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travel to slovakia to work

  • Business and industry

Travel to Slovakia for work

Check if you need a visa or permit to work in Slovakia and how to get one if you do.

This guide is for British citizens travelling for business or other work purposes. It explains what employers, employees, or the self-employed need to do if they need a visa or permit.

This information is provided as a guide only. You must always check the exact application process and document requirements with Slovakia’s embassy or immigration authorities .

Entry requirements

If you’re going to Slovakia to work (or any other EU country , Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein) you must make sure you meet passport and other travel requirements .

Slovakia is in the Schengen area . If you’re travelling for business for up to 90 days in a 180-day period, you may be able to do some business-related activities without needing a visa or permit, such as attend business meetings. It does not matter how many countries you visit in the Schengen area. Your total stay must be no more than 90 days in every 180 days. The 180-day period keeps ‘rolling’.

If you’re staying for longer, or for other types of work, you may need a visa or permit.

The Slovakian authorities are responsible for setting and enforcing entry rules. They decide which activities need a visa or permit, or which may be exempt.

You must always check with Slovakia’s embassy or immigration authorities before you travel, to make sure you meet their legal requirements.

If you’re working in more than one country, you need to check the entry rules of each country.

If you need a passport, visa or permit, you should apply well in advance of travel.

Visa and permit documents

This guide explains the general application process for some of the visa or permit types available in Slovakia. It includes a checklist of documents that you’ll usually need to include when applying.

It may not cover all scenarios so you must always check the exact application process and document requirements with Slovakia’s embassy or immigration authorities .

You must also check what format the documents should be presented in, including if they must be:

  • ‘legalised’ (with an apostille) or notarised
  • originals, or if copies are acceptable
  • signed in ink (a wet signature), or if they can be signed electronically (an e-signature)
  • dated within a certain period of time, such as 90 days before you submit your application

Countries often use the terms visa, work permit and residence permit differently. For example, some may refer to a work permit as a visa.

This guide uses the same terms used in Slovakia, so you know which ones to use when speaking to Slovakia’s authorities.

Check if you need a visa or permit

You do not need a visa or permit if you’re travelling to Slovakia for up to 90 days in a 180-day period for specific business-related activities. These activities can include:

  • running or attending job interviews
  • going to court as witness
  • attending trade fairs
  • attending board meetings
  • meeting clients or customers (including entertainment like eating at a restaurant)
  • meeting colleagues, contractors or sellers
  • fact-finding visits
  • negotiating, signing or executing deals or contracts
  • attending, speaking or presenting at a conference
  • attending entertainment functions
  • team-building activities
  • supervising the work of a vendor or contractor
  • supervising or managing a team
  • completing internal audits for your company
  • follow-up work after a business meeting
  • leisure travel, such as holidays or visiting friends or family

These activities are usually allowed while travelling under the Schengen visa waiver .

Border checks

At the border, you may be asked to show:

  • proof of return travel, such as plane or train tickets
  • health insurance that covers your entire stay
  • proof of accommodation for your entire stay
  • enough money for the duration of your trip
  • an invitation letter from your employer explaining your trip

Register with the Slovakian police

If you plan to stay for more than 72 hours (even as a tourist) you must complete a notice of stay form . You give this to the ‘ Foreign Police ’ or post it to them within 3 days of arriving in the country.

If you’re staying in a hotel or rented accommodation the accommodation provider will do this for you.

Check Slovakia’s exemptions

Certain types of work and activities do not require a visa or permit because they’re exempt.

All countries have their own exemptions. What may be exempt in one country may not be in another. You should always check with the country’s authorities.

You may not need a visa or permit if you’re in Slovakia for up to 90 days because you’re:

  • working in international transport services
  • delivering goods or services as part of a commercial contract
  • carrying out installation work, a warranty service or repairs under a commercial contract
  • programming, installing or setting up a system under a commercial contract
  • receiving or providing professional training under a commercial contract
  • carrying out seasonal work in agriculture, forestry, fishery, industrial production, construction or in accommodation and catering services
  • working as a professional sportsperson
  • providing healthcare services
  • volunteering
  • working as a journalist accredited in Slovakia
  • working within the scope of an international treaty
  • working for a company registered as a significant investor in Slovakia by the Ministry of Economy
  • an executive of a company
  • a member of the armed forces or rescue team
  • posted (transferred) by an EU-registered company

You may not need a visa or permit if you’re in Slovakia for up to 30 days in a year if you’re:

  • an artist taking part in an artistic event
  • working in science, education and learning and taking part in a scientific event – such as researchers, sociologists, chemists, and teachers

You’re allowed to have an employment relationship, but it can’t be for more than 30 days.

Notifying the labour office

If you’re working for a company in Slovakia they need to notify the local labour office by:

  • submitting information card 9a and information card 9b when you finish working for them
  • providing proof of your accommodation in Slovakia

They need to do this in person or by post within 7 days.

You may need to notify the Labour Office if you’re travelling under an exemption. Check the requirements with Slovakia’s embassy or immigration authorities .

Register with the tax office

Companies that don’t have a registered branch in Slovakia but want to provide services there under a commercial contract should check if they need to register for VAT in Slovakia .

They have to do this before their employees can start working.

Show proof of exemption

You need to be able to show proof that you’re exempt to the authorities on request. This could be:

  • an employment confirmation
  • a contract such as a commercial contract
  • proof of required qualifications, such as a diploma and professional certificates

Further checks

If you’re not sure if you need a visa or permit to travel you can get advice from Slovakia’s embassy or immigration authorities .

Applying for visa or permit

This guide outlines the steps required for each visa or permit to help you prepare, but you’ll need to check the exact rules and processes with Slovakia’s immigration authorities or embassy .

Taking your family

If you have a family they can join you as dependants with all of the permits listed in this guide.

Temporary residence permits

You need to apply for a temporary residence permit if your work isn’t exempt and you’re:

  • transferring from a UK-based company to a branch in Slovakia
  • working for a company in Slovakia on a Slovakian contract
  • carrying out self-employed work
  • carrying out a ‘special activity’ such as lecturing, working for the Slovakian government, or in the arts, sports, healthcare or journalism
  • conducting research work

Temporary residence permits are valid for up to 4 years depending on which one you need.

Transferring from a UK-based company to a branch in Slovakia

You need an EU intra-company transfer ( EU ICT ) temporary residence permit if you’re transferring to a branch in Slovakia to work for:

  • up to 3 years
  • 1 year if you’re a trainee

To qualify you must:

  • be a manager, specialist or trainee
  • have worked for the UK company for at least 6 months, or 3 months if you’re a trainee
  • meet minimum income requirements
  • keep your UK employment contract
  • stay on UK payroll

The branch in Slovakia must:

  • not have been fined by the Labour Inspectorate in the past 5 years for violating working conditions
  • show that they’re meeting the required tax, health insurance, social security and pension contribution obligations
  • not have had any justified negative claims made against them by their employees

The EU ICT permit takes 3 to 4 months to get. You can’t extend it beyond 3 years or 1 year if you’re a trainee.

How it works

You need to check with Slovakia’s authorities on the exact process. This is a rough guide to help you prepare.

You submit an ICT temporary residence permit application and attend an interview at the Slovakian embassy or consulate.

You register with the local police in person or by post within 3 days of arriving.

You submit your biometrics to the ‘ Foreign Police ’.

You collect your temporary residence permit from the ‘ Foreign Police ’.

You sign up for health insurance within 3 days of getting your temporary residence permit card.

You complete a medical exam and provide a medical report to the ‘Foreign Police’ within 30 days of getting your temporary residence permit card.

Application documents

Slovakia’s authorities may request different documents at different stages of the process. Usually, they need:

  • completed application form
  • UK passports for you and any dependants, valid for at least 3 months after your intended departure date
  • 2 recent colour passport photos
  • UK employment contract
  • confirmation from your UK employer that they’re transferring you under the intra-company transfer rules
  • confirmation your UK employer is taking financial responsibility for you
  • organisational chart showing the relationship between the UK and Slovak companies
  • degree certificate ( ‘legalised’ with an apostille )
  • police clearance certificate ( ‘legalised’ with an apostille )
  • birth certificates for any children, if applying with family ( ‘legalised’ with an apostille )
  • marriage certificate, if applicable ( ‘legalised’ with an apostille )
  • proof of health insurance cover
  • proof you have enough money to support any dependants
  • confirmation of accommodation in Slovakia for a minimum of 6 months, such as a notarised lease contract or hotel confirmation

Working for a company in Slovakia on a Slovakian contract

You can apply for one of these temporary residence permits if you’ve been offered a job with a company in Slovakia:

  • EU Blue Card for at least 1 year
  • single permit for up to 2 years

EU Blue Card

To qualify for an EU Blue Card you must:

  • have an employment contract or offer for a highly skilled position with a company in Slovakia for at least 1 year
  • be placed on Slovak payroll
  • earn at least 1.5 times the average monthly wage for your position in Slovakia
  • have a university degree officially recognised by the Slovak Ministry of Education (for regulated professions) or a relevant Slovak university (for unregulated professions)

The EU Blue Card takes 2 to 3 months to get. The degree recognition process can take 2 to 3 months, so you should apply well in advance.

It’s valid for up to 4 years and you can extend it. This type of permit can lead to permanent residence if you meet the criteria.

Your employer reports the job vacancy to the labour office (labour market test), unless you have a labour shortage job .

You submit an EU Blue Card temporary residence permit application and attend an interview at the Slovakian embassy or consulate.

You collect your temporary residence permit from the ‘Foreign Police’.

  • employment offer from the company in Slovakia
  • vacant position notification from the labour market test
  • degree certificate and a recognition of education document (in the case of regulated professions the decision is issued by the Slovak Ministry of Education, and in the case of unregulated professions the decision is issued by a university which provides a course in the same or related field of study)

Single permit

To qualify for a single (temporary residence) permit you must:

  • have an employment contract or offer from a Slovak company
  • earn at least the monthly minimum wage in Slovakia (€700 as of 2023)

A single permit takes 4 to 5 months to get. It’s valid for up to 2 years and you can extend it. This type of permit can lead to permanent residence if you meet the criteria.

You submit a temporary residence permit application and attend an interview at the Slovakian embassy or consulate

Self-employed work

You need a temporary residence permit for business to work in Slovakia as a sole trader or executive of a commercial company.

To qualify you need to show one of the following:

  • that your project is innovative
  • documentation showing that you’re allowed to carry out business in Slovakia – not needed if you’re listed in the Slovakian trade register or similar register

The business permit takes up to 4 months to get. It’s valid for up to 3 years and you can extend it.

  • business plan or documentation authorising you to work as a sole trader in Slovakia, such as a trade register listing
  • proof of enough money to support your business which must be 20 times the minimum subsistence amount

Carrying out a ‘special activity’

You can get a temporary work permit for special activity if you’re in Slovakia for more than 90 days and you’re:

  • a sports professional
  • working for the Slovakian government, or an EU program, or assisting with Slovak commitments to international agreements
  • a healthcare professional
  • a volunteer
  • a journalist

The ‘special activity’ temporary residence permit takes 3 to 4 months to get. It’s valid for up to 2 years, or 5 years if you’re a sports professional. You can extend it.

You register with the local police in person or by post within 3 days of arriving

  • documentation of the professional activity you’re carrying out in Slovakia, such as employer confirmation, a contract, or confirmation from a professional organisation
  • commitment from the employing organisation that they’ll be financially responsible for your return travel if you’re told to leave the country

Research work

To qualify for a temporary residence permit for research and development you must:

  • have a hosting agreement with a recognised research institution in Slovakia
  • be paid at least the minimum subsistence amount

You collect your temporary residence card from the ‘Foreign Police’.

  • hosting agreement with the Slovak research organisation

The research temporary residence permit takes 2 to 3 months to get. It’s valid for up to 2 years and you can extend it.

Slovakian government guidance

Read official Slovakian government information on visas, work permits, and residence permits .

Check for travel changes

European governments may update or change their rules without notice.

You should always check foreign travel advice for Slovakia on issues, such as safety and security, entry requirements and travel warnings) before travelling, or planning to travel.

Content reviewed. No changes made. (The information provided is up-to-date as of 11 September 2023.)

Updated link to  information card 9a for notifying the local labour office that you are starting work for a company in Slovakia. Updated link to Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and Family of Slovak Republic setting out minimum income requirement if you are transferring from a UK-based company to a branch in Slovakia. (The information provided is up-to-date as of 21 July 2023).

Content reviewed. No changes made. (The information provided is up-to-date as of 22 March 2023).

EU ICT: Your employer no longer needs to report the vacancy to the labour office. Single permit: We've updated the monthly minimum wage required (€700 as of 2023). (The information provided is up-to-date as of 9 January 2023).

Updated to clarify that you need to provide a medical report to the ‘Foreign Police’ within 30 days of getting your temporary residence permit card. The information provided is up-to-date as of 23 September 2022.

Content reviewed. No changes made. The information provided is up-to-date as of 30 November 2021.

First published.

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Slovakia Work Visa 01

  • By Travis Kliever
  • Updated October 23, 2023

Travis Kliever

Travis Kliever

How to get a slovakia work visa & work permit: requirements & procedure.

In this article

Key Takeaways

  • Slovakia, an economic powerhouse in central Europe, offers a variety of different work visas to non-EU/common market applicants.
  • The key work visas in Slovakia are the Single Permit, the Work Permit, the EU Blue Card and a special visa category for “highly qualified” applicants.
  • With varied and complex work visa categories, many international companies benefit from the support of a global mobility/PEO company to help speed up the visa approval process. 

Building on its historical background in heavy industry, Slovakia’s economy specializes in automotive engineering, electronics, and a range of tech products. 

Since its origin in 1993 (after splitting with the  Czech Republic ), Slovakia has followed a consistent growth trajectory, sometimes referred to as the ‘Tatra Tiger’ (referencing Slovakia’s most famous mountain range). This is confirmed by the  prediction for consistent growth in 2023 . 

It is no surprise, then, that many Slovakia-based companies seek to hire skilled foreigners through the work visa process. 

Here we set out the key requirements and application procedure for Slovakia work visas. 

What are the different types of Slovakia work visa?

There are several types of work visas available in Slovakia, each with their own requirements. Like all other EU nations, Slovakia applies a different approach to work visas for EU/common market citizens compared to ‘ third country nationals ‘. The key work visas are the:

  • Single Permit , a temporary residence visa issued where the applicant and sponsoring employer can confirm the possibility of filling a vacancy. The sponsoring employer must provide details of the job vacancy to the Slovakia employment authorities 20 days before application. These can last for anywhere  from 6 months to six years  and are renewable. 
  • Work Permit , which is a longer-term visa available in some special cases, such as for spouses on family unification visas. 
  • “Highly Qualified Individuals” permit , which is available to third-country nationals in  certain exceptional cases  where there is no relevant vacancy.
  • Intra-Company Transfer Visa , for employees of a multinational company who are being  transferred to Slovakia for work .
  • EU Blue Card , for highly skilled workers from outside the EU who have a job offer with a minimum salary of €1,543/month. It allows the holder to live and work in Slovakia for a maximum of 4 years, with the possibility of renewal.

Slovakia Work Visa - Job Vacancies

How do I apply for a Slovakia work visa?

Generally, a Slovakia work visa requires the  following steps:

  • Select the appropriate visa , bearing in mind that EU/common market citizens do not require a visa. The most common options will be the EU Blue Card or the Single Permit
  • Prepare vacancy/advertise the relevant job , an obligation for employers where this is a requirement for the visa. 
  • Prepare documentation , including applying for criminal records information, health checks, passports and apostilled evidence of qualifications (especially for applicants in the “highly qualified” category).
  • Pay the visa fee,and submit the application . This can usually be done from overseas via a Slovakia embassy or consulate. 

Slovakia work visas — speed up the process

Slovakia has a relatively efficient work visa processing system, and a variety of different visas to support different applicants. Nevertheless, language issues and working out the requirements for each visa can delay the process. For this reason, many foreign applicants/companies benefit from the support of international PEO companies which offer visa support services. For more information, see our guide to the  top global PEOs in 2023 . 

Officially, it can take from 3-6 months. In our experience, the visa is often processed in as little as a month, especially where you have support from an agency. 

Yes, in order to apply for a work visa in Slovakia, applicants need to have a job offer from a Slovak employer, who can advertise the relevant job, liaise with the authorities, and sponsor the visa application. Usually, the employer will need to demonstrate that the position cannot be filled by a Slovak or EU/common market citizen. The employer will also need to pay a fee for the sponsorship. 

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Work and Travel in Slovakia

Help us grow. share what you know about getting work in slovakia for travellers., volunteer and paid work opportunities in slovakia for travellers.

Slovakia – not to be confused with Slovenia – is tucked into Central Europe. Over the years, Slovakia has become something of a backpacking hotspot. The capital of Bratislava offers a renowned party scene. But few people who travel in Slovakia go any further than this. Extend your stay and discover the real face of this country by looking at the volunteering opportunities in Slovakia. All you have to do is read our travel guide to Slovakia to find out more about what this country has to offer. 1. Track Lynx in Slovakia The lynx is an endangered species in Europe. They’re under conservation orders in a number of countries, and in Slovakia it’s no different. If you want to work in Slovakia, you could find yourself in the Tantra Mountains. Here you’ll be working with conservationists to track lynx and analyse them. You’ll also have the chance to enter the deep wilderness. This is the sort of trip that an ordinary tourist will never experience. Plus, you’ll get to learn new skills and explore parts of Slovakia that even the locals never visit. 2. Work on a Farm in Slovakia It’s true that work and travel in Slovakia isn’t common. But one of the most common requests for volunteers come from small and medium-sized farms. During the harvest seasons, there’s always a demand from farmers for helpers to support them. The work could include shadowing a farmer as they manage their crops, taking care of animals, and performing running repairs. It all depends on the type of farm you choose when you work in Slovakia. In exchange, you’ll get to connect with the local culture and see what it’s like to live in a real Slovakian home. 3. Work in a Hostel in Slovakia As mentioned before, Slovakia is a popular hotspot on the backpacking trail. During the main tourist season, you’ll find that many hostels need additional help to manage the influx of people. Working in a hostel will give you the chance to live and work in a major city like Bratislava. The work is relatively easy. It tends to involve cleaning, making the beds, or working on reception. You’ll get to connect with a mixture of locals and fellow travellers, as well as learning vital skills that can serve you well in the future.

VOLUNTEER WORK VISA / PERMIT REQUIREMENTS FOR SLOVAKIA

Slovakia is in the heart of Europe and is a part of both the Schengen Zone and the European Union (EU). You’ll need to make sure that you conform to the necessary visa requirements to travel in Slovakia first. Fellow European Union (EU) citizens are part of the free movement zone and can stay and work in Slovakia for as long as they want without a visa . North Americans, Australians, Kiwis, the Japanese, and South Koreans are able to get a Schengen Visa on arrival . This entitles them to 90 days in the whole zone. They must then leave for a further 90 days before they’re able to re-enter. The Chinese, Russians, and South Africans must apply for a Schengen Visa prior to leaving. If accepted, they can stay in the EU under the same 90-day conditions as the above.

SEASONAL BACKPACKER SKILLS NEEDED IN SLOVAKIA

Spring work.

The spring season is an ideal time to work and travel in Slovakia. It’s perfect for working on a farm because this is the main growing season and farmers need all the help they can get to make sure everything is ready after the cold winter. The work is hard, but for a few months you’ll see the farm come to life and engage in a cultural exchange at the same time. Another option involves joining conservation projects in the rural areas of Slovakia. Many of them are suspended during the winter and reopen in full in spring. Sign up and track lynx and offer endangered animals across the fields and mountains of Slovakia.

SUMMER JOBS

The summer season is the main tourist season in the country. If you intend on working in a hostel, this is the time to do it. There are plenty of volunteering opportunities in Slovakia. Most of these focus on the capital of Bratislava, but you can find other options farther afield. If you want to work with children, you’ll also find options. English immersion camps are common throughout the summer. English fluency is relatively high in Slovakia and parents are eager to expose their children to native English speakers. Other camps are also available. For example, you may decide to join a summer camp specialising in football.

The autumn offers many of the same volunteering opportunities in Slovakia as the spring. Refer back to the ‘Spring’ section for more information on the top choices for work and travel in autumn.

Skiing is a popular sport during the Slovakian winter. In the absence of other opportunities, these volunteering projects will take you into the mountains of this landlocked country. It’s not uncommon to find foreigners working in chalets or operating as ski instructors in resorts like Jasna and Donovaly. However, make sure you apply well in advance as resorts prefer to have their teams in place well in advance.

ATTITUDE TO FOREIGNERS WORKING OR VOLUNTEERING IN SLOVAKIA

Slovakia is in the heart of Europe and is known for its warm, friendly people. This is a peaceful land that has been welcoming visitors from surrounding countries for decades. It’s not a closed country. Cosmopolitan Bratislava is by far the easiest place for volunteers to work in. It’s true that most foreigners don’t visit the other parts of Slovakia. But this doesn’t make it difficult to work and travel in Slovakia as a whole. You’ll find that in the small towns and villages that people aren’t used to foreigners so they’re far more eager to get to know you. Slovakia, like most of Central Europe, is a great option if you’ve never volunteered before and want to get used to working in a foreign country. Do you want to work and travel in Slovakia?

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Visa to Slovakia for ALL Countries (Work, Student, and more)

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This article covers the fundamentals of visa policies in Slovakia. Detailing the requirements and types of visas needed to enter, study and work in Slovakia.

People from the Schengen area countries do not need a visa to enter. Some people, however, need to have a visa. If you want to apply for a Slovak visa, you need to fill up an application and visit Slovak Representative Office. You will file the paperwork there, and undergo an interview.

Read more to learn all the necessary things when applying for a visa for our little big country.

Do I Need a Visa to Go to Slovakia

If you want to buy Slovak gifts or useful Slovak products, you can find them by clicking  here  (Amazon link).

Do I Need a Visa to Go to Slovakia

To understand the visa requirements for the European Union, you must first understand the border laws, namely Schengen.

The Schengen Area is an area comprising 26 European countries that have officially abolished all passports and all other types of border control at their mutual borders. The area mostly functions as a single jurisdiction for international travel purposes, with a common visa policy.

The visa policy of the Schengen Area is set by the European Union and applies to the Schengen Area and to other EU member states except for Ireland.

The visa policy allows nationals of certain countries to enter the Schengen Area via air, land, or sea without a visa for stays of up to 90 days within a 180-day period. Nationals of certain other countries are required to have a visa either upon arrival or in transit.

As Slovakia is part of the Schengen area, you only need a visa, if your country is listed in the visa policy which you can find here .

A Schengen visa is a short-stay visa that allows a person to travel to any members of the Schengen Area , per stays up to 90 days for tourism or business purposes.

The Schengen visa is the most common visa for Europe. It enables its holder to enter, freely travel within, and leave the Schengen zone from any of the Schengen member countries. There are no border controls within the Schengen Zone.

However, if you are planning to study, work, or live in one of the Schengen countries for more than 90 days, then you must apply for a national visa of that European country and not a Schengen Visa.

Work Visa for Slovakia

You do not need a work visa to work in Slovakia. You do however need a special kind of visa, the National Visa (Visa D) to enter Slovakia if you are from a country not listed in the common visa policy of the Schengen area listed above. 

This is because to work in Slovakia, you need to apply for Temporary Residence in Slovakia to be eligible for work here. This is done at the representative office. 

Student Visa for Slovakia

The process with Student Visa is the same as with a work visa. The visa you need is called the National Visa, which you need to apply for Temporary Residence as part of your studies here. 

TIP: Working in Slovakia as a foreigner has its pros and cons, as it does in any other country in the world. Check out the complete guide about getting work in Slovakia in the article below: Complete Guide: Getting Work in Slovakia As a Foreigner

How to Get a Visa to Slovakia

How to Get a Visa to Slovakia

To get a National Visa in Slovakia, you will first need to fill out an application form which can be found on official government sites here. Then you will be required to have the base documents.

Which is your passport with a photo as well as a document about the reason for your stay and the need for a visa. This can be a document from your employer or school. 

For all this, you have to then physically be present for an interview at the Representative Office in Slovakia. After which you will either have your application approved or declined. 

Is It Easy to Get a Slovak Visa

As the requirements for a National Visa are not very hard, it overall is quite easy to obtain a visa in Slovakia. Although this depends on a few factors, like your country or occupation and the reasoning behind getting the visa. 

Visa Requirements for Slovakia

Together with the application for National Visa you also need to have these things:

  • Application for a National Visa  
  • Valid travel document (validity of your passport must be at minimum up to 90 days after leaving Slovakia)
  • Colored photo (3 x 3,5 cm) capturing your current appearance
  • Document confirming your purpose of stay (for example – a document from the police department about granting temporary or permanent residence) 
  • Document about health insurance for at least the validity period of your National Visa

If you’re applying for a National Visa to get a residence permit at the Alien Police department in Slovakia, you also need these supporting documents:

  • Complete application for residence , which must be filed directly in Slovakia
  • Proof of accommodation provision in Slovakia for at least the period of your National Visa
  • Proof of financial provision for residence in Slovakia for at least the period of your National Visa (for example – affirmation bank statement from a Slovak or International bank with at least 56€/day during your stay in Slovakia)
  • Proof of travel into Slovakia

Administrative Fees for Granting a Slovak Visa

Administrative fees for individual types of Slovak visas:

Additional fees can be applied in these cases:

Issuance of a Slovak Republic visa at the border crossing: €60

Extension of a short-term visa in the Slovak Republic: €30 (The mentioned fee is paid only in the case of a request for a personal reason.)

Request for verification of an invitation for a foreigner to travel to the Slovak Republic: €33 for each foreigner named in the request for verification of the invitation

Slovak Visa Success Rate

As Slovakia is quite filled with international students and many workers, it is safe to say that the success rate for obtaining a Slovak National Visa is high. It is nothing to be scared about, and definitely easy to obtain. 

TIP: Regardless of its small size, Slovakia has a number of international airports. Find out the complete list of regional and international Slovak airports in the article below: Airports in Slovakia: International, How Many & More Facts

Visa to Slovakia from Different Countries

Visa to Slovakia from Different Countries

Since the Slovak republic is part of the Schengen area, it also shares its border policies and visa policies. This means that to enter Slovakia, you might be required to have a visa.

However, there are not that many countries whose citizens need a visa to enter. Most of the countries that are required to have a visa on arrival are located in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. 

Here is the complete list of countries whose citizens need a visa to enter Slovakia:

Africa: Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote D’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Asia: Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Maldives, Mongolia, Nepal, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tajikistan, Thailand, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Vietnam.

Central America: Belize, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica.

South America: Bolivia, Ecuador, Guyana, Suriname.

Pacific Area: Fiji, Nauru, Vanuatu.

Europe: Belarus, Russia.

TIP: Check out my list of recommended Slovak products. They are perfect as gifts, or you will use them during your visit to Slovakia (Amazon links)

  • Slovakia Flag
  • The book about Slovak History
  • Slovak Travel Guide
  • Slovakia Adventure Map (by National Geographic)
  • T-shirt with Slovakia Flag
  • Slovakia Shot Glass
  • Legendary Horalky Biscuit (Original)

Visa to Slovakia from the UK

Since the United Kingdom used to be a part of the European Union, it is exempt from visa requirements for the Schengen area. This is still in effect even after Brexit, when the UK held a referendum and left the Union.

The only thing you need to enter Slovakia is your passport.

Visa to Slovakia from Canada

Canada is exempt from the need to have a visa to visit Slovakia and other Schengen area countries. If you plan to come to Slovakia from Canada to work, however, you will need a National Visa as part of acquiring temporary residence to be able to work here.

Visa to Slovakia from Australia

Australia is also one of the countries on the list of Schengen area visa policies. This means that to visit Slovakia, you do not need a visa. You only need your passport.

However, if you plan to work in Slovakia, you will need to apply for a National Visa as well as a temporary residence permit.

Visa to Slovakia from the USA

If you are traveling from the United States of America to Slovakia, you do not need a visa. The United States is on the list of visa-exempt countries. This means that the citizens of these countries do not need a visa to enter the Schengen area of which Slovakia is a part. 

You do still need your passport though.

Visa to Slovakia from Dubai

As Dubai is part of the United Arab Emirates, its citizens are exempt from needing a visa to enter Slovakia. If you want to come here for work though, you will need to apply for a National Visa and Temporary residence permit. You also need to have your passport to cross the border.

Visa to Slovakia from India

India is not on the list of visa-exempt countries. This means that if you are planning to visit Slovakia and you are from India, you do need a visa. The type of visa you need is a Schengen visa.

A Schengen visa is a short-stay visa that allows a person to travel to any members of the Schengen Area, per stays up to 90 days for tourism or business purposes.

Visa to Slovakia from Lebanon

When it comes to Lebanon, is on the list of countries that require a visa to enter Slovakia, and the Schengen area as a whole. If you are from Lebanon, you need to apply for a Schengen visa in order to visit any country in the Schengen area, including Slovakia.

Visa to Slovakia from the Philippines

The Philippines is on the list of countries that require a visa to enter the Schengen area. If you are from the Philippines and you wish to travel to Slovakia, you will need to apply for a Schengen visa.

If you want to work in Slovakia, you need to apply for a National Visa and a temporary residence permit.

Visa to Slovakia from Egypt

If you are from Egypt, and you are planning to travel to Slovakia, you will need a Schengen visa since Egypt is on the list of countries that are not exempt from needing a visa to enter the Schengen area of which Slovakia is a part.

In case you are coming to Slovakia for work, you will need to apply for a National Visa and a temporary residence permit.

TIP: Due to its placement in Central Europe, our little big country is surrounded by quite a few EU member states. Find out more about Slovak border states in the article below: How Many & What Countries Border with Slovakia (Full List)

Slovakia is part of the Schengen area. Which means it has the same visa policies as the rest of the countries in the area. Schengen refers to the EU passport-free zone that covers most of the European countries. It’s the largest free travel area in the world.

In the case of working in Slovakia, you need to apply for a National Visa. This process is pretty straightforward. You need to file the application directly in Slovakia, in the Representative Office.

Getting a National Visa is also a part of the process to get a temporary residence permit, both of these allow you to be in Slovakia, and find and do work here. 

The success rate of getting a Slovak National Visa is pretty high, the requirements are not that hard, and most people obtain it without a problem.

Overall, traveling or working in our little big country is fairly simple and easy. And even for those who need to apply for a visa, it is not a hard thing to get. 

TIP: Find out how good people in Slovakia speaks English, and how is the ability to speak English connected with various factors such as age, location, and life situation. Do Slovaks speak English? Read This Before Your Arrival

The Slovakian guy who loves his little big home country.

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Slovakia: Work, Residence And Business Travel In Slovakia For UK Nationals From 1 January 2021: What Has Changed?

View Dušan  Nitschneider (Nitschneider & Partners) Biography on their website

The rules for UK nationals living and working in Slovakia and for UK business travellers to Slovakia are changing on 1 January 2021. This article explains.

1. GUIDANCE

1.1 Has any guidance been issued on how UK nationals can obtain settled residence status and permission to work from 1 January 2021 and what proof of residence is needed for current residents to maintain their status?

Yes. The Slovak Parliament has adopted an Act amending certain acts in the event of withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union without a deal. This Act deals with legal status of UK nationals concerning their residence, performance of regulated professions, social security and other matters.

2. BUSINESS TRAVEL

2.1  Do UK employees need a business visa from 1 January 2021?

No. Regulation (EU) 2019/592 of 10 April 2019 exempts UK citizens from the requirement for a Schengen visa. It applies from the day the UK is no longer subject to EU law. UK citizens can enter and stay in the Schengen area for a maximum of 90 days in any rolling 180-day period.

The Schengen exemption applies from 1 January 2021 based on the Withdrawal Agreement ('WA').

However, even if allowed to enter and stay visa-free they might nonetheless need a work permit and temporary residence for the purpose of employment. For short-term business negotiation meetings the 90-day requirement stated above (i.e. business trip, etc.), work permit is not required.

Third-country nationals coming to stay and work in Slovakia for more than 90 days must obtain a Single Permit or a work permit and a residence permit for employment purposes, which involves a complicated application process.

2.2 What documents are needed on arrival for business travel from 1 January 2021?

" Travel documents (valid passport) with a validity of no more than ten years that is valid for at least three months after the intended date of leaving Slovakia. " Valid visa, if required. " Proof of duration and purpose of stay as border control may ask additional questions concerning duration and purpose of stay. " Proof that a third-country national has sufficient means of subsistence, both for the duration of the intended stay and for return to their country of origin.

2.3 Do UK nationals need additional permission to work for business travel from 1 January 2021 in the event of no deal?

No, following the withdrawal of the UK from the EU, the reciprocal visa-free regime is expected to be maintained for short stays (up to three months) and travel for tourism.

3. EMPLOYMENT AND RESIDENCE

3.1 Do UK nationals need permission to work and stay in Slovakia from 1 January 2021?

No, provided UK nationals meet the conditions for EU member state nationals to reside in Slovakia for a period longer than three months (e.g. study, employment, business) from the date of withdrawal of UK from EU.

Other UK nationals, not meeting the above conditions as of the date of the UK's withdrawal from the EU will need a work permit and a residence permit under the same conditions as other third-country nationals.

3.2 If permission to work is needed do any quotas apply for employing third-country nationals?

No. There is no general quota, however, there is one limitation for jobs where there is a lack of workers, where a new accelerated process in applying for permits applies (effective from 1 January 2019). In this case, employment of a third-country national is allowed only if less than 30% of the specific employer's workforce is third-country nationals).

3.3 If permission to work is needed from 1 January 2021, what categories of permission are commonly granted?

According to statistics from the Central Office of Labour, Social Affairs and Family, the most common categories are: " operators of machinery and equipment; " qualified workers and craftsmen; " highly skilled employees and specialists.

3.4 If permission to work or stay is needed from 1 January 2021, how long does the procedure take?

Qualified or seasonal work The employer must announce a job vacancy to the Slovak Labour Office 15 days prior to submission of an application for a temporary residence permit by the third-country national. Unqualified work The employer must announce a job vacancy to the Slovak Labour Office 20 days prior to submission of an application for a temporary residence permit by the third-country national. The relevant police department decides on the application within 90 days from its submission (or within 30 days in specific cases). The procedure may take between one and six months, as the procedure is complicated and usually the statutory period is extended because all the requested documentation has not been provided, or because it is incomplete and requires completion.

3.5 If permission to work and stay is needed from 1 January 2021, what Government fees are payable?

Temporary residence for the purpose of employment: EUR 165.50 / EUR 170 Temporary residence for the purpose of seasonal employment: EUR 33 / EUR 35 Request for a European Union Blue Card: EUR 165.50 / EUR 170

4. What formalities apply to UK frontier workers working in Slovakia but living in another country from 1 January 2021?

There are currently specific obligations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Where a worker has permanent or temporary residence in the border areas of a neighbouring state within 30km of an open border crossing into Slovakia, these employees must be in possession of confirmation of the existence of an employment relationship or place of work in Slovakia at a maximum distance of 30km by road. In this case the employee is not required to undergo home quarantine for COVID–19.

5. From what date are third-country nationals entitled to apply for permanent residence?

Five years of legal stay in Slovakia (subject to conditions). Five years of legal and continuous stay in the territory of an EU Member State as a Blue Card holder; however, under condition of a legal and continuous two-year stay in Slovakia prior to applying for a permanent residence permit (subject to conditions).

6. What steps could UK nationals take currently to secure their residence and work status?

UK nationals and their family members (e.g. spouses, descendants and older relatives), who have resided in Slovakia for five years (or less, subject to certain conditions) prior to Brexit date, will be considered long-term residents, meaning they may stay and work in Slovakia without any time limitation. Those who do not meet the above conditions but have been resident in Slovakia longer than three months prior to Brexit date (e.g. for study, employment or business purposes), will be able to stay in Slovakia for a limited time period. Their stay will be considered long-term residence limited for five years. Following the expiry of this period, they will be able to apply for permanent residence for an unlimited time. All UK nationals must obtain a new residence card for third-country (non-EU) nationals or exchange a standard EU residence card for a non-EU card (Povolenie na pobyt) before 30 June 2021.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

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travel to slovakia to work

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Ancient ruins on a grassy hill in Slovakia

Work and travel in Slovakia

Choose another destination

People walk down a busy city street in Slovakia

How to apply

Who can apply.

To work in Slovakia through the Youth Mobility program, you must:

  • be a Canadian citizen
  • be 18-35 years old (inclusive),
  • live in Canada when applying, and
  • have a valid Canadian passport

Other requirements may apply, check  Slovakia’s website  for more details.

What type of work visa do I need?

You need to apply for a Slovak National visa and specify that you are applying for a “Youth Mobility Stay”. There are five different categories that you can apply for:

Career development – graduates

Post-secondary graduates who want additional training in Slovakia under a pre-arranged contract of employment (job offer) in support of their career development.

  • Internships

Registered students at a post-secondary institution in Canada who want to complete part of their academic curriculum through a pre-arranged internship or pre-arranged work placement in Slovakia as part of an agreement between post-secondary institutions.

  • Career development - Others

Young Canadians who want additional training in Slovakia under a pre-arranged contract of employment (job offer) in support of their career development.

  • Academic vacation

Registered students at a post-secondary institution in Canada who want to travel and work in Slovakia during their academic.

  • Working Holiday

Young Canadians who want to travel to Slovakia and work temporarily to help finance their trip.

Do I need a formal job or internship offer?

Yes, you need a job offer (pre-arranged contract of employment) or a formal internship offer if you apply for:

  • Career development - Graduates

No, you don’t need one if you apply for:

How long can I stay and work?

You can stay and work in Slovakia for up to 12 months.

You can participate in Slovakia’s Youth Mobility Stay program twice. Your second participation must be in a  different category  and there must be a break of at least three months between the two participations.

Gondolas alongside a snow-covered mountain in Slovakia

Start your Adventure

About slovakia.

Slovakia is a central European country with vast forest areas covering forty percent of its territory. Slovakia is a landlocked country bordered by the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, Hungary, and Austria, with ports on the Danube River at Bratislava and Komarno.

Slovaks share a common culture despite regional and even local differences in dialect, local customs and religion. The culture of Slovakia is the result of various folk traditions and because of its position in Central Europe it is influenced by Austrian, German, Polish and Hungarian cultures.

Slovakia’s economy continued its stellar growth at the outset of 2017 and remains one of the fastest-growing countries in the Eurozone. The country prides itself on its industrial heritage which has provided a stable base for the development of certain sectors such as automotive and electronics.

Explore the country’s breathtaking rocky mountain ranges, canyons and gorges, mysterious mountain valleys, winding trails and beautiful waterfalls. Rare flora and fauna and many other irresistible natural landscapes are found all over Slovakia. Make sure to visit Slovakia’s spas which are among the oldest and finest in Central Europe.

The best way to make sure your trip is the experience of a lifetime is to plan. Review our travel checklist to find out what you should know or do before travelling to and working in a foreign country.

Before you leave, remember to register as a Canadian abroad to receive notifications in case of an emergency while you are abroad or of a personal emergency at home. The service also enables you to receive important information before or during a natural disaster or civil unrest.

Need help planning? One of IEC’s recognized organizations might be able to help you find a job, transportation, and provide travel advice.

Most recognized organizations charge a fee for their services.

Tourism Slovakia

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Ex­pe­ri­ence an Unfor­get­tab­le Summer in the USA!

Summer is coming and you still don’t know how to spend it?  Come experience life across the ocean in the United States and invite your friends. The best summer of your life is just a few steps away. Check out what awaits you!

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED (ALL COSTS EXCEPT FOR VISAS)

Hands up for an amazing summer

Are you interested in a scholarship? Fill in our form and become one of our Summer Work & Travel Ambassadors.

IMPORTANT – THE NEW DEADLINE IS DECEMBER 31!

Summer Work and Travel program

This program offers a unique opportunity to all full-time university students who want to improve their English and experience incredible moments in the U.S.

Conditions of participation:

  • Full-time college student or recent graduate
  • At least a basic level of English
  • Return to Slovakia by October 15

A summer of your dreams!

Get your dream job and earn money to travel around America. Choose the field in which you want to work and leave everything else to the agency.

Work by the water

Work in an amusement park, work in a restaurant or hospitality services, work in a summer camp, are you interested in the program.

Summer Work and Travel California sunset Slovak students leto v amerike

Planning your big trip to California?

travel to slovakia to work

Alaska and Hawaii – two tempting extremes

travel to slovakia to work

The East Coast – a place full of surprises

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Alone or with friends – you will not be bored in New York

travel to slovakia to work

Along the Mississippi River (Nashville, Alabama, Louisiana) – another face of America

travel to slovakia to work

How to pack for the whole summer? Don’t forget to take these eight things with you

Even your #letovamerike can be unfor­get­tab­le. join the photo contest, covid-19 alert: how to travel during the pandemic, summer work and travel program through the eyes of its par­ti­ci­pants.

Marcela Belianská

Work and Travel program for students

This site is managed by the U.S. Embassy in Slovakia

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Slovakia - Highly-qualified worker

Are you a non-EU citizen wishing to work as a highly-skilled employee in Slovakia? You can find information below on the conditions to fulfil and procedures to follow, as well as the rights you can enjoy during your stay.

According to the Slovak legislation, a highly-qualified worker (other than a Blue Card) is not classified as a separate category and does not have a separate type of residence. Depending on the situation, you can either apply for a Blue Card, or a temporary residence for the purpose of employment .

A Blue Card is issued for up to four years and authorises you to enter, reside and work in Slovakia and to leave and re-enter Slovakia during the period for which it is issued.

To fulfil the conditions to be characterised as a highly-qualified worker, you must hold a university or college diploma (e.g. Bachelor, Master, PhD), your contract of employment must be concluded for at least one year and must foresee a minimum monthly salary of at least 1.5 times the average monthly wage in the Slovak national economy in the relevant branch (the data is available on the website of the Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic ). The number of non-EU citizens who can work and reside in Slovakia is not limited by a quota. However, the Central Office of Labour, Social Affairs and Family shall assess whether it is possible to fill the vacancy corresponding to highly qualified employment by a candidate registered in the Register of Unemployed Job Seekers.

To work as a "highly-qualified" worker in Slovakia, you must, in general, obtain a specific type of temporary residence for the purpose of employment, the so-called Blue Card. The Blue Card may be granted based on a confirmation on the possibility to fill the vacancy corresponding to highly qualified employment issued by the Central Office of Labour, Social Affairs and Family upon request of the Foreign Police Department. The confirmation on the possibility to fill the vacancy corresponding to highly qualified employment is issued within five working days from delivery of the request of the Foreign Police Department to the Central Office of Labour, Social Affairs and Family.

Any exemptions to the above requirements are stipulated by law.

If you are subject to visa requirements, you might also need to obtain an entry visa in order to arrive to Slovakia.

No information available at the moment.

  • More information on the EU Blue Card in Slovakia
  • Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (residence permits)
  • Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs (visas)
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  • Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and Family
  • Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Sport

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COVID-19: travel health notice for all travellers

Slovakia travel advice

Latest updates: Editorial change

Last updated: January 9, 2024 09:21 ET

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Safety and security, entry and exit requirements, laws and culture, natural disasters and climate, slovakia - take normal security precautions.

Take normal security precautions in Slovakia

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Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and purse snatching, occurs, especially in crowded areas and particularly during summer months. Foreigners are often targeted.

Pickpockets often work in teams, sometimes including children, and target people on trains and at railway stations and airports. Their methods include distracting a victim who is boarding or exiting a train or surrounding a victim in line-ups or at check-out counters.

Always be suspicious if someone offers to help you with a flat tire. These individuals may have punctured the tire themselves and seize the opportunity to steal a bag or other valuable objects while you are distracted.

Individuals have also been harassed for reasons of race or foreign-looking appearance.

  • Ensure that your personal belongings, including your passport and other travel documents, are secure at all times
  • Do not show signs of affluence
  • Avoid public parks in city centres and railway stations after dark

Be vigilant in:

  • shopping centres
  • public transportation stations
  • major tourist attractions, including Bratislava’s Old Town area

Car thefts and break-ins occur, particularly in major cities. Car thieves target foreign luxury vehicles more than other models.

Avoid leaving luggage or valuables in the vehicle; use secure parking facilities.

There is a threat of terrorism in Europe. Terrorist attacks have occurred in a number of European cities. There is a potential for other violent incidents.

Targets could include:

  • government buildings, including schools
  • places of worship
  • airports and other transportation hubs and networks
  • public areas such as tourist attractions, restaurants, bars, coffee shops, shopping centres, markets, hotels and other sites frequented by foreigners

Always be aware of your surroundings when in public places.

Individuals posing as plainclothes police officers may ask to see your foreign currency and passport. If approached, decline to hand over personal belongings. Offer instead to go to the nearest police station or seek assistance from a local contact.

Overseas fraud

Spiked food and drinks

Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances, as these items may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault and robbery.

Demonstrations

Demonstrations take place from time to time.

Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent at any time. They can also lead to disruptions to traffic and public transportation.

  • Avoid areas where demonstrations and large gatherings are taking place
  • Follow the instructions of local authorities
  • Monitor local media for information on ongoing demonstrations

Mass gatherings (large-scale events)

Road safety

Road conditions and road safety can vary greatly throughout the country. Driving conditions may be hazardous during winter.

Drivers do not respect traffic laws. They often drive at excessive speeds and use reckless manoeuvring.

Avoid travelling after dark in remote areas.

Public transportation

Public transportation is well developed and reliable.

Officially marked taxis are generally reliable, safe and economical. Beware of taxi drivers who try to overcharge by not switching on the meter. Pre-negotiate the fare.

We do not make assessments on the compliance of foreign domestic airlines with international safety standards.

Information about foreign domestic airlines

Every country or territory decides who can enter or exit through its borders. The Government of Canada cannot intervene on your behalf if you do not meet your destination’s entry or exit requirements.

We have obtained the information on this page from the Slovak authorities. It can, however, change at any time.

Verify this information with the  Foreign Representatives in Canada .

  • Schengen area

Slovakia is a Schengen area country. Canadian citizens do not need a visa for travel to countries within the Schengen area. However, visa-free travel only applies to stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any Schengen area country.

If you plan to stay in the Schengen area for a longer period of time, you will need a visa. You must contact the high commission or embassy of the country or countries you are travelling to and obtain the appropriate visa(s) prior to travel.

Useful links

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada

Entry requirements vary depending on the type of passport you use for travel.

Before you travel, check with your transportation company about passport requirements. Its rules on passport validity may be more stringent than the country’s entry rules.

Regular Canadian passport

Your passport must be valid for at least 3 months beyond the date you expect to leave the Schengen area.

Passport for official travel

Different entry rules may apply.

Official travel

Passport with “X” gender identifier

While the Government of Canada issues passports with an “X” gender identifier, it cannot guarantee your entry or transit through other countries. You might face entry restrictions in countries that do not recognize the “X” gender identifier. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

Other travel documents

Different entry rules may apply when travelling with a temporary passport or an emergency travel document. Before you leave, check with the closest foreign representative for your destination.

  • Foreign Representatives in Canada
  • Canadian passports

Tourist visa: not required for stays up to 90 days* Business visa: not required for stays up to 90 days Student visa: not required for stays up to 90 days

* The 90-day period begins upon initial entry into any country of the Schengen area. Stays are cumulative and include visits to any Schengen area country within any 180-day period.

Canadians who intend to work or plan to remain in Slovakia for more than 90 days must obtain a temporary residence permit. Failure to obtain a residence permit for stays of over 90 days could result in deportation. Deportation from Slovakia will also mean expulsion from the greater Schengen area.

Other entry requirements

Customs officials may ask you to show them a return or onward ticket and proof of sufficient funds for your stay.

Health insurance

Customs officials may ask you to show proof of health insurance.

Registration

If you intend to stay in private accommodations for a visit lasting more than 30 days, you must register with the nearest police station within three days of arrival. Hotel guests are registered by hotel staff.

Children and travel

Learn more about travelling with children .

Yellow fever

Learn about potential entry requirements related to yellow fever (vaccines section).

Relevant Travel Health Notices

  • Global Measles Notice - 31 August, 2023
  • COVID-19 and International Travel - 31 August, 2023

This section contains information on possible health risks and restrictions regularly found or ongoing in the destination. Follow this advice to lower your risk of becoming ill while travelling. Not all risks are listed below.

Consult a health care professional or visit a travel health clinic preferably 6 weeks before you travel to get personalized health advice and recommendations.

Routine vaccines

Be sure that your  routine vaccinations , as per your province or territory , are up-to-date before travelling, regardless of your destination.

Some of these vaccinations include measles-mumps-rubella (MMR), diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, varicella (chickenpox), influenza and others.

Pre-travel vaccines and medications

You may be at risk for preventable diseases while travelling in this destination. Talk to a travel health professional about which medications or vaccines may be right for you, based on your destination and itinerary. 

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.

Country Entry Requirement*

  • Proof of vaccination is not required to enter this country.

Recommendation

  • Vaccination is not recommended.

* It is important to note that country entry requirements may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular office of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.

About Yellow Fever

Yellow Fever Vaccination Centres in Canada

There is a risk of hepatitis A in this destination. It is a disease of the liver. People can get hepatitis A if they ingest contaminated food or water, eat foods prepared by an infectious person, or if they have close physical contact (such as oral-anal sex) with an infectious person, although casual contact among people does not spread the virus.

Practise  safe food and water precautions and wash your hands often. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers to areas where hepatitis A is present.

Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a risk in some areas of this destination. It is a viral disease that affects the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). It is spread to humans by the bite of infected ticks or occasionally when unpasteurized milk products are consumed.

Travellers to areas where TBE is found may be at higher risk  during April to November, and the risk is highest for people who hike or camp in forested areas.

Protect yourself from tick bites . The vaccine is not available in Canada. It may be available in the destination you are travelling to.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease. It can spread quickly from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

Anyone who is not protected against measles is at risk of being infected with it when travelling internationally.

Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are fully protected against measles.

  Hepatitis B is a risk in every destination. It is a viral liver disease that is easily transmitted from one person to another through exposure to blood and body fluids containing the hepatitis B virus.  Travellers who may be exposed to blood or other bodily fluids (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) are at higher risk of getting hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for all travellers. Prevent hepatitis B infection by practicing safe sex, only using new and sterile drug equipment, and only getting tattoos and piercings in settings that follow public health regulations and standards.

 The best way to protect yourself from seasonal influenza (flu) is to get vaccinated every year. Get the flu shot at least 2 weeks before travelling.  

 The flu occurs worldwide. 

  •  In the Northern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs from November to   April.
  •  In the Southern Hemisphere, the flu season usually runs between April and   October.
  •  In the tropics, there is flu activity year round. 

The flu vaccine available in one hemisphere may only offer partial protection against the flu in the other hemisphere.

The flu virus spreads from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Clean your hands often and wear a mask if you have a fever or respiratory symptoms.

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious viral disease. It can spread from person to person by direct contact and through droplets in the air.

It is recommended that all eligible travellers complete a COVID-19 vaccine series along with any additional recommended doses in Canada before travelling. Evidence shows that vaccines are very effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. While vaccination provides better protection against serious illness, you may still be at risk of infection from the virus that causes COVID-19. Anyone who has not completed a vaccine series is at increased risk of being infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 and is at greater risk for severe disease when travelling internationally.

Before travelling, verify your destination’s COVID-19 vaccination entry/exit requirements. Regardless of where you are going, talk to a health care professional before travelling to make sure you are adequately protected against COVID-19.

In this destination, rabies  may be present in some wildlife species, including bats. Rabies is a deadly disease that spreads to humans primarily through bites or scratches from an infected animal. 

If you are bitten or scratched by an animal while travelling, immediately wash the wound with soap and clean water and see a health care professional. 

Before travel, discuss rabies vaccination with a health care professional. It may be recommended for travellers who will be working directly with wildlife. 

Safe food and water precautions

Many illnesses can be caused by eating food or drinking beverages contaminated by bacteria, parasites, toxins, or viruses, or by swimming or bathing in contaminated water.

  • Learn more about food and water precautions to take to avoid getting sick by visiting our eat and drink safely abroad page. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!
  • Avoid getting water into your eyes, mouth or nose when swimming or participating in activities in freshwater (streams, canals, lakes), particularly after flooding or heavy rain. Water may look clean but could still be polluted or contaminated.
  • Avoid inhaling or swallowing water while bathing, showering, or swimming in pools or hot tubs. 

Insect bite prevention

Many diseases are spread by the bites of infected insects such as mosquitoes, ticks, fleas or flies. When travelling to areas where infected insects may be present:

  • Use insect repellent (bug spray) on exposed skin
  • Cover up with light-coloured, loose clothes made of tightly woven materials such as nylon or polyester
  • Minimize exposure to insects
  • Use mosquito netting when sleeping outdoors or in buildings that are not fully enclosed

To learn more about how you can reduce your risk of infection and disease caused by bites, both at home and abroad, visit our insect bite prevention page.

Find out what types of insects are present where you’re travelling, when they’re most active, and the symptoms of the diseases they spread.

Animal precautions

Some infections, such as rabies and influenza, can be shared between humans and animals. Certain types of activities may increase your chance of contact with animals, such as travelling in rural or forested areas, camping, hiking, and visiting wet markets (places where live animals are slaughtered and sold) or caves.

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, livestock (pigs, cows), monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats, and to avoid eating undercooked wild game.

Closely supervise children, as they are more likely to come in contact with animals.

Person-to-person infections

Stay home if you’re sick and practise proper cough and sneeze etiquette , which includes coughing or sneezing into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand. Reduce your risk of colds, the flu and other illnesses by:

  •   washing your hands often
  • avoiding or limiting the amount of time spent in closed spaces, crowded places, or at large-scale events (concerts, sporting events, rallies)
  • avoiding close physical contact with people who may be showing symptoms of illness 

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) , HIV , and mpox are spread through blood and bodily fluids; use condoms, practise safe sex, and limit your number of sexual partners. Check with your local public health authority pre-travel to determine your eligibility for mpox vaccine.  

Medical services and facilities

Medical facilities are adequate.

Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment.

Make sure you get travel insurance that includes coverage for medical evacuation and hospital stays.

Travel health and safety

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a   travel health kit , especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.

You must abide by local laws.

Learn about what you should do and how we can help if you are arrested or detained abroad .

Transfer to a Canadian prison

Canada and Slovakia are signatories to the Convention on the Transfer of Sentenced Persons. This enables a Canadian imprisoned in Slovakia to request a transfer to a Canadian prison to complete a sentence. The transfer requires the agreement of both Canadian and Slovakia authorities.

This process can take a long time, and there is no guarantee that the transfer will be approved by either or both sides.

Penalties for possession, use or trafficking of illegal drugs are severe. Convicted offenders can expect lengthy jail sentences.

Public intoxication and disorderly conduct is illegal. Offenders could be severely fined or detained.

Drugs, alcohol and travel

Dual citizenship

Dual citizenship is legally recognized in Slovakia.

If you are a Canadian citizen, but also a citizen of Slovakia, our ability to offer you consular services may be limited while you're there. You may also be subject to different entry/exit requirements .

Travellers with dual citizenship

International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is an international treaty. It can help parents with the return of children who have been removed to or retained in certain countries in violation of custody rights. The convention applies between Canada and Slovakia.

If your child was wrongfully taken to, or is being held in Slovakia, and if the applicable conditions are met, you may apply for the return of your child to the Slovak court.

If you are in this situation:

  • act as quickly as you can
  • contact the Central Authority for your province or territory of residence for information on starting an application under The Hague Convention
  • consult a lawyer in Canada and in Slovakia to explore all the legal options for the return of your child
  • report the situation to the nearest Canadian government office abroad or to the Vulnerable Children’s Consular Unit at Global Affairs Canada by calling the Emergency Watch and Response Centre

If your child was removed from a country other than Canada, consult a lawyer to determine if The Hague Convention applies.

Be aware that Canadian consular officials cannot interfere in private legal matters or in another country’s judicial affairs.

  • List of Canadian Central Authorities for the Hague Convention
  • International Child Abduction: A Guidebook for Left-Behind Parents
  • Travelling with children
  • The Hague Convention - Hague Conference on Private International Law
  • Canadian embassies and consulates by destination
  • Emergency Watch and Response Centre

Identification

You must carry photo identification, such as a passport as local authorities can ask you to prove your identity. Keep a photocopy of your passport in a safe place, in case it’s lost or confiscated.

Photography

Avoid taking pictures of military installations and personnel, as this activity is prohibited locally.

You should carry an international driving permit.

There is zero tolerance for driving under the influence of alcohol. Penalties are strict.

Vehicles must be equipped with the following items for emergency situations:

  • a first aid kit
  • warning triangle
  • functional spare tire
  • high-visibility vests for all passengers

A vignette (toll sticker) is required to travel on highways. You can buy them at border crossings, gas stations and post offices.

Fines for traffic violations must be paid on the spot.

  • Driving in Slovakia  - European Commission
  • More about the International Driving Permit

The currency of Slovakia is the euro (EUR).

If you are carrying €10,000 or more, or the equivalent in other currencies, you must make a declaration to customs when you enter or leave the European Union. It includes sums in:

  • banknotes and coins
  • bearer negotiable instruments such as cheques, travellers’ cheques, promissory notes and money orders
  • bonds, shares
  • gold coins with a gold content of at least 90 %
  • gold bars, nuggets or clumps with a gold content of at least 99.5 %
  • any other convertible asset

This does not apply if you are travelling within the European Union or in transit to a non-EU country.

EU cash controls - European Commission

Heavy rains and thunderstorms during spring and summer may result in flooding, generate localized landslides and cause significant damage to roads.

If you decide to travel to Slovakia during these seasons:

  • be prepared to change your travel plans on short notice, including cutting short or cancelling your trip
  • stay informed of the latest regional weather forecasts
  • carry emergency contact information for your airline or tour operator
  • follow the advice and instructions of local authorities

Local services

Dial 112 for emergency assistance.

Consular assistance

For emergency consular assistance, call the Embassy of Canada to Slovakia, in Bratislava, and follow the instructions. At any time, you may also contact the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa.

The decision to travel is your choice and you are responsible for your personal safety abroad. We take the safety and security of Canadians abroad very seriously and provide credible and timely information in our Travel Advice to enable you to make well-informed decisions regarding your travel abroad.

The content on this page is provided for information only. While we make every effort to give you correct information, it is provided on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind, expressed or implied. The Government of Canada does not assume responsibility and will not be liable for any damages in connection to the information provided.

If you need consular assistance while abroad, we will make every effort to help you. However, there may be constraints that will limit the ability of the Government of Canada to provide services.

Learn more about consular services .

Risk Levels

  take normal security precautions.

Take similar precautions to those you would take in Canada.

  Exercise a high degree of caution

There are certain safety and security concerns or the situation could change quickly. Be very cautious at all times, monitor local media and follow the instructions of local authorities.

IMPORTANT: The two levels below are official Government of Canada Travel Advisories and are issued when the safety and security of Canadians travelling or living in the country or region may be at risk.

  Avoid non-essential travel

Your safety and security could be at risk. You should think about your need to travel to this country, territory or region based on family or business requirements, knowledge of or familiarity with the region, and other factors. If you are already there, think about whether you really need to be there. If you do not need to be there, you should think about leaving.

  Avoid all travel

You should not travel to this country, territory or region. Your personal safety and security are at great risk. If you are already there, you should think about leaving if it is safe to do so.

Caution October 19, 2023

Worldwide caution, update january 10, 2024, information for u.s. citizens in the middle east.

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  • Contact Us |
  • MyTravelGov |

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Slovakia Travel Advisory

Travel advisory july 26, 2023, slovakia - level 1: exercise normal precautions.

Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed.

Exercise normal precautions in Slovakia.

Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Slovakia.

If you decide to travel to Slovakia:

  • Enroll in the  Smart Traveler Enrollment Program  ( STEP ) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on  Facebook  and  Twitter .
  • Review the  Country Security Report  for Slovakia.
  • Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the  Traveler’s Checklist .

Travel Advisory Levels

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Travel Better, Cheaper, Longer

Slovakia Travel Guide

Last Updated: September 1, 2023

An aerial view of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, featuring historic buildings and plenty of greenery

Slovakia is a Central European country known for its dramatic mountainous landscapes, medieval history, and stunning architecture. As a land-locked country, it’s been part of numerous empires and governments throughout its history, all of which have left their own unique influence on the region.

I’ve visited Slovakia several times over the years and I’m always amazed at how much is packed into such a small country (as well as how few people visit beyond the capital). While Bratislava gets plenty of attention, the country as a whole sees a fraction of the crowds compared to its neighbors.

But their loss is your gain!

Slovakia is filled with beautiful rivers, lakes, national parks, tiny towns, and castle ruins. And compared to its neighbors it’s also quite affordable. It’s the perfect place to hike, road trip, and escape Europe’s summer crowds — all while on a budget!

This travel guide to Slovakia can help you save money, plan your visit, and make the most of your trip to this underrated gem!

Table of Contents

  • Things to See and Do
  • Typical Costs
  • Suggested Budget
  • Money-Saving Tips
  • Where to Stay
  • How to Get Around
  • How to Stay Safe
  • Best Places to Book Your Trip
  • Related Blogs on Slovakia

Top 5 Things to See and Do in Slovakia

An aerial view of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, featuring historic buildings and plenty of greenery

1. Explore Bratislava

Bratislava is Slovakia’s capital and largest city. Bordering both Austria and Hungary, its position on the banks of the Danube make it an obvious point of entry for most travelers. Don’t miss the city’s Old Town and Bratislava Castle. There’s also an eclectic music scene here.

2. Visit Košice

Košice is the second-largest city in Slovakia, dating back to the 13th century. The city center encompasses the historic part of town and has the largest number of historical monuments in the country. Be sure to visit the 13th-century St. Elisabeth Cathedral.

3. See Banská Štiavnica

This well-preserved UNESCO medieval town sits in a valley formed after an ancient volcano collapsed. Be sure to visit the open-air mining museum, where you can walk more than a kilometer underground (10 EUR, an additional 15 EUR for a tour in English).

4. Hike Slovak Paradise National Park

Slovak Paradise National Park boasts over 100 kilometers (62-miles) of hiking trails, passing through canyons, meadows, and more waterfalls than you can count. The hiking isn’t difficult, but you must navigate narrow passages, climb steep ladders, and use chains above ravines.

5. Take a wine tour

Not far from Bratislava lies Modra, which is the place to go for wine tours and tastings. Look out for the annual Modra Wine Cellars Day, when many of the wine cellars in the area organize a day-long tasting for visitors. Expect to pay at least 40 EUR for a tour.

Other Things to See and Do in Slovakia

1. visit the slovak karst caves.

There are almost 2,500 caves in Slovakia — and only 400 of them have been explored. In the southern Slovak Karst region, there are plenty of options but if you want a truly unique experience, visit a section of Domica Cave where you can take an underground boat ride on the River Styx (trip to Hades not included). Admission including the boat ride is 9 EUR. Other caves worth checking out are Dobšinská Ice Cave, Harmanecka, and Gombasecka.

2. Go rock climbing

Head to the mountains around Terchová in the north or Slovenský Raj in the east for some world-class rock climbing. You’ll find beautiful gorges that you can climb for free thanks to the ropes and ladders already in place. If you’re new to rock climbing and would rather do a guided trip, expect to pay around 80 EUR per person.

3. Run the oldest marathon in Europe

The Košice Peace Marathon is the oldest marathon in Europe (and the second oldest marathon in the world). Held in Košice each year since 1924, the city is completely overtaken by the event as thousands come to take part, watch, and celebrate. The marathon happens on the first Sunday in October. If you want to run the race yourself, registration is 37 EUR. Be sure to book your accommodation far in advance as the entire city fills up.

4. Relax in a thermal cave bath

For a uniquely Slovakian experience, visit the Parenica cave bath at the Sklené Teplice spa. Located in Central Slovakia, these natural hot springs have been in use for centuries. The water is a constant 42°C (107°F) and is perfect for relaxing (especially if you’re visiting in the winter). Bath visits last 20 minutes and are included in your stay at the spa, which costs around 70 EUR per night.

5. Tour the Nedbalka Gallery

The Nedbalka Gallery in Bratislava has a spectacular award-winning design that resembles the Guggenheim Museum in New York City and is a stark contrast to the more traditional medieval buildings that make up the city’s Old Town. The gallery, which was heavily remodeled in 2012, spans five floors and is home to over 1,000 works depicting Slovak culture. Admission is 5 EUR and includes a coffee or tea at the gallery’s café.

6. Hike the smallest alpine mountain range in Europe

The most famous national park in Slovakia, High Tatras is located in the north of the country along the border with Poland . Stretching 53 kilometers (33 miles), it’s the smallest alpine mountain range in Europe. If you want to reach the peak of the High Tatras, Gerlachovsky Stit, you need to hire a mountain guide as the ascent is extremely challenging and not to be attempted alone. If you don’t want to hike (or want an easier option), Lomnicky Stit is slightly lower and far more accessible thanks to the cable car to the top. During the winter, there are several ski resorts here. Round-trip cable car tickets are expensive at 59 EUR, however, you can hike up part way and then take the cable car for half price.

7. Explore an ice cave

One of the most popular caves in the country is Dobšinská, an ice cave located near Dobšiná in Central Slovakia. Discovered in 1870, the caves are a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the first caves in Europe to be lit by electricity. The cave spans over 1,500 acres and is full of all kinds of stunning natural ice formations. Admission is 9 EUR for a 30-minute visit.

8. Visit the Old Market Hall (Stará tržnica)

Each Saturday between 9am-3pm the Old Market Hall in Bratislava hosts its weekly market where you can buy food and goods from regional farmers and producers. There’s also a children’s theater performance and book fair every Saturday. The current building dates to 1910, however, there were medieval fortifications here dating back to the 16th century. In addition to foods and produce, the market also hosts cultural events, music performances, two cafes, a brewery, and a cooking school. The Old Market Hall also hosts an annual beer festival (called Salón Piva) where you can sample the locally produced beer.

9. Go hiking

Slovakia is one of the best countries in Europe for hiking. There are hundreds of trails, including dozens of long-distance routes as well as easy, moderate, and challenging day hikes. Some hikes to check out are Rysy Mountain, near the border of Poland (20km, 10 hours); Kriván, considered Slovakia’s most beautiful mountain (6km, 4 hours); and Popradske Pleso, a picturesque alpine hike (4km, 2 hours). If you’re going hiking in the mountains, be sure to check the weather in advance as conditions can change rapidly. Always make sure you have the proper gear and plenty of water too.

10. Hit the slopes

The Tatra mountain range rivals the Alps when it comes to beauty. However, when it comes to skiing, there are fewer skiers and cheaper prices in Slovakia (lift tickets are upwards of 75% cheaper than in neighboring Austria). Some ski resorts to visit are Jasná Nízke Tatry (Liptovský Mikuláš), Relax Center Plejsy (Krompachy), Tale (Bystra), and Malinô Brdo (Ružomberok). Expect to pay around 49 EUR for a lift pass, however, you can find passes for as little as 8-16 EUR in places like Moštenica, Zliechov, and Skorušina.

Slovakia Travel Costs

An aerial view of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, featuring historic buildings and plenty of greenery

Outside of Bratislava, budget hotel rooms start around 25-40 EUR per night. In Bratislava, expect to pay closer to double that.

Airbnb is a budget-friendly option available around the country with private rooms starting at 25 EUR per night. For an entire home or apartment, expect to pay at least 50 EUR per night.

For anyone traveling with a tent, camping is available around the country. Wild camping is legal but be sure to double-check as it is illegal in certain protected areas (no camping in the High Tatras or national parks, for example). You’re also not allowed to camp in forested areas and should use caution when lighting fires as this is generally prohibited. Official campgrounds are scattered around the country with basic plots for two without electricity costing 14-16 EUR per night.

Food – Slovakian cuisine is based on three main staples: pork, cabbage, and potatoes (much like many of its neighbors). Polish and Hungarian influences abound, so expect lots of soups, sauerkraut, breaded meats, and dumplings. Lunch is the main meal of the day, with soup being the most common main course. A popular local delicacy is jaternica , a blood sausage made with pig’s blood and buckwheat. Halušky (soft ptato dumplings) and schnitzel are two other popular traditional choices.

For an inexpensive meal of traditional cuisine, expect to pay around 7-12 EUR. Fast food (think McDonald’s) costs 5-7 EUR for a combo meal. Thai and Indian food can be found in a couple of the larger cities in the country, costing 8-13 EUR for a main dish.

If you want to splash out, a three-course meal of traditional cuisine costs around 20 EUR, including a drink.

Expect to pay between 1.50-2.50 EUR for a beer and about the same for a latte or cappuccino (if you buy beer at the grocery store it’s just 1-1.50 EUR). A glass of wine generally costs around 2.50-4 EUR.

If you are planning to cook your own food, a week’s worth of groceries costs around 20-35 EUR for basic staples like pasta, rice, seasonal produce, and some meat. A medium-sized bag of pasta is less than 1 EUR, fresh buns (like croissants) are around .50 EUR while a loaf of bread is around 2 EUR. Cereal is around 1.50 EUR while a large bag of potato chips is 1.50-2 EUR.

If you’re vegan or vegetarian, Bratislava has tons of options. Beyond the large supermarkets (which have things like soy meat and alternative kinds of milk), there are a handful of vegan and vegan-friendly restaurants around the city, including Šmak (vegan sushi), Vegan Kiosk (vegan burgers and wraps), and La Donuteria (vegan and non-vegan donuts).

Other suggested places to eat in Bratislava include U Sedliaka (traditional Slovakian food), Mezcalli (Mexican food), and Next Apache (a small cafe that sells used books).

Backpacking Slovakia Suggested Budgets

If you are backpacking Slovakia, my suggested budget is 45 EUR per day. This assumes you’re staying in a hostel dorm, cooking all of your meals, doing free activities like walking tours and hiking, limiting your drinking, visiting some cheap attractions like museums or galleries, and using public transportation to get around.

On a mid-range budget of 105 EUR per day, you can stay in a private Airbnb apartment, eat out for most of your meals at budget-friendly restaurants serving traditional cuisine, go out for some drinks, take some guided tours, visit more paid attractions like the caves, and take the occasional taxi to get around.

On a “luxury” budget of 200 EUR, you can stay in a hotel, eat out at any restaurant you want, rent a car, drink as much as you want, and see as many castles and museums as you can handle! This is just the ground floor for luxury though. The sky is the limit!

You can use the chart below to get some idea of how much you need to budget daily, depending on your travel style. Keep in mind these are daily averages — some days you’ll spend more, some days you’ll spend less (you might spend less every day). We just want to give you a general idea of how to make your budget. Prices are in EUR.

Slovakia Travel Guide: Money-Saving Tips

Slovakia is one of the cheaper Central European countries and it’s easy here to travel on a budget. That said, if you’re looking for ways to trim your expenses, here are my favorite ways to save money in the country:

  • Take a free walking tour – Bratislava offers a handful of free walking tours which are a great way to get familiar with the city and its culture on a budget. Be Free Tours is the most popular tour company. Just be sure to tip your guide at the end!
  • Ride Flixbus – Flixbus is a budget-friendly way to get around the country (as well as the region). They have Wi-Fi, electrical outlets, and decent enough seats for overnight and long-haul bus journeys.
  • Cook your own meals – Book accommodation with a kitchen so you can cook your own meals. Buying your own groceries may not be as glamorous as going out to eat, but it does save money.
  • Get outdoors – The easiest way to keep active and save money is to get outdoors and explore Slovakia’s national parks. Most don’t charge an entry fee. Nature fills your days and avoids slimming your wallet!
  • Wild camp – If you really want to save money in Slovakia, bring your tent as wild camping is legal. You can pitch your tent on almost all public land throughout Slovakia. Just avoid national parks and forests.
  • Stay with a local – Staying with a local via Couchsurfing is a great way to not only save money, but you’ll also connect with a knowledgeable local who can help you better understand the country and its people.
  • Bring a reusable water bottle – The tap water in Slovakia is safe so bring a reusable water bottle to avoid single-use plastic. A filtered bottle like LifeStraw ensures your water is safe and clean. It’s perfect for anyone planning to hike or explore the country’s national parks.

Where to Stay in Slovakia

The hostel scene in Slovakia does not disappoint. Most have reliable Wi-Fi, kitchens, and are clean and modern. Here are some of my favorite places to stay in Slovakia:

  • Hostel Folks (Bratislava)
  • Wild Elephants Hostel (Bratislava)
  • The Ginger Monkey (High Tatras)
  • Happy Bull (Kosice)
  • Nitra Glycerin Hostel (Nitra)

How to Get Around Slovakia

An aerial view of Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, featuring historic buildings and plenty of greenery

Public transportation – For public transportation around cities, the fare is generally proportional to the duration of the journey. For example, in Bratislava, a 30-minute ride costs 0.90 EUR while a 60-minute ride costs 1.20 EUR. Day passes are available in most of the cities for around 4.50 EUR.

Bus – Flixbus is the most budget-friendly option to explore the country. The bus from Bratislava to Košice costs 22 EUR for the 6.5-hour journey. For Bratislava to Budapest, Hungary, the 2.5-hour bus ride ranges from 12-26 EUR while the one-hour trip from Bratislava to Vienna, Austria can be done for 9 EUR.

Trains – Trains are more expensive than buses and don’t reach as many destinations in the country. However, they’re a lot quicker. Bratislava to Poprad takes around 4 hours and costs 15 EUR. The 5.5-hour journey to Košice costs 18 EUR. The 2.5-hour trip to Budapest, Hungary costs 10 EUR while the 90-minute ride to Vienna, Austria costs 5 EUR.

Budget Airlines – There are no domestic flights around Slovakia.

Car Rental – Car rentals can be as low as 25 EUR per day for a multi-day rental. You need an International Driver’s Permit (IDP) to rent a vehicle.

When to Go to Slovakia

Slovakia has four distinct seasons. The summers are sunny and hot and see the biggest influx of visitors. July-August is the most popular time to visit, with daily highs around 27°C (81°F).

During the shoulder seasons, you avoid both the heat and the crowds. The best months to visit are between May-June or September-October, especially if you’re hiking. There are cooler temperatures and, in the fall, you get to see the leaves change. Expect temperatures around 20°C (68°F).

Winter is cold and snowy with temperatures dropping below freezing so I’d only visit if you plan on doing some winter sports, such as skiing.

How to Stay Safe in Slovakia

Slovakia is a very safe country to visit; it’s the 19th safest country in the world. Violent crime against tourists is virtually nonexistent. Pickpocketing can occur, however, especially in high-traffic areas such as Bratislava’s Old Town. Keep your valuables safely tucked away when in public just to be safe.

Solo female travelers should feel safe here, though the standard precautions apply (never leave your drink unattended at the bar, never walk home alone intoxicated, etc.).

If someone strikes up a conversation with you trying to sell something or if young children approach you, be on alert — their friend may be reaching for your wallet while you’re distracted.

If you’re worried about getting scammed, read this post on common travel scams to avoid.

If you rent a car, don’t leave any valuables in it while you’re hiking or overnight. Break-ins are rare but it’s better to be safe than sorry.

If you’re hiking here (especially doing alpine hiking in the mountains), make sure you let your hostel/hotel staff know just in case. Always bring a first aid kit as well as basic gear like a flashlight, raincoat, and extra food just in case.

If you experience an emergency, dial 158 for assistance.

Always trust your gut instinct. Make copies of your personal documents, including your passport and ID. Forward your itinerary along to loved ones so they know where you are.

The most important piece of advice I can offer is to purchase good travel insurance. Travel insurance will protect you against illness, injury, theft, and cancellations. It’s comprehensive protection in case anything goes wrong. I never go on a trip without it as I’ve had to use it many times in the past. You can use the widget below to find the policy right for you:

Slovakia Travel Guide: The Best Booking Resources

These are my favorite companies to use when I travel. They consistently have the best deals, offer world-class customer service and great value, and overall, are better than their competitors. They are the companies I use the most and are always the starting point in my search for travel deals.

  • Skyscanner – Skyscanner is my favorite flight search engine. They search small websites and budget airlines that larger search sites tend to miss. They are hands down the number one place to start.
  • Hostelworld – This is the best hostel accommodation site out there with the largest inventory, best search interface, and widest availability.
  • Booking.com – The best all around booking site that constantly provides the cheapest and lowest rates. They have the widest selection of budget accommodation. In all my tests, they’ve always had the cheapest rates out of all the booking websites.
  • Get Your Guide – Get Your Guide is a huge online marketplace for tours and excursions. They have tons of tour options available in cities all around the world, including everything from cooking classes, walking tours, street art lessons, and more!
  • SafetyWing – Safety Wing offers convenient and affordable plans tailored to digital nomads and long-term travelers. They have cheap monthly plans, great customer service, and an easy-to-use claims process that makes it perfect for those on the road.
  • LifeStraw – My go-to company for reusable water bottles with built-in filters so you can ensure your drinking water is always clean and safe.
  • Unbound Merino – They make lightweight, durable, easy-to-clean travel clothing.
  • Top Travel Credit Cards – Points are the best way to cut down travel expenses. Here’s my favorite point earning credit cards so you can get free travel!
  • BlaBlaCar – BlaBlaCar is a ridesharing website that lets you share rides with vetted local drivers by pitching in for gas. You simply request a seat, they approve, and off you go! It’s a cheaper and more interesting way to travel than by bus or train!

Slovakia Travel Guide: Related Articles

Want more info? Check out all the articles I’ve written on backpacking/traveling Europe and continue planning your trip:

How to Be a Digital Nomad in Europe

How to Be a Digital Nomad in Europe

The Best eSIM for Traveling Europe

The Best eSIM for Traveling Europe

The 6 Best Hotels in Athens

The 6 Best Hotels in Athens

The 6 Best Hotels in Stockholm

The 6 Best Hotels in Stockholm

The 8 Best Hotels in Amsterdam

The 8 Best Hotels in Amsterdam

The 8 Best Hotels in Rome

The 8 Best Hotels in Rome

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Earn six figures — mostly non-taxable — as a travel nurse

Registered traveling nurses in New York.

These health care professionals earn excellent pay by filling temporarily open spots at health care facilities around the country.

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Anthony Swain, 32, and his wife earn six-figure incomes while traveling the country for work. And they pay tax on just a fraction of their income. Such is the life of a travel nurse. These health care professionals earn excellent pay — much of it non-taxable — filling temporarily open spots at health care facilities around the country.

And, thanks to an exodus of nurses during the pandemic, demand for travel nurses is strong, with some 20,000 more open travel nurse positions than at this time last year, according to Adzuna , a job search engine. Average pay for travel nurses also soared nearly 50 percent from five years ago to nearly $125,000 on average.

Moreover an aging baby boomer population almost guarantees high demand for nurses of all types for decades.

What is travel nursing? Why should you care? What does it take to qualify, if you’re not already a nurse? And where do you find these jobs? Here’s a question and answer look.

What is travel nursing?

The main difference between travel nursing and ordinary nursing is that travel nurses are assigned to temporary positions — usually lasting about three months — outside of their home cities or states. By and large, they’re able to pick and choose among assignments, opting to work in cities or facilities that are attractive to them.

Because this work is too far away from home to commute, travel nurses also are entitled to “per diem” compensation for food, lodging and incidental expenses (such as dry cleaning and tips). That’s in addition to their hourly or weekly pay. And, generally speaking the per diem pay is non-taxable.

How much do you get in per diem pay?

That depends on where you travel and your contract. However, the General Services Administration publishes per diem rates that range from about $166 per day to well over $350 per day, depending on the city and state where you travel.

So, in a typical month, a travel nurse might earn $6,000 for the job and $9,000 for the per-diem (calculated here as $300 per day for 30 days). And, because the aim of per diem compensation is to help you recover additional work expenses that you wouldn’t normally have, this portion of your pay is tax-free.

Why would I care about this if I’m not already a nurse?

You wouldn’t, unless you’re unhappy or insecure in your current profession. If either of those is the case, nursing is worth considering.

Nursing is one of a handful of professions that has a fairly low barrier to entry. You can secure entry-level nursing positions after completing just a few classes that you can complete while working at another full-time job.

To be sure, the best-paid nursing jobs require at least some college and more training. However, many nurses complete both the educational and practical requirements while working, often with economic support from the medical facilities where they work.

And the demand for nurses is likely to remain strong for decades, which makes this a profession that offers a great deal of job security. (The University of St. Augustine has a nice primer on the different types of nursing and the education and testing required. )

When not to consider nursing

That said, don’t consider nursing unless you’re able to handle the physical demands, which require you to be on your feet the bulk of the day. Additionally, you need to be empathetic and psychologically strong enough to handle dealing with people who are sick and, sometimes, dying.

You also need to be good in a crisis. In this field, crises are literally about life and death and one could strike at any time.

Can I be a travel nurse as soon as I get a nursing degree or certification?

No. Generally, you’ll need at least one and, preferably, two years of practical experience to qualify as a travel nurse.

Explain the per diem pay again. What’s the catch?

You do need to follow a bunch of tax rules to establish that your “domicile” is far enough away from your work that you can’t simply go home to eat and sleep. And you must spend enough time in this “domicile” every year to convince the IRS that it’s legitimately your home base.

You also need to only accept assignments of less than a year in states and/or cities away from your home.

Moreover, you’ll need to keep records showing that you paid for accommodations and food during these temporary assignments — as well as records showing the expenses you paid for your home.

So you do need two homes. Does that eliminate the economic benefit?

It could. But most travel nurses are smart enough to economize in ways that make the arrangement work to their financial advantage. It’s best when your home base is in a low-cost city or state and your nursing position is in a high-cost area, Swain explains.

Swain, for example, says his home state is in a small town in Pennsylvania. In his home town, you can rent a three-bedroom home for less than $1,200. Meanwhile, he and his wife have worked in California, Washington, D.C., Maryland and many other high cost states, where per diem rates can hit $350 per day.

Because they both work in travel nursing and both get per diem stipends, they “economize ” by living together. And, since the per diem is non-taxable, they only pay tax on about 60 percent of their income. Better yet, they’re using travel nursing to decide where they want to permanently settle. Most jobs don’t offer that type of geographic flexibility.

Where can you find travel nursing work?

Dozens of agencies around the country offer travel nursing positions. These agencies typically hire travel nurses as employees and then farm them out to health care facilities around the country that have a temporary need.

Some worth noting:

American Mobile Healthcare , Cross Country Nurses , and Trusted Health . All three of these companies serve as agent/employers. So, nurses sign up, choose and apply to nursing assignments offered through these agencies. The agency gets paid by the health care facility. The agency pays and employs the nurse.

That means that nurses are likely to get benefits, such as health insurance and retirement plans, which might otherwise be unavailable for temporary workers.

Vivian Health is another good option. This site is a health care marketplace where nurses can find both travel and local nursing positions posted by health care facilities and staffing agencies. This provides a substantially wider variety of work options than traditional staffing agencies. To be specific, on a recent check, Vivian posted more than 149,000 travel nursing openings vs. 6,400 travel nursing jobs posted at Cross Country Nurses.

Kristof is the editor of SideHusl.com, an independent website that reviews moneymaking opportunities in the gig economy.

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FILE - A Boeing 737 MAX 7 takes off on its first flight on March 16, 2018, in Renton, Wash. Facing severe criticism after a door plug blew out on a 737 Max over Oregon this month, Boeing said Monday, Jan. 29, 2024, that it is withdrawing a request for a safety exemption needed to certify the new model of the plane. (AP Photo/Jason Redmond, File)

Facing scrutiny over quality control, Boeing withdraws request for safety exemption

Boeing says it is withdrawing a request for a safety exemption needed to certify a new model of its 737 Max airliner

FILE - Nicholas Hartnett, owner of Pure Power Solar, carries a panel as he and Brian Hoeppner, right, install a solar array on the roof of a home in Frankfort, Ky., Monday, July 17, 2023. President Joe Biden has been careful not to declare an outright victory against inflation, but the White House says the cost savings from the Inflation Reduction Act are coming as the law is getting enacted. Tax credits will reduce the cost of installing rooftop solar panels by 30%, which will in turn lower monthly electricity bills. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy, File)

Critics of California’s recent change in solar rules take their case to state Supreme Court

Three groups challenge an appeals court ruling that upheld the California Public Utilities Commission’s NEM 3 decision

FILE - A vehicle stops at Terminal 1 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Feb. 17, 2023. The pilots of an American Airlines plane taxied across the wrong runway last year in New York — into the path of another jetliner that was taking off — after the captain became distracted and confused about takeoff instructions and the co-pilot lost track of their plane's location, according to documents released Monday, Jan. 29, 2024. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Investigators detail how an American Airlines jet crossed a runway in front of a Delta plane at JFK

Federal investigators are providing new details about a close call last year at JFK Airport in New York

Jan. 29, 2024

US Steel agrees to $42M in improvements and fines over air pollution violations after 2018 fire

U.S. Steel has agreed to settle a lawsuit that accused the Pittsburgh-based steel producer of violating federal clean air laws by operating plants without its desulfurization controls for more than three months, emitting clouds of sulfurous gas into surrounding towns

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Bill to ban smoking in Atlantic City casinos moves forward on 4th try in New Jersey Legislature

A measure that would prohibit smoking in Atlantic City’s casinos has moved forward after three years of going nowhere

Ukraine-Russia war latest: Putin opponent vanishes - and UK 'deeply concerned' for him

The British-Russian dissident Vladimir Kara-Murza has disappeared from a penal colony - and Lord Cameron has called on Moscow to reveal his location to his lawyers.

Monday 29 January 2024 23:35, UK

Vladimir Kara-Murza behind a glass wall during a court hearing. Pic: Reuters

  • British-Russian dissident disappears from penal colony | UK 'deeply concerned'
  • Hungary signals it could compromise on aid for Ukraine
  • Russia claims it has taken control of Kharkiv village
  • Kremlin continues efforts to destabilise Moldova

That's it for our live coverage today, but before you go, here is a quick recap of the key developments.

Missing prisoner: David Cameron said he was "deeply concerned" after the disappearance of a British-Russian dissident from a Siberian penal colony, and called on Moscow to reveal the man's location to his lawyers.

Kharkiv battles: Ukraine denied Moscow's claims that its forces took control of the village of Tabaivka in Ukraine's northeastern Kharkiv region.

Defence corruption: Employees from a Ukrainian arms firm conspired with defence ministry officials to embezzle more than £31m earmarked to buy 100,000 mortar shells, the Ukrainian security service said.

World Court: The International Court of Justice announced it will decide whether it shall hear a case brought by Ukraine accusing Russia of violating international law on Friday.

'Civilian deaths': The Russian-installed mayor of Donetsk reported at least three civilians were killed in a rocket strike. 

European Union envoys have agreed unanimously to set aside billions of euros of windfall profits from Russian central bank assets frozen in Europe.

Ambassadors of the 27 EU countries agreed in principle the first step of a plan to help fund Ukraine reconstruction after Russia's invasion, according to a source from Belgium. 

The text will undergo legal and language checks before the ambassadors will have the chance formally to adopt it.

The European Commission would then be expected to propose transferring the money set aside to the EU budget and subsequently to Kyiv, though it is unclear when it would arrive in Ukraine. 

France and Germany have already voiced reservations about the plan, while the European Central Bank has warned it could undermine confidence in the euro and unsettle global markets.

The EU, United States, Japan and Canada froze some $300bn of Russian central bank assets in 2022. About $200bn of that is held in Europe, mainly in the Belgian clearing house Euroclear. 

By  Deborah Haynes , security and defence editor

Ukraine would win the war faster if it had permission to fire British and other Western weapons against targets deep inside Russia, the head of the Ukrainian navy has indicated.

Vice Admiral Oleksiy Neizhpapa told Sky News the course of the entire conflict would have been very different had Ukrainian forces been allowed to use Western munitions without restrictions from the very beginning.

In a wide-ranging interview, the Ukrainian commander also said his navy would gladly take charge of two British warships the Royal Navy which reportedly may have to retire early because of a shortage of sailors.

Read on here...

Lord Cameron has called on Moscow to reveal the location of a Russian-British dissident who disappeared from his penal colony to his lawyers.

The UK foreign secretary pledged to meet with Vladimir Kara-Murza's wife, Evgenia, who said her husband was taken from a Siberian penal colony and his whereabouts were unknown.

Family and friends of Mr Kara-Murza urged Lord Cameron to act earlier today.

Now the foreign secretary has posted on X: "Russia must urgently provide Vladimir Kara-Murza's lawyers with his whereabouts, following reports that he has been moved from Omsk to an unknown location.

"I'm deeply concerned for Mr Kara-Murza - a British national imprisoned in Russia for speaking out against the invasion of Ukraine. I stand with his wife and plan to meet her soon."

Mr Kara-Murza, who suffers from a nerve disorder after surviving two poison attacks, was jailed for 25 years last April for treason and spreading "false information" about the Russian war in Ukraine. 

He denied the charges and said he was facing a show trial. 

Employees from a Ukrainian arms firm conspired with defence ministry officials to embezzle more than £31m earmarked to buy 100,000 mortar shells, the Ukrainian security service has said.

The SBU said five people have been charged and if found guilty, they could face up to 12 years in prison.

The investigation comes as Kyiv attempts to clamp down on corruption in a bid to speed up its membership in the European Union and NATO.

The investigation dates back to August 2022, when officials signed a contract for artillery shells worth 1.5bn hryvnias (£31.1m) with arms firm Lviv Arsenal, security officials said.

After receiving payment, company employees were supposed to transfer the funds to a business registered abroad, which would then deliver the ammunition to Ukraine.

But the goods were never delivered and the money was instead sent to various accounts in Ukraine and the Balkans, investigators said.

Ukraine's prosecutor general said the funds have since been seized and will be returned to the country's defence budget.

Volodymyr Zelenskyy was elected on an anti-corruption platform in 2019 and has portrayed sacking top officials as proof of his administration's efforts to crack down on corruption.

Hungarian opposition parties have submitted a motion calling for an extraordinary session of parliament to ratify Sweden's application to join NATO on 5 February.

Hungary is the only country in the 31-member Atlantic alliance yet to ratify Sweden's application.

Turkey completed its approval last week, some 20 months after Stockholm applied to join NATO following Russia's invasion.

"Our motion has been sent to the speaker... Now the question is whether 135 men will be brave enough to show up," said Zita Gurmai, an opposition politician, referring to whether members of parliament from the governing parties will vote for the motion.

Viktor Orban, the Hungarian prime minister, said last week he would urge politicians to approve Sweden's accession at the first possible opportunity, but parliamentary speaker Laszlo Kover said there was no urgency.

The World Court has announced it will decide whether it shall hear a case brought by Ukraine accusing Russia of violating international law on Friday.

Russia has justified its invasion by claiming it was launched to stop a genocide of Russian speakers in Ukraine - claims that Kyiv argues is a breach of the 1948 Genocide Convention given there was no risk of genocide.

The legal battle refers to fighting between Russian-backed forces and Ukraine in the country's east since 2014.

Lawyers for Moscow have urged judges to throw out the case, saying Ukraine is using it as a roundabout way to get a ruling on the overall legality of Russia's invasion.

If the UN court, also known as the International Court of Justice, does decide the Ukraine-Russia case can move forward, it could take many months before hearings on the merits are scheduled. 

Ukraine and Hungary are interested in holding a meeting between their leaders as soon as possible, top Ukrainian presidential official Andriy Yermak says.

He added the two countries had agreed to form a commission that would prepare proposals on the rights of the ethnic Hungarian minority living in Ukraine, reported Evropeiska Pravda.

His comments come after a meeting with Hungarian foreign minister Peter Szijjarto, following tensions between Budapest and Kyiv over the issue. 

It appears to indicate a shift in relations between Hungary and Ukraine

Hungary's prime minister Viktor Orban has retained cordial ties with Russia despite Moscow's invasion, and has been a vocal critic of the EU's financial and military support for Kyiv.

But earlier today, Mr Orban's political director said Hungary was open to using the EU budget for a proposed €50bn aid package to Ukraine that it had once blocked.

Russia has the resources to keep replacing tanks and combat vehicles despite a recent spike in losses, according to British military intelligence.

This means it can continue to pursue offensive action at the same level that it has done since October, said the UK Ministry of Defence.

But its recent spate of vehicle losses has only resulted in "minor territorial gains", it said.

Russian ground forces lost 40% fewer vehicles in 2023 than in 2022 after spending much of last year on the defensive.

In 2022, 2,600 of its tanks and 4,900 armoured combat vehicles (ACVs) were destroyed in Ukraine.

Since October, renewed Russian offensives in the east have seen the rate of losses increase again.

Ground forces have likely lost 365 tanks and 700 AVCs in that time period.

The UK MoD said: "However, Russia can probably generate at least 100 main battle tanks a month and therefore retains the capacity to replace battlefield losses and continue this level of offensive action for the foreseeable future."

Vladimir Putin and the president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, have been attending a meeting of the Union State Supreme Council in St Petersburg, Russia.

During the meeting, the pair will seek to approve guidelines for the next three years of integration between the two nations, according to the Kremlin.

The Union State of Belarus and Russia is composed of a series of treaties deepening cooperation on economic and defence policies since the 1990s.

Some experts have suggested it has seen Vladimir Putin assert more and more control over Russia's neighbour. 

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travel to slovakia to work

United States of America, Department of State

U.S. Embassy in Slovakia

Social / search, it’s now simpler for slovaks to work in america.

Entrepreneurship and innovation are the keys to turbocharging today’s industries and unlocking job growth in the industries of tomorrow. Slovakia’s smaller size inspires Slovak innovators and entrepreneurs to pursue a global outlook, with products that appeal to the international marketplace. However, dynamic companies both here and in the United States often complain that bureaucratic difficulties in obtaining work visas are an impediment to their ability to attract the human capital they need.

As of January 1, changes to Slovak and U.S. law have made trans-Atlantic collaboration much easier, as our governments have successfully partnered to extend the validity period of U.S. visas for Slovak workers in the United States and of residency permits for American workers here in Slovakia. Both can now be issued for up to five years, a significant increase from the previous two-year limit. As a result, employees in both our countries will have to renew their visas or residency permits less often, saving significant time and expense.

As any of the new titans of tech will tell you, a modern company’s greatest asset in a knowledge-based economy is its workforce – its employees’ unique talents and boundless vision. For Slovakia’s entrepreneurs and innovators to “make it big” on the global stage and succeed in the globally competitive modern business landscape, they need to be able to share ideas with their colleagues abroad, exchanging knowledge and talent with peers in California as easily as with those in Kosice.

This improved and extended work visa agreement represents another positive step by the Slovak government to improve the business climate for entrepreneurs, following last year’s package of reforms designed to cut red tape, make it easier to start a business, and provide financial incentives for start-ups. The U.S. Embassy is excited to support this focus on fostering the growth of innovation and entrepreneurship. However, we also know the economic landscape will continue shift quickly as technology continues to accelerate the speed of innovation. We look forward to continuing our work together with Slovak partners on these important efforts in 2016 and beyond.

By U.S. Embassy Bratislava | 29 January, 2016 | Topics: Op-Eds | Tags: Wasley

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30th Anniversary of Slovak Independence and U.S.-Slovak Diplomatic Relations

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A New Chapter in our Story of Freedom

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APS

People Are Inclined to Hide a Contagious Illness While Around Others, Research Shows

  • Decision Making
  • Health Decision Making
  • Psychological Science
  • Public Health
  • Social Behavior

travel to slovakia to work

A startling number of people conceal an infectious illness to avoid missing work, travel, or social events, new research at the University of Michigan suggests.  

The findings are reported in Psychological Science . Across a series of studies involving healthy and sick adults, 75% of the 4,110 participants said they had either hidden an infectious illness from others at least once or might do so in the future. Many participants reported boarding planes, going on dates, and engaging in other social interactions while secretly sick. More than 61% of healthcare workers participating in the study also said they had concealed an infectious illness.  

Interestingly, the researchers found a difference between how people believe they would act when ill and how they actually behave, said Wilson N. Merrell, a doctoral candidate and lead author on the study.  

“Healthy people forecasted that they would be unlikely to hide harmful illnesses—those that spread easily and have severe symptoms—but actively sick people reported high levels of concealment regardless of how harmful their illness was to others,” Merrell said. 

In the first study, Merrell and his colleagues—APS Fellow Joshua M. Ackerman and PhD student Soyeon Choi—recruited 399 university healthcare employees and 505 students. The participants reported the number of days they felt symptoms of an infectious illness, starting in March 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic began. They then rated how often they actively covered up symptoms from others, came to campus or work without telling others they were feeling ill, or falsified mandatory symptom screeners that the university had required for anyone using campus facilities.  

More than 70% of the participants reported covering up their symptoms. Many said they hid their illness because it would conflict with social plans, while a small percentage of participants cited pressure from institutional policies (e.g., lack of paid time off). Only five participants reported hiding a COVID-19 infection. 

In a second study, the researchers recruited 946 participants online and randomly assigned them to one of nine conditions in which they imagined being either moderately or severely sick while in a social situation. In each condition, the risk of spreading the illness was designated as low, medium, or high. (To control for the special stigma associated with COVID-19 at the time, the researchers asked participants not to imagine being sick with that disease.) Participants were most likely to envision themselves hiding their sickness when symptom severity was low, and least likely to conceal when symptoms were severe and highly communicable. 

In another study, Merrell and colleagues used an online research tool to recruit 900 people—including some who were actively sick—and asked them to rate the transmissibility of their real or imagined illness. The participants were also asked to rate their likelihood of covering up an illness in a hypothetical meeting with another person.  

Results showed that compared to healthy participants who only imagined being sick, those who were actively ill were more likely to conceal their illness regardless of its transmissibility.   

“This suggests that sick people and healthy people evaluate the consequences of concealment in different ways,” Merrell said, “with sick people being relatively insensitive to how spreadable and severe their illness may be for others.” 

The COVID-19 crisis may have shaped the way the participants thought about concealing an illness, Merrell said, adding that future research could explore how ecological factors (e.g., pandemics) and medical advances such as vaccines influence people’s disease-related behavior. The research team is also expanding this line of investigation to other countries to uncover potential cultural differences in concealment behaviors, he said.

Related content: The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Psychological Science Timeline

Overall, the findings carry significant public health implications, illuminating the motivations and tradeoffs we make in social interactions when we’re sick, Merrell added.   

“After all, people tend to react negatively to, find less attractive, and steer clear of people who are sick with infectious illness,” he said. “It therefore makes sense that we may take steps to cover up our sickness in social situations. This suggests that solutions to the problem of disease concealment may need to rely on more than just individual good will.”

Feedback on this article? Email  [email protected]  or login to comment .

Merrell, W. N., Choi, S., & Ackerman, J. M. (2024). When and why people conceal infectious disease.  Psychological Science ,  0 (0).  https://doi.org/10.1177/09567976231221990  

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Privacy Overview

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has spent more than $200,000 of taxpayer funds on private jet travel: report

  • Independent Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has spent more than $200,000 of taxpayer cash on private jet travel.
  • It's not illegal for her to do so; senators are allotted around $4 million each year for the office.
  • She's also spent thousands of dollars in campaign cash on travel and lodging in places she competed.

Insider Today

Independent Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has spent more than $200,000 of her congressional office budget on private jet travel, according to a new report from The Daily Beast .

By adding up the amount of money Sinema has spent on chartered flights as published in the semiannual " Report of the Secretary of the Senate, " the publication found she's paid travel companies around $210,000 since 2020, a year after she began her time in Congress.

As a member of the Senate, via the Senators' Official Personnel and Office Expense Account, Sinema is granted around $4 million each fiscal year to spend on paying her staff, transporting herself to and from her home in Arizona, supplies, and any other work expenses.

As The Daily Beast noted, senators have very few restrictions on allocating their yearly office allowance; there's nothing illegal about Sinema spending more than her yearly salary on private jet travel over the past four years.

Nevertheless, Sinema's spending on chartered flights isn't the first time she's circumvented personally paying luxurious travel expenses. In May 2023, The Daily Beast reported she spent significant amounts of campaign cash on flights and lodging in areas of the country where she competed in various marathons and triathlons without repercussion.

Sinema's reasoning for using private flights may be to avoid wasting time, as the original report noted, but another reason is just as possible: personal safety.

In 2021, as she opposed President Joe Biden's "Build Back Better" plan, protesters ambushed the senator in the bathroom at Arizona State University, where she teaches courses on social and public policy.

Additionally, she's spent more than $560,000 on personal security using campaign funds during her time in office, more than the vast majority of members of Congress spend on it.

Outside her congressional duties, Sinema's currently campaigning for a second term in office, though she's running this time as an independent rather than on the Democratic ticket. In November, she'll likely face off against former gubernatorial Republican candidate Kari Lake, and Democratic Rep. Ruben Gallego.

Representatives from Sinema's office did not respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

travel to slovakia to work

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travel to slovakia to work

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IMAGES

  1. 14 Best Places In Slovakia To Visit

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  2. TOP THINGS TO DO IN BRATISLAVA, SLOVAKIA

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  3. The Ultimate Travel Guide to Slovakia

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  4. 10 Best Things to Do in Slovakia

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  5. Slovakia work permit

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  6. Five of the Best Places to Visit in Slovakia

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  1. #Dovolenka na Slovensku dobrý nápad

  2. Slovakia work permit| Schengen work permit visa

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  5. Slovakia 🇸🇰 Slovenia 🇸🇮 work visa update/Trc change other country @Parmhungary

  6. Slovakia Work Permit Visa 2023. Jobs for Indians in Slovakia.#yourvisamate #slovakiajobs #workpermit

COMMENTS

  1. Travel to Slovakia for work

    If you're going to Slovakia to work (or any other EU country, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland or Liechtenstein) you must make sure you meet passport and other travel requirements. Slovakia is...

  2. Complete Guide: Getting Work in Slovakia As a Foreigner

    Slovakia is a fairly decent country to work in. It offers a wide range of jobs and nice pay. Depending on if you are an EEA citizen or a third-country citizen, you might need to obtain a work permit. This means you need a National Visa and a residence permit.

  3. How to Get a Slovakia Work Visa & Work Permit: Requirements ...

    Generally, a Slovakia work visa requires the following steps: Select the appropriate visa, bearing in mind that EU/common market citizens do not require a visa. The most common options will be the EU Blue Card or the Single Permit Prepare vacancy/advertise the relevant job, an obligation for employers where this is a requirement for the visa.

  4. Slovakia Work Visa

    You need a visa to work in Slovakia if: You are a national from a non-EU/EEA country, and you got a job in Slovakia. You are a national from a country that has a visa agreement with Slovakia, but you plan on staying and working in the country for more than 90 days.

  5. Slovakia

    The fee for applying for temporary residence for the purpose of employment is EUR 165.50 (if the application is submitted at the Foreign Police Department) or EUR 170 (if the application is submitted at the Slovak embassy). Documents required. Work permit. To obtain a work permit, you or your employer must submit:

  6. Information on Entering Slovakia Through the External (non-Schengen

    Airports in Slovakia are small and do not offer any connecting flights to the U.S. Travelers in Slovakia flying to the U.S. generally board their first flight in Vienna, Budapest, or Prague. Neighboring countries may have different rules on COVID-19 vaccination, testing, and quarantine requirements.

  7. Work and Travel in Slovakia. Volunteer & work visa info for backpackers

    Fellow European Union (EU) citizens are part of the free movement zone and can stay and work in Slovakia for as long as they want without a visa. North Americans, Australians, Kiwis, the Japanese, and South Koreans are able to get a Schengen Visa on arrival. This entitles them to 90 days in the whole zone.

  8. Visa to Slovakia for ALL Countries (Work, Student, and more)

    Application for the granting of a national visa, if it is necessary to fulfill the obligations of the Slovak Republic or in the interest of the Slovak Republic. €35. Application for the granting of a national visa in connection with the submission of an application for residence in the Slovak Republic. €60.

  9. Work in Slovakia

    Profesia - Job Portal Profesia - pracovný portál Additional national services to work in Slovakia Helpful EU services Living and working in Slovakia EURES is a network of employment services covering all EU countries as well as Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland. Your Europe

  10. Slovakia: Work, Residence And Business Travel In Slovakia For UK

    Third-country nationals coming to stay and work in Slovakia for more than 90 days must obtain a Single Permit or a work permit and a residence permit for employment purposes, which involves a complicated application process. 2.2 What documents are needed on arrival for business travel from 1 January 2021?

  11. Summer Work & Travel Program

    Participants attending universities in Slovakia are allowed to work in the U.S. between May 15th and September 15th and must return to Slovakia by the beginning of the fall semester at their universities. The Summer Work & Travel program is not for visitors who only want to travel in the United States. Procedural Guidelines

  12. Slovakia International Travel Information

    July 26, 2023 Slovakia - Level 1: Exercise Normal Precautions Exercise normal precautions in Slovakia. ... [READ MORE] Embassy Messages Alerts View Alerts and Messages Archive Quick Facts PASSPORT VALIDITY: Six months beyond the intended date of departure BLANK PASSPORT PAGES: One page required for entry stamp TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

  13. Work and travel in Slovakia: International Experience Canada

    To work in Slovakia through the Youth Mobility program, you must: be a Canadian citizen be 18-35 years old (inclusive), live in Canada when applying, and have a valid Canadian passport Other requirements may apply, check Slovakia's website for more details. What type of work visa do I need? Do I need a formal job or internship offer?

  14. Leto v Amerike

    Summer Work and Travel program through the eyes of its par­ti­ci­pants. "A person's horizons will expand, it will enrich them with various valuable experiences that are difficult to obtain in ordinary, everyday life." Viktória Tarnoková. ""Work and Travel USA brings great benefits - it's not so much about earned money, but mainly about ...

  15. Moving to Slovakia

    Third-country nationals wishing to move to Slovakia for a period longer than three months (90 days) need to obtain a D visa (long-stay visa), also known as a national visa. The type of long-stay visa you apply for depends on the purpose of your travel to Slovakia. For example, you can get a long-stay visa for work, studies, family reunification ...

  16. Slovakia

    a contract of employment for the performance of highly-qualified work with the duration of at least one year from the date on which the Blue Card is issued and with the minimum monthly salary of at least 1.5 times the average monthly wage in the Slovak national economy in the relevant branch, as published by the Statistical Office of the Slovak ...

  17. Slovakia

    COVID-19 travel restrictions were lifted in Slovakia. Travellers are not required to provide proof of vaccination, recovery from COVID-19 or a negative test result. Learn more: Public Health Authority _____ You can find the latest information on air travel regulations for this country on the IATA website.

  18. Travel advice and advisories for Slovakia

    Canadians who intend to work or plan to remain in Slovakia for more than 90 days must obtain a temporary residence permit. Failure to obtain a residence permit for stays of over 90 days could result in deportation. Deportation from Slovakia will also mean expulsion from the greater Schengen area. Other entry requirements

  19. Slovakia Travel Advisory

    Reissued with obsolete COVID-19 page links removed. Exercise normal precautions in Slovakia. Read the country information page for additional information on travel to Slovakia.. If you decide to travel to Slovakia: Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.; Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.

  20. COVID-19 Information

    As of April 6, 2022, all COVID-19 requirements for entry to Slovakia were cancelled, regardless of vaccination status. As of April 21, 2022, masks are only required to be worn in healthcare settings. Children under the age of 6 years are exempt from all mask requirements. Is a negative COVID-19 test (PCR and/or serology) required for entry? No.

  21. Slovakia Travel Guide (Updated 2024)

    1. Explore Bratislava Bratislava is Slovakia's capital and largest city. Bordering both Austria and Hungary, its position on the banks of the Danube make it an obvious point of entry for most travelers. Don't miss the city's Old Town and Bratislava Castle. There's also an eclectic music scene here. 2. Visit Košice

  22. Earn six figures

    However, the General Services Administration publishes per diem rates that range from about $166 per day to well over $350 per day, depending on the city and state where you travel. So, in a ...

  23. Ukraine-Russia war latest: Putin opponent vanishes

    By Deborah Haynes, security and defence editor. Ukraine would win the war faster if it had permission to fire British and other Western weapons against targets deep inside Russia, the head of the ...

  24. It's Now Simpler for Slovaks to Work in America

    As of January 1, changes to Slovak and U.S. law have made trans-Atlantic collaboration much easier, as our governments have successfully partnered to extend the validity period of U.S. visas for Slovak workers in the United States and of residency permits for American workers here in Slovakia.

  25. People Are Inclined to Hide a Contagious Illness While Around Others

    A startling number of people conceal an infectious illness to avoid missing work, travel, or social events, new research at the University of Michigan suggests. The findings are reported in Psychological Science. Across a series of studies involving healthy and sick adults, 75% of the 4,110 participants said they had either hidden an infectious ...

  26. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has spent more than $200,000 of taxpayer funds on

    Independent Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has spent more than $200,000 of her congressional office budget on private jet travel, according to a new report from The Daily Beast. By adding up the amount of ...

  27. Woman Shares Shady 'Hack' She Uses to Sit Alone on Plane

    In it, a woman is seen on a plane while the popular sound clip of Kim Kardashian saying "Because it's iconic and I love to do iconic sh**!" plays. The woman holds a hand to her face in mock ...

  28. Airbus partners with Tata Group to set up India's first helicopter

    New Delhi, In a major boost to 'Make in India', Airbus Helicopters has announced that it is partnering with the Tata Group to establish a Final Assembly Line (FAL) for helicopters in the country. The FAL will produce Airbus' best-selling H125 helicopter from its civil range for India and export to some of the neighbouring countries.. The FAL will be the first instance of the private ...

  29. China Will Start Visa-Free Travel With Singapore and Thailand

    1:50. China is set to start visa-free travel with Singapore and Thailand soon, as the world's second-largest economy ramps up efforts to encourage more cross-border exchanges. Citizens from ...