, as we all know, are very easy to fabricate. There was a recent case where a defendant produced sweep sheets, claiming they swept the floor every thirty minutes. They actually produced video footage and no employee was seen sweeping or walking the floor for hours. Instead, the employee who signed the sweep sheet was busy on her phone in the office. This happens all too often, so don’t worry if the defendant produced a sweep sheet; it may not necessarily prove anything. You can also cross- reference the timecards with the sweep sheet. There have been instances where the person signing the sweep sheet does not match up with the time he or she worked; that’s another nail in the coffin for the defendant.

Now, assume the worst-case scenario where defendant produces a video showing an employee sweeping the area, a few minutes later a customer spills water on the floor, and your client is seen walking by the water, slipping and hitting the floor. The defendant will claim there is no way they could have known of the dangerous condition and they did everything reasonable to prevent the dangerous condition. There is one major way to overcome this scenario, but you have to establish a few things.

First, the floor must be slippery when wet. Have an expert go out and test the condition and determine the type of flooring the defendant uses. Some stores actually have slip-resistant floors, but the vast majority does not. Second, you must establish in deposition or discovery that employees have knowledge that water or other substances regularly get on the floor. You should also be able to get a history of past slip or trip-and-falls where an employee or customer fell on water or another substance. Most defendants will not produce this during your initial discovery requests, but follow up when you paper them with a motion. This proves that the defendant knows their floor gets wet and that it has happened before. The key here is that the defendant knows the following: 1) their floor is slippery when wet and is thus a dangerous condition; 2) they know they have had prior incidents where people have slipped on water; and 3) they choose to maintain a floor which is not slip resistant when wet.

If you hire a qualified expert, they will be able to testify that the defendant’s floor was dangerous and no inspection system would be sufficient to alleviate that danger to customers and employees. The proper action by the defendant would be to maintain slip resistant floors. The cost of changing a corporate entity’s floor is generally significantly less than the cost of your plaintiff’s injuries. The key to this argument is that you shift the notice and dangerous condition from the particular spill to the entire flooring.

Jury selection

Everyone has their own style and method for voir dire; however, there are a few key themes that you need to address. Responsibility is one of the biggest themes in these types of cases. You essentially have a big corporation that is refusing to take responsibility, cutting corners, and putting innocent customers in danger. Feel free to talk to jurors about their general expectations of safety for the various stores in which they shop. They will be forthcoming about what they expect and many of them will provide insight on how to prove your case. Some stores or companies are seen in a negative light by jurors while others are jurors’ favorite place to shop. I have been concerned about this issue before, wondering if jurors will give the defendant corporation a free pass because they “love that store.” Rather than panicking, you should be prepared to deal with this issue. One approach is to agree with the juror and let them know that you in fact love the store as well, which is why it is so concerning. The last thing you would want is this to happen to you or anyone else that loves these stores. If in fact one of these stores happens to be breaking the rules, it would actually be in all our benefit that the store shape up and take responsibility. Since we all shop there, we should help hold the store accountable when it fails to take responsibility. We want it to be safe for our families when they shop there and to walk out in the same condition as they walked in.

I have always believed that the majority of cases are won after opening statement. This is no different in premises-liability cases. One important component is setting up the dichotomy of good versus evil. It is crucial that you show all the ways the corporation knew it was violating rules, cutting corners, and refusing to accept any responsibility. You can list a few of the most important rules that they should follow and include industry standards and their own policies and procedures. If they played hardball and “lost” the video or failed to document critical information, punish them for that in opening. Talk about your client in opening and discuss his or her goals. What were they going to do with their life had defendant not been careless? But for the defendant’s careless actions, the plaintiff would be on their way to completing his or her dreams. Understanding those goals and dreams and the value of them comes from learning your client. As I mentioned earlier, this is an ongoing process and you should be prepared to speak about your client’s dreams as if they were your own.

If you videotaped the deposition of the defendant’s employees, then you can play them during your opening. Make sure you give opposing counsel proper notice and the page and lines you intend on playing at opening. Most of the time, witnesses are not as prepared for deposition as they are for trial and it shows. Facial expressions and awkwardly long pauses are sometimes worth a thousand words and have a greater impact on a jury than the witnesses’ testimony at trial.

Attack the defendant’s experts. The reason the defendant hired experts is to attack your client’s credibility and avoid responsibility. Liability experts are there to establish an excuse for the defendant’s conduct and you must address that in opening. As for damages experts, particularly medical experts, regardless of the medicine behind their opinion, they are ultimately saying the plaintiff is not as hurt which is another way of implying your client is lying.

I generally call the defendant’s employees in my case and chief right from the start so I can establish all the bad acts and broken rules. With each employee witness, establish all the important rules the defendant must have followed and show the jury how the defendant broke each and every rule. One of my favorite questions to ask employees is whether they learned anything from the incident. It is a double-edged sword because if they answer in the affirmative, then we know they failed to do something; if they deny it, then the jury will punish them for being disingenuous. You have to make sure to address any missing video, hidden evidence, or discovery abuse. These bad-faith acts by the defendant only anger jurors and establish the defendant’s betrayal.

This is the time to go over what actually happened during the trial. Do not just rehash what you said in opening. Make sure to address the verdict form and go over the jury instructions. If the defendant claimed they lost or misplaced the videotape or provides some other dubious excuse, you have to make sure you use the following CACI jury instructions: “203 Party Having Power to Produce Better Evidence” and “204 Willful Suppression of Evidence.” If you were unsuccessful at getting terminating sanction for the lost or misplaced video before trial, you will almost certainly be able to get a jury instruction for willful suppression. It is imperative that you discuss these instructions with the jury and inform them that the defendant could have absolved themselves from liability had they just shown us the video. We all know that if someone was caught stealing, even if it was for a pair of underwear or a can of soda, they would have the video. When it comes to asset protection, they are on top of it, but conveniently lose the video when your plaintiff gets hurt. Hit them hard for this and hammer it home throughout the trial, not just in closing.

Premises cases lend themselves wonderfully to community arguments without violating the so-called “Golden Rule” argument. Address this issue once again as you did in voir dire and opening. We want the stores and places we visit to be safe for everyone, including the healthy and disabled, weak, and strong, as well as the young and old. If a corporation wants to make money off the people in our community, then it must play by the rules and the only way they will listen is with a jury verdict.

Thomas Steven Feher

Thomas Steven Feher is an associate trial attorney at The Simon Law Group, LLP . In just under three years he has tried over a dozen cases, including auto-accident cases, dog bites, premises-liability cases, and products liability. Thomas received his J.D. and Certificate in Dispute Resolution from Pepperdine. Before law school he obtained a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, political science, and philosophy from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Copyright © 2024 by the author. For reprint permission, contact the publisher: Advocate Magazine

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Sergey Abashin

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GIADA MARRA

Leon Battista Alberti si assume il compito di esplorare la logica interna del linguaggio pittorico, di indagarne la coerenza e ricercarne le leggi. Volge l’attenzione a determinare e ordinare gli elementi costitutivi, non ancora mai illuminati, dell'atto figurativo che si proponga di imitare o riprodurre la realtà visibile. Il testo ha così le caratteristiche di una guida alla creazione artistica, ma mira nello stesso tempo a far comprendere meglio un'opera di pittura. Alberti si pone subito il problema di delimitare il campo specifico della pittura, che definisce così: Nam ea solum imitari studet pictor quae sub luce videantur («Infatti il pittore s’ingegna solamente d’imitare le cose che si vedono alla luce»). È il concetto, precisato e arricchito, su cui egli torna a scrivere all'inizio del terzo libro, quasi per riassumere, verso la chiusa del testo, il suo pensiero. «Compito del pittore è tracciare con linee e dipingere con colori qualsivoglia dato corpo su una superficie così che, ad una certa distanza e stabilita la precisa posizione del raggio centrico, ogni cosa che tu vedi dipinta appaia con lo stesso rilievo e molto simile al corpo dato». Inoltre quando esorta chi voglia eccellere nell'arte pittorica a far uso del velo, può scrivere: picturam expectamus eam quae maxime prominens et datis corporibus persimilis videatur («ci aspettiamo una pittura che sembri molto in rilievo e molto simile ai corpi dati»). In Alberti naturale e ferma è la volontà di una pittura che tenda a imitare le cose reali e a rappresentare le cose viste. Ma l'osservazione diretta dovrà fissarsi e saldarsi in una forma compiuta e chiara: «Sarà adunque pittura non altro che intersegazione della pirramide visiva, sicondo data distanza, posto il centro e constituiti i lumi, in una certa superficie con linee e colori artificiose representata».

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Media can be used in almost any discipline to enhance learning both in class and also for out-of-class assignments. Use media is a great tool to lead students to real-world examples. Using media engages students, aids student retention of knowledge, motivates interest in the subject matter, and illustrates the relevance of many concepts. Using media is the key to moving students to higher-level thinking. Teaching is considered to be an art. The use of media in teaching-learning process is not a new thing. Many teachers know that media will be helpful. Media give students something new, but not all of teachers know how to implement it correctly, so sometimes media disturb learning process instead of helping students in learning process. This article provides a teacher's experience in implementing media for teaching social study.

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Legal Bites

Internship Experience@ Chambers of Advocate J.B Sharma,Panipat

Name, college, year of study, email id  nikita kaushik, a second-year student at geeta institute of law. e-mail id- [email protected] name of organisation chambers of j.b sharma chamber no. :295 3rd floor lawyer’s chamber complex, district court, panipat. team strength j.b sir has six associates and two researchers who work for him in an office big enough to… read more ».

Name, College, Year of Study, Email ID

Nikita Kaushik, a Second-year student at Geeta Institute of Law.

E-mail id- [email protected]

Name of Organisation

Chambers of J.B Sharma Chamber no. :295 3rd floor lawyer’s Chamber complex, District court, Panipat.

Team Strength

J.B sir has six associates and two researchers who work for him in an office big enough to accommodate 12 people. While I was interning there were 5 other interns at the office.

Application Process

I came in contact with J.B sharma sir through one of my friends. I had contacted sir only based on the aforementioned friend’s experience. The influx of internship applications increase by day and I personally saw sir refuse a few applicants. I suggest you apply at least 3 months in advance. You can apply by sending a mail to me.

Duration of internship and timings

I interned for a month from the 06-7-2016 to 26-72016. The work hours are just like any other office where litigation is taken seriously. The day begins in court at 10 am and if there are no post-lunch matters then get ready for a hard day at the office till at least 8 pm. J.B sir does not force anyone to stay beyond that. Every intern is allowed to leave at any time they wish. But that does not mean the internship is lenient. J.B sir wouldn’t disallow you to leave but he has a keen eye and if you default regularly. If you do that, you can forget about leaving a good impression. There’s no time boundation per se, but real learning would only happen if you stay and work harder than you can. There were interns who used to leave by 8 pm, and there were ones who stayed until 11 pm at times. It’s up to the intern how much effort he/she is willing to put in.

First Impression

The first day at work was an eventful one. I was asked to turn up at small Court. I met J.B sir outside the courtroom and was asked to accompany him to the dais as our matter, was up for hearing. It’s a privilege to observe J.B sir argue. While the other lawyer was getting thrown off his game whenever the judge intervened, sir maintained his calm and always composed himself before beginning his argument. He’d also make sure he wouldn’t speak anything if the judge wasn’t paying attention to the counsels. Outside the court, I was asked to carry a file and a diary of dates. He carried another file and another diary. He could have easily given me the other file and the other diary as well. He treats you like a fellow human being which is (sadly) rather difficult to observe these days. After the other matter we drove to the office in his car. CRPC While I had a vague idea to the answer to every question, he remembered every section down to the last word. I learned more in that car ride than I do in a month of classes at college.

Tasks can vary from going through case files and marking statements for the purpose of cross-examinations to taking notes in a client meeting and drafting a Written Statement based on the information received from the client. Since the intern would get to draft he is allowed to clarify any doubts he might have. The intern would email the draft to one of the associates who would make the necessary changes and finally, it would reach sir who’d scrutinize it. The task allotted would depend upon the intern. If the intern is capable of a task of difficulty X, sir would allow the intern with the task of difficulty X+1. He’d always be there for clarifications but would never give you the entire answer. How else would you learn?

Several times I was asked to research a certain topic and when done I would be quizzed on it. The questions are to test the whether the knowledge is from understanding or from mere reading.

Work environment and people

The office felt like home on the first day itself. J.B sir would make you laugh all the time and while the associates (especially Anoop sir) would not look at you while they are working, but the moment they get free you’d get to laugh more because the ambiance is just damn friendly. There’s no reason anybody would feel out-of-place at the office. Always be ready for random legal gyaan coming your way from someone or the other in the office! If you make mistakes, there’s no reason to be scared of a quintessential legal scolding. J.B sir believes in giving second chances. He’ll explain you where you were wrong and how to correct it. If you mess up often, he’d stay mum but you’d be losing his trust one mistake at a time. Throughout the day sir will interact with you, ask you about yourself and share his own stories, both legal and personal in nature.

Best things

The work ranges from all facts of law. You’ll find yourself in heaps of work. You’d also get to draft which is a massive learning experience in itself. Bad things The timings can be of issue to some interns. #Litigation

I did not get stipend

Accommodation

I am from Panipat so that was not an issue.

Biggest Lessons

Drafting is to litigation what an engine is to a vehicle. Pardon me for the terrible analogy but cheers if you get the point.

Mayank Shekhar

Mayank Shekhar

Mayank is an alumnus of the prestigious Faculty of Law, Delhi University. Under his leadership, Legal Bites has been researching and developing resources through blogging, educational resources, competitions, and seminars.

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LEAP Report: Cities Leading Way on Bird-Friendly Building Policies

A black-and-white warbler on blue metal window ledge on the exterior of a building

A new report published today by the Law, Ethics and Animals Program  (LEAP) at Yale Law School in partnership with American Bird Conservancy (ABC) reveals how local laws and policies are speeding up protections for birds from deadly building collisions. The first-of-its-kind report, Building Safer Cities for Birds: How Cities Are Leading the Way on Bird-Friendly Building Policy , considers how city policies can accelerate the adoption of bird-friendly building design at scale to significantly reduce avian mortality. 

“A growing number of U.S. cities and counties have emerged as leaders in advancing bird-friendly building design and practice over the past two decades, in the absence of federal and state action to reduce bird collisions,” said LEAP Executive Director and Research Scholar Viveca Morris , a co-author of the report. “This report highlights examples and studies the effectiveness of municipalities at the forefront of the bird-friendly building movement, with the hope that their examples can inspire and inform efforts to protect birds from unnecessary collisions elsewhere.” 

A staggering number of birds are killed by window collisions each year in the United States, with estimates of up to 1 billion individuals. ABC, a leading authority on preventing bird collisions , partnered with LEAP on the policy study, with four of its experts contributing to the report: Bryan Lenz, Kaitlyn Parkins, Christine Sheppard, and Anikó Tótha.

The research identified key lessons learned from the experiences of cities that have already passed bird-friendly laws to empower other cities to design more effective policies. The report also features five in-depth case studies of municipal policies passed in New York, New York; Arlington County, Virginia; Madison, Wisconsin; Cupertino, California; and San Francisco, California. Nearly two dozen policymakers, advocates, glass manufacturers, architects, scientists, and community members involved in designing, implementing or working on local policies were interviewed for the report.

Since 2008, more than 20 U.S. cities and municipalities have enacted bird-friendly building policies. At least three bird-friendly building laws were passed this summer, including in Washington, D.C., and the states of Maryland and Maine. 

Report Cover: Building Safer Cities for Birds: How Cities Are Leading the Way on Bird-Friendly Building Policy

“Policies are critical tools, because they have wide impacts, often beyond their local area. We don’t have the luxury of addressing this problem one building at a time,” said Christine Sheppard, ABC’s Glass Collisions Program Director. Sheppard helped develop ABC’s official rating system for measuring threats to birds posed by different building materials — a standard that is now used in many bird-friendly building policies. Commonly approved bird-friendly materials include treatments for glass like fritting and etching, exterior insect screens, exterior blinds, and architectural features that shield large sheets of glass. 

According to the report, city bird-friendly building policies vary in scope, design, and comprehensiveness. Existing laws share many of the same limitations, such as those in California that limit regulations to only areas deemed “bird-sensitive” near green spaces and waterways. However, studies show that birds make diffuse use of all parts of urban and suburban environments, so restricting bird-friendly building design to “urban bird refuges” or “bird sensitive areas” falls short of current understandings of the wide-ranging threat of window collisions that birds face throughout the built environment. Most policies include lighting provisions to reduce light pollution, which is also a key contributor to bird collisions. None of the bird-friendly building policies studied apply retroactively to existing buildings. 

“New rules and innovative strategies for mitigating existing building stocks are urgently needed, especially at high-collisions buildings,” explained Meredith Barges , Yale MDiv ’23, coauthor of the study and co-chair of Lights Out Connecticut . “The types of building renovations that trigger most laws will not happen fast enough to save many threatened birds in the decades ahead.”

Local governments could use a range of financial incentives and regulatory policies to advance the adoption of new building technologies by developers and homeowners. One successful example highlighted in the report includes Arlington County, which incentivized bird-friendly architecture in 2020 by adopting a density bonus requirement through its Green Building Incentive Program . Many other policy tools, such as expedited review and permitting, have yet to be attempted to incentivize the adoption of bird-friendly building materials.

Bird-friendly design can be successfully integrated into green-building policy incentives, according to the report. An estimated 80 percent of U.S. buildings today will still be standing in 2050. Since buildings are responsible for up to 60 percent of carbon emissions, retrofitting buildings for energy efficiency has been widely identified as a critical for climate change mitigation and adaptation. Incorporating bird-friendly building practices into the current once-in-a-generation transformation of cityscapes through net-zero and/or green legislation is probably the best opportunity to accomplish large-scale installation of bird collision deterrence measures, especially because glass is often replaced to improve energy efficiency, according to Morris and Barges.

The report’s findings show that bird collisions prevention can be simple and inexpensive when following recommended science, technology, and standards. The report’s authors and contributors hope its conclusions will inform and inspire better local policies in the future to protect birds from preventable collision-related injuries and avoidable deaths.

Building Safer Cities for Birds: How Cities Are Leading the Way on Bird-Friendly Building Policy is a publication of the Yale Bird-Friendly Building Initiative , which aims to accelerate the development and adoption of bird-friendly building design. The Yale Bird-Friendly Building Initiative is a collaboration of the Law, Ethics and Animals Program (LEAP) at Yale Law School, the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, the Yale Office of Sustainability, and American Bird Conservancy. The Yale Bird-Friendly Building Initiative is supported by a seed grant from the Yale University Planetary Solutions Project , a campus-wide initiative aimed at addressing complex environmental crises such as climate change and biodiversity loss.

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  3. Appointment Letter as a Visiting Advocate at NLU Dwarka

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COMMENTS

  1. 515544916-Chamber-Visit

    qqqqq report on observation on lawyers chamber visit we attended advocate kajal chambers on the 23 rd of march, 2021 and she very pleasingly explained how to. Skip to document. ... and Live Law for being up to date with the Law world. Small chambers don't really matter, but, if there are corporate meetings or arbitration meetings the advocate ...

  2. Report On Observation On Lawyer Chamber

    Report on Observation on Lawyer Chamber - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. The virtual visit summarized the career opportunities and advice provided by Advocate Neha Dhuru. She emphasized that law is a versatile career that requires strong knowledge, public speaking skills, and hard work.

  3. Report On Observation On Lawyers Chamber Visit

    Chamber Visit - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Advocate Kajal Solanki's chambers were visited on March 23rd, 2021. She explained how important it is to maintain a professional office space and attire. She also stressed that lawyers should focus on a specific type of case they feel comfortable handling.

  4. Internship Diary Mohsin

    Name of Advocate : DINESH KUMAR Area of Practice : Civil and Criminal Court : Delhi High Court and District Court Chamber : Lawyer's Chamber No. P-38, Post Office Lane, Tis Hazari Court, New Delhi 110054 Duration of Internship : 1 st July 2019 to 31 st July 2019 Name of the Student : MOHSIN Section: F College : CAMPUS LAW CENTRE Exam Roll ...

  5. The ultimate guide for law students to write a perfect field visit report

    Brief introduction — This part explains what the report is about. It includes background information and theoretical perspectives applied during the visit. Objectives — Students can use the section to explain the goals and objectives of the field visit, such as observing court proceedings or analyzing practices by law enforcement officers. Each observation must appear in a separate ...

  6. Chamber Visit

    The purpose of the visit from the student's perspective can be generally derived as follows: To gain practical and insightful knowledge from the learned advocates. To ask relevant law related and career related questions. Questioning about the current situation of the legal field. Asking about the challenges faced, not only by the learned ...

  7. A Comprehensive Internship Diary for Law Students

    The journey in the law student internship diary begins with a title page that encapsulates the essence of your internship experience. Include details such as the name of the law firm or organisation, the duration of the internship and your personal details. Table of Contents. Create a comprehensive table of contents that serves as a roadmap for ...

  8. Remembering Ram Jethmalani: What a young law student who interned with

    A year after the legendary lawyer's passing, one of his former interns who is a lawyer herself, recalls all the lessons she learnt from her mentor and about his larger than life personality. My first meeting with Ram Sir was as a law student — one who considers herself extremely fortunate to get an opportunity to intern with a legal legend ...

  9. Essay on visit to advocate office

    Essay on advocate chamber visit for 30 days , i need help for making report. Raj Kumar Makkad (Adv P & H High Court Chandigarh) 08 April 2020. This topic can be visualized as long as you desire. Start from the expectations/mindset or presumption when you had to visit a lawyer;s chamber for the first time. Give words to your thought and when you ...

  10. (DOC) Advocate Visits

    No. of days/week. Timings Monday to Friday. Interns usually would report to the court at 11am and are free by 5pm First impression. First day, formalities etc. On the first day of the internship, we were asked to report to office at 3 pm for an orientation. The plush grand office will be one of the best law offices, you will ever see.

  11. COURT DIARY / INTERNSHIP REPORT

    The document appears to be a project or report on legal ethics from a law student. It includes the following sections: 1. An introduction to legal ethics and its significance. 2. Areas where legal ethics apply, including conflicts of interest, confidentiality, advertising, fees, criminal cases, and globalization. 3.

  12. Legal/Advocacy Internships, Externships & Volunteer Opportunities

    Throughout the history of the program, many student interns have gone on to law school and other professional education experiences. Likewise, many of our retirees and other volunteers have remained with the program for many years. The experience is a great resume builder, as well as an engaging and continuous learning experience.

  13. Summer Internship Report

    summer internship report.docx - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. The document summarizes Saurabh Singh's internship report from his summer internship with advocate Sheo Ram Singh at the Allahabad High Court from June 11th to July 10th. It includes a day-by-day account of Saurabh's activities and learnings, which involved ...

  14. Internship Experience at Chambers of Advocate Anil Pratap Singh

    An intern shares her experience of working at a chamber of advocate Anil Pratap Singh, former chairman of Bar Council of Uttar Pradesh, in May 2019. She learned about criminal, civil, consumer and income tax law, drafting, research and court proceedings.

  15. Internship Experience at Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John

    An intern shares their experiences of working at the Chamber of Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John. Learn more about their experience! Name of the Student. Anonymous. Name and Address of the Organization. Chamber of Senior Advocate Rebecca Mammen John. Duration of Internship. 1 Month. How did you Apply? I applied through the CEDE Summer Cohort.

  16. A five-point guide to digitise an Advocate's office

    While law firms have enough resources to commission professionals to perform this task, stand-alone law offices are perplexed with the situation. This post is a five-point guide to stand-alone law offices who seek to digitise their office (along with possible costs). 1. Implement CPBH. Reading a PDF file for one time reference is different from ...

  17. PDF FAQs Study in a Law Office or Judge's Chamber

    If you completed law study at an accredited or registered law school prior to beginning the LOS Program, it is suggested to obtain a legal education evaluation. As a part of the evaluation process , you are required to provide those official, sealed law school transcripts. The Office of Admissions will evaluate your prior completed law study to

  18. Don't let the value of your trip/slip-and-fall case slip away

    Premises cases lend themselves wonderfully to community arguments without violating the so-called "Golden Rule" argument. Address this issue once again as you did in voir dire and opening. We want the stores and places we visit to be safe for everyone, including the healthy and disabled, weak, and strong, as well as the young and old.

  19. Internship report on law chamber.pdf

    3 | P a g e Preface This report is an outcome of the full placement Program. The presented report is about internship program from May 27 to July 18, 2016 In which two terms of internship program are combined. In this report and during internship the main focus had been on differences among theory we'd read and practical we'd been doing during this internship program.

  20. (DOC) Court Visit report

    But the factor that surprised me the most from my visit to the courtroom was, the minimal use of precedent. The Indian legal system is one of common law, which suggests that much emphasis is placed on the precedents and case law. 07 REPORT ON COURT ROOM OBSERVATION As a part of my Practical Training of final year.

  21. Internship Experience@ Chambers of Advocate J.B Sharma,Panipat

    By Mayank Shekhar Published on 11 March 2017 5:51 AM GMT. Name, College, Year of Study, Email ID Nikita Kaushik, a Second-year student at Geeta Institute of Law. E-mail id- [email protected] Name of Organisation Chambers of J.B Sharma Chamber no. :295 3rd floor lawyer's Chamber complex, District court, Panipat.

  22. Court visit and internship diary highlights

    internship diary - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free.

  23. Legislative Activity

    The Cupertino City Council makes legislative decisions that align with the City's best interest. From 2019 to 2022, the Legislative Review Committee (LRC) was primarily responsible for making recommendations on legislative advocacy. On February 21, 2023 the City Council adopted Resolution No. 23-026, which dissolved the LRC and established a ...

  24. LEAP Report: Cities Leading Way on Bird-Friendly Building Policies

    A new report published today by the Law, Ethics and Animals Program (LEAP) at Yale Law School in partnership with American Bird Conservancy (ABC) reveals how local laws and policies are speeding up protections for birds from deadly building collisions. The first-of-its-kind report, Building Safer Cities for Birds: How Cities Are Leading the Way on Bird-Friendly Building Policy, considers how ...

  25. Weekend Edition Sunday for June, 16 2024 : NPR

    Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here ...