Breaking News English Lesson on Tourism

Home     |     help this site, dutch towns tell tourists how to behave    (14th april, 2017).

  • 26-page lesson  (40 exercises)
  • 2-page MINI lesson
  • North American & British English
  • 20 questions
  • Listen & spell
  • 4-speed reading
  • Text jumble
  • The / An / A
  • Prepositions
  • Missing letters
  • Initals only
  • Missing words

The Reading / Listening - Tourism - Level 6

It's great being a tourist and leisurely wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites, but is it such a thrill for the local residents? Villagers living in the area known as 'Old Holland' outside of Amsterdam have had enough of visitors traipsing around and of tour guides with megaphones disturbing their peace. They have got together with local tour companies to create rules of conduct for tourists. The rules include not photographing residents without permission, not strolling into their gardens and not dropping litter. The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing popularity of the region. Tourism is booming and the number of tourists is expected to rise by 50 per cent in the next decade.

Old Holland is an idyllic area that matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone age. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved, traditional wooden houses. Local resident Peter-Jan van Steenbergen told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is like an open-air museum. He said: "I talked to one resident who opened his curtains in the morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers." He added: "The visitors seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to see if it is real wood. If you are the resident of that house, that is not pleasant, of course." He said the busloads of tourists were the biggest nuisance.

Try the same news story at these easier levels:

     Tourism - Level 4   or  Tourism - Level 5

  • http://www. dutchnews.nl /news/archives/2017/03/tourists-told-to-behave-in-old-holland-as-popularity-surges/
  • http://www. bbc.com /news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-39281245
  • http://www. parool.nl /amsterdam/gedragsregels-moeten-overlast-in-old-holland-tegengaan~a4474122/

Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)

"Much has been said and written on the utility of newspapers; but one principal advantage which might be derived from these publications has been neglected; we mean that of reading them in schools." The Portland Eastern Herald (June 8, 1795)

"News is history in its first and best form, its vivid and fascinating form, and...history is the pale and tranquil reflection of it." Mark Twain, in his autobiography (1906)

"Current events provide authentic learning experiences for students at all grade levels.... In studying current events, students are required to use a range of cognitive, affective, critical thinking and research skills." Haas, M. and Laughlin, M. (2000) Teaching Current Events: It's Status in Social Studies Today.

Buy my 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers eBook. It has hundreds of ideas, activity templates, reproducible activities, and more.

Take a look...

  • E-mail this to a friend
--> 1. TOURISM: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about tourism. Change partners often and share your findings. 2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, talk about these topics or words from the article. What will the article say about them? What can you say about these words and your life?        leisurely / old towns / villages / thrill / tour guides / tourists / litter / popularity /        idyllic / windmills / preserved / traditional / museum / photographers / nuisance Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently. 3. RULES: Students A strongly believe there should be strict rules for tourists when they visit places; Students B strongly believe otherwise.  Change partners again and talk about your conversations. 4. CODE OF CONDUCT: Make some rules for tourists for these things? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners often and share what you wrote.   Rules Why? Clothes     Groups     Photos     Food     Local people     Souvenirs     MY e-BOOK See a sample 5. VISITOR: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word "visitor". Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories. 6. SITES: Rank these with your partner. Put the best at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings. The Amazon Machu Picchu Masai Mara Mount Fuji The Pyramids The Statue of Liberty The Great Wall of China Sydney Opera House   Before reading / listening 1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if a-h below are true (T) or false (F). The article said receiving tourists is a thrill for local people.      T / F 'Old Holland' is a part of central Amsterdam.      T / F New rules for tourists say there is to be no photography in villages.      T / F The number of tourists may increase by 50% in the next 10 years.      T / F 'Old Holland' does not fit people's idea of life in Holland in the past.      T / F A resident said one village was like an open-air museum.     T / F One resident opened his curtains to find 9 photographers outside.      T / F A resident said busloads of tourists were the most annoying thing.      T / F 2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article. leisurely thrill disturbing permission booming idyllic preserved resident real nuisance picturesque annoyance relaxed mushrooming local interrupting authentic excitement maintained say-so 3. PHRASE MATCH: (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.) leisurely wandering tour guides with megaphones deal with the growing popularity the number of tourists is expected to in the next an idyllic life from a slower, like an open- amateur busloads of tourists were the biggest nuisance rise by 50 per cent area bygone age around old towns photographers disturbing their peace decade air museum of the region Gap fill Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below. conduct litter leisurely decade enough permission thrill popularity

It's great being a tourist and (1) ____________ wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites, but is it such a (2) ____________ for the local residents? Villagers living in the area known as 'Old Holland' outside of Amsterdam have had (3) ____________ of visitors traipsing around and of tour guides with megaphones disturbing their peace. They have got together with local tour companies to create rules of (4) ____________ for tourists. The rules include not photographing residents without (5) ____________, not strolling into their gardens and not dropping (6) ____________. The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing (7) ____________ of the region. Tourism is booming and the number of tourists is expected to rise by 50 percent in the next (8) ____________.

air age real nuisance preserved pleasant idyllic resident

Old Holland is an (9) ____________ area that matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone (10) ____________. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully (11) ____________, traditional wooden houses. Local resident Peter-Jan van Steenbergen told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is like an open- (12) ____________ museum. He said: "I talked to one (13) ____________ who opened his curtains in the morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers." He added: "The visitors seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to see if it is (14) ____________ wood. If you are the resident of that house, that is not (15) ____________, of course." He said the busloads of tourists were the biggest (16) ____________.

Listening — Guess the answers. Listen to check.

1)  enough of visitors traipsing around and of tour guides with megaphones ______      a.  disturbing their piece      b.  disturbing there peace      c.  disturb in their peace      d.  disturbing their peace

2)  They have got together with local tour companies to create ______      a.  rules off conned duck      b.  rules of contract      c.  rules of conduct      d.  rules off conduit

3) photographing residents without permission, not strolling into their gardens and ______      a.  not drooping litter      b.  not dropping litter      c.  not dropping letter      d.  not drooping letter

4)  The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing popularity ______      a.  of the region      b.  of the regional      c.  of the regions      d.  of the legion

5)  the number of tourists is expected to rise by 50 per cent in ______      a.  the next decades      b.  a next decadence      c.  the next decade      d.  the next decadent

6)  matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, ______      a.  bygone age      b.  be gone age      c.  bye gone age      d.  beginning age

7)  told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is like an ______      a.  open-airy museum      b.  open-air museum      c.  open-aired museum      d.  open-airs museum

8) The visitors seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to see if ______      a.  it is real wood      b.  it is real wooden      c.  it is real woods      d.  it is real woody

9)  If you are the resident of that house, that ______      a.  is not pleasing      b.  is not pleasantry      c.  is not pheasant      d.  is not pleasant

10)  He said the busloads of tourists were the ______      a.  biggest nuance      b.  biggest nonsense      c.  biggest nuisance      d.  biggest nascence

Listening — Listen and fill in the gaps

It's great (1) ___________________ and leisurely wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites, (2) ___________________ thrill for the local residents? Villagers living in the area known as 'Old Holland' outside of Amsterdam have had enough of visitors traipsing (3) ___________________ guides with megaphones disturbing their peace. They have got together with local tour companies to create (4) ___________________ tourists. The rules include not photographing residents without permission, not strolling into their gardens (5) ___________________ litter. The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing popularity of the region. Tourism is booming and the number of tourists (6) ___________________ rise by 50 percent in the next decade.

Old Holland (7) ___________________ area that matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone age. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved, (8) ___________________ houses. Local resident Peter-Jan van Steenbergen told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is (9) ___________________ museum. He said: "I talked to one resident (10) ___________________ curtains in the morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers." He added: "The visitors seem (11) ___________________ the wooden houses to see if it is real wood. If you are the resident of that house, that is not pleasant, of course." He said the (12) ___________________ were the biggest nuisance.

Comprehension questions

  • What did the article question tourism might not be for local residents?
  • What do tour guides have that disturb locals' peace?
  • What do tourists need permission to take photos of under the new rules?
  • What did the article say was booming?
  • By when is the number of tourists expected to rise by 50%?
  • What kind of area did the article say Old Holland was?
  • What are the houses made from that the locals live in?
  • How many photographers did a resident find outside his window?
  • What do some tourists knock on?
  • What did a resident say was the biggest nuisance?

Multiple choice quiz

1) What did the article question tourism might not be for local residents? a) profitable b) a thrill c) the dream life d) touristy

2) What do tour guides have that disturb locals' peace? a) giant loud speakers b) mobile phones c) fights d) megaphones

3) What do tourists need permission to take photos of under the new rules? a) the inside of churches b) the houses c) the local residents d) windmills

4) What did the article say was booming? a) tourism b) the voices of tour guides c) a 12th-century cannon d) fireworks

5) By when is the number of tourists expected to rise by 50%? a) 2050 b) in the next decade c) 2020 d) the end of next year

6) What kind of area did the article say Old Holland was? a) idyllic b) age c) matchless d) slow

7) What are the houses made from that the locals live in? a) steel b) brick c) wood d) rocks

8) How many photographers did a resident find outside his window? a) 9 b) 8 c) 7 d) 6

9) What do some tourists knock on? a) trees b) windows c) buses d) the wooden houses

10) What did a resident say was the biggest nuisance? a) tourists breaking flowers b) rush hour c) busloads of tourists d) litter

Role A — The Pyramids

You think The Pyramids is the world's best site. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their site is not as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): the Statue of Liberty, the Amazon or Mount Fuji.

Role B — The Statue of Liberty

You think the Statue of Liberty is the world's best site. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their site is not as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): The Pyramids, the Amazon or Mount Fuji.

Role C — The Amazon

You think the Amazon is the world's best site. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their site is not as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): the Statue of Liberty, The Pyramids or Mount Fuji.

Role D — Mount Fuji

You think Mount Fuji is the world's best site. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their site is not as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): the Statue of Liberty, the Amazon or The Pyramids.

After reading / listening

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words...

'code' ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ and 'conduct' . ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________

• Share your findings with your partners.

• Make questions using the words you found.

• Ask your partner / group your questions.

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

area traditional open camera real biggest great outside peace include attempt next

Student survey

Write five GOOD questions about this topic in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper. When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

(Please look at page 12 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

Discussion - Dutch towns tell tourists how to behave

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

  • What did you think when you read the headline?
  • What springs to mind when you hear the word 'tourism'?
  • What kind of tourist are you?
  • What kind of tourism is there in your town?
  • What responsibilities do tourists have?
  • What are the bad things about tourism?
  • Why is tourism such a big industry?
  • What rules for tourists would you add?
  • What should happen to tourists who break these rules?
  • What benefits do tourists bring to a town or area?

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

  • Did you like reading this article? Why/not?
  • What do you think of when you hear the word 'tourist'?
  • What do you think about what you read?
  • What kind of bad behaviour can tourists have?
  • Should people have culture lessons before going to other countries?
  • What image do people from your country have overseas?
  • Do you like being a tourist?
  • Do you prefer solo travel or being part of a tour group?
  • Would you be a good tour guide? Why?
  • What questions would you like to ask the villagers?

Discussion — Write your own questions

(a) ________________ (b) ________________ (c) ________________ (d) ________________ (e) ________________
(f) ________________ (g) ________________ (h) ________________ (i) ________________ (j) ________________

Language — Cloze (Gap-fill)

It's great being a tourist and (1) ______ wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites, but is it such a (2) ______ for the local residents? Villagers living in the area known as 'Old Holland' outside of Amsterdam have had enough of visitors traipsing around and (3) ______ tour guides with megaphones disturbing their peace. They have got together with local tour companies to create rules of conduct for tourists. The rules include not (4) ______ residents without permission, not strolling into their gardens and not dropping (5) ______. The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing popularity of the region. Tourism is booming and the number of tourists is expected to (6) ______ by 50 percent in the next decade.

Old Holland is an (7) ______ area that matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone (8) ______. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved, traditional wooden houses. Local resident Peter-Jan van Steenbergen told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is like an open-(9) ______ museum. He said: "I talked to one resident who opened his curtains in (10) ______ morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers." He added: "The visitors seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to (11) ______ if it is real wood. If you are the resident of that house, that is not pleasant, of course." He said the busloads of tourists were the biggest (12) ______.

Which of these words go in the above text?

  • (a)     leisurely     (b)     leisure     (c)     leisured     (d)     leisureliness    
  • (a)     trill     (b)     till     (c)     thrill     (d)     thriller    
  • (a)     have     (b)     by     (c)     of     (d)     to    
  • (a)     photographed     (b)     photo     (c)     photograph     (d)     photographing    
  • (a)     litter     (b)     kittens     (c)     mittens     (d)     smitten    
  • (a)     risen     (b)     rise     (c)     arise     (d)     raise    
  • (a)     metalic     (b)     alcoholic     (c)     acrylic     (d)     idyllic    
  • (a)     old     (b)     age     (c)     history     (d)     before    
  • (a)     oxygen     (b)     wind     (c)     air     (d)     breeze    
  • (a)     a     (b)     that     (c)     one     (d)     the    
  • (a)     watch     (b)     look     (c)     view     (d)     see    
  • (a)     nuance     (b)     nuisance     (c)     nascence     (d)     nonsense

Paragraph 1

  • llueyisre wandering around old towns
  • the local esnretsdi
  • tour guides with aengmehsop
  • without emssopinri
  • the growing popularity of the iergon
  • rise by 50 per cent in the next ddeeca

Paragraph 2

  • Old Holland is an llydcii area
  • beautifully sevperrde , traditional wooden houses
  • like an open-air summue
  • nine rteaaum photographers
  • that is not natelaps
  • tourists were the biggest ianucnes

Put the text back together

(    )     thrill for the local residents? Villagers living in the area known as 'Old Holland' outside of Amsterdam have had enough

(    )     of visitors traipsing around and of tour guides with megaphones disturbing their peace. They have got together

(    )     age. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved, traditional wooden houses. Local

(    )     resident Peter-Jan van Steenbergen told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is like

(    )     seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to see if it is real wood. If you are the resident of that

(    )     with local tour companies to create rules of conduct for tourists. The rules include not

(    )     house, that is not pleasant, of course." He said the busloads of tourists were the biggest nuisance.

(  1   )     It's great being a tourist and leisurely wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites, but is it such a

(    )     litter. The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing popularity of the region. Tourism is booming and

(    )     curtains in the morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers." He added: "The visitors

(    )     the number of tourists is expected to rise by 50 per cent in the next decade.

(    )     photographing residents without permission, not strolling into their gardens and not dropping

(    )     Old Holland is an idyllic area that matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone

(    )     an open-air museum. He said: "I talked to one resident who opened his

Put the words in the right order

  • old   and   towns   leisurely   Being   wandering   a   around   tourist   .
  • megaphones   their   Tour   with   disturbing   peace   guides   .
  • photographing  not  include  rules  The  permission  without  residents  .
  • with  the  growing  popularity  of   the  region  An  attempt   to   deal   .  
  • 50   by   rise   to   expected   is  tourists   of   number  The  cent  per   .
  • preserved  Locals  ,  live   traditional   in  wooden  beautifully  houses   .
  • resident   in   who   the   opened   morning   his   One   curtains   .
  • nine  the  amateur   camera  photographers  lenses  Looked  of   into   .
  • to   the   The   happy   on   houses   seem   knock   wooden   visitors   .
  • the   nuisance   of   were   biggest   Busloads   tourists   .

Circle the correct word (20 pairs)

It's great being a tourist and leisurely / leisure wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites, but is it such a thrilling / thrill for the local residents? Villagers living in the area known / knowing as 'Old Holland' outside of Amsterdam have had enough for / of visitors traipsing around and of tour guides with / within megaphones disturbing their peace. They have got together with local / locally tour companies to create rules of conduct for tourists. The rules include not photographs / photographing residents without permission / persimmon , not strolling into their gardens and not dropping litter. The new code of conduct is an attempt to deal by / with the growing popularity of the region. Tourism is booming and the number of tourists is expected to raise / rise by 50 percent in the next decade.

Old Holland is an idyllic area that match / matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone / begin age. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved / preservative , traditional wooden houses. Local resident / residence Peter-Jan van Steenbergen told Holland's Het Parool newspaper that the village of Zaanse Schans is similar / like an open-air museum. He said: "I talked to one / once resident who opened his curtains in / on the morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers / photographs ." He added: "The visitors seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to see / view if it is real wood. If you are the resident of that house, that is not pleasant, of course." He said the busloads of tourists were the biggest nuance / nuisance .

Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

Insert the vowels (a, e, i, o, u)

_t's gr__t b__ng _ t__r_st _nd l__s_r_ly w_nd_r_ng _r__nd _ld t_wns _nd v_ll_g_s s___ng th_ s_t_s, b_t _s _t s_ch _ thr_ll f_r th_ l_c_l r_s_d_nts? V_ll_g_rs l_v_ng _n th_ _r__ kn_wn _s '_ld H_ll_nd' __ts_d_ _f _mst_rd_m h_v_ h_d _n__gh _f v_s_t_rs tr__ps_ng _r__nd _nd _f t__r g__d_s w_th m_g_ph_n_s d_st_rb_ng th__r p__c_. Th_y h_v_ g_t t_g_th_r w_th l_c_l t__r c_mp_n__s t_ cr__t_ r_l_s _f c_nd_ct f_r t__r_sts. Th_ r_l_s _ncl_d_ n_t ph_t_gr_ph_ng r_s_d_nts w_th__t p_rm_ss__n, n_t str_ll_ng _nt_ th__r g_rd_ns _nd n_t dr_pp_ng l_tt_r. Th_ n_w c_d_ _f c_nd_ct _s _n _tt_mpt t_ d__l w_th th_ gr_w_ng p_p_l_r_ty _f th_ r_g__n. T__r_sm _s b__m_ng _nd th_ n_mb_r _f t__r_sts _s _xp_ct_d t_ r_s_ by 50 p_rc_nt _n th_ n_xt d_c_d_.

_ld H_ll_nd _s _n _dyll_c _r__ th_t m_tch_s p__pl_'s _m_g_ _f D_tch l_f_ fr_m _ sl_w_r, byg_n_ _g_. Th_r_ _r_ w_ndm_lls _v_rywh_r_ _nd l_c_ls l_v_ _n b___t_f_lly pr_s_rv_d, tr_d_t__n_l w__d_n h__s_s. L_c_l r_s_d_nt P_t_r-J_n v_n St__nb_rg_n t_ld H_ll_nd's H_t P_r__l n_wsp_p_r th_t th_ v_ll_g_ _f Z__ns_ Sch_ns _s l_k_ _n _p_n-__r m_s__m. H_ s__d: "_ t_lk_d t_ _n_ r_s_d_nt wh_ _p_n_d h_s c_rt__ns _n th_ m_rn_ng _nd l__k_d _nt_ th_ c_m_r_ l_ns_s _f n_n_ _m_t__r ph_t_gr_ph_rs." H_ _dd_d: "Th_ v_s_t_rs s__m h_ppy t_ kn_ck _n th_ w__d_n h__s_s t_ s__ _f _t _s r__l w__d. _f y__ _r_ th_ r_s_d_nt _f th_t h__s_, th_t _s n_t pl__s_nt, _f c__rs_." H_ s__d th_ b_sl__ds _f t__r_sts w_r_ th_ b_gg_st n__s_nc_.

Punctuate the text and add capitals

it's great being a tourist and leisurely wandering around old towns and villages seeing the sites but is it such a thrill for the local residents villagers living in the area known as 'old holland' outside of amsterdam have had enough of visitors traipsing around and of tour guides with megaphones disturbing their peace they have got together with local tour companies to create rules of conduct for tourists the rules include not photographing residents without permission not strolling into their gardens and not dropping litter the new code of conduct is an attempt to deal with the growing popularity of the region tourism is booming and the number of tourists is expected to rise by 50 percent in the next decade

old holland is an idyllic area that matches people's image of dutch life from a slower bygone age there are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved traditional wooden houses local resident peter-jan van steenbergen told holland's het parool newspaper that the village of zaanse schans is like an open-air museum he said "i talked to one resident who opened his curtains in the morning and looked into the camera lenses of nine amateur photographers" he added "the visitors seem happy to knock on the wooden houses to see if it is real wood if you are the resident of that house that is not pleasant of course" he said the busloads of tourists were the biggest nuisance

Put a slash (/) where the spaces are

It'sgreatbeingatouristandleisurelywanderingaroundoldtownsandvill agesseeingthesites,butisitsuchathrillforthelocalresidents?Villagersli vingintheareaknownas'OldHolland'outsideofAmsterdamhavehaden oughofvisitorstraipsingaroundandoftourguideswithmegaphonesdis turbingtheirpeace.Theyhavegottogetherwithlocaltourcompaniestoc reaterulesofconductfortourists.Therulesincludenotphotographingre sidentswithoutpermission,notstrollingintotheirgardensandnotdrop pinglitter.Thenewcodeofconductisanattempttodealwiththegrowing popularityoftheregion.Tourismisboomingandthenumberoftouristsis expectedtoriseby50percentinthenextdecade.OldHollandisanidyllica reathatmatchespeople'simageofDutchlifefromaslower,bygoneage. Therearewindmillseverywhereandlocalsliveinbeautifullypreserved,t raditionalwoodenhouses.LocalresidentPeter-JanvanSteenbergent oldHolland'sHetParoolnewspaperthatthevillageofZaanseSchansislik eanopen-airmuseum.Hesaid:"Italkedtooneresidentwhoopenedhi scurtainsinthemorningandlookedintothecameralensesofnineamate urphotographers."Headded:"Thevisitorsseemhappytoknockonthew oodenhousestoseeifitisrealwood.Ifyouaretheresidentofthathouse,t hatisnotpleasant,ofcourse."Hesaidthebusloadsoftouristswerethebi ggestnuisance.

Free writing

Write about tourism for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner’s paper.

_____________________________________________________________________________

Academic writing

What are the pros and cons of tourism for a town? How should tourists behave?

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about 'Old Holland'. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. TOURISM: Make a poster about tourism. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?

4. RULES: Write a magazine article about tourists having to follow the rules of conduct in a town. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against this.

Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).

5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.

6. LETTER: Write a letter to an expert on tourism. Ask him/her three questions about it. Give him/her three of your ideas on how to boost tourism in your town. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

A Few Additional Activities for Students

Ask your students what they have read, seen or heard about this news in their own language. Students are likely to / may have have encountered this news in their L1 and therefore bring a background knowledge to the classroom.

Get students to role play different characters from this news story.

Ask students to keep track of this news and revisit it to discuss in your next class.

Ask students to male predictions of how this news might develop in the next few days or weeks, and then revisit and discuss in a future class.

Ask students to write a follow-up story to this news.

Students role play a journalist and someone who witnessed or was a part of this news. Perhaps they could make a video of the interview.

Ask students to keep a news journal in English and add this story to their thoughts.

Buy my 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers eBook. It has hundreds of ideas, activity templates, reproducible activities for:

  • Pre-reading / Post-reading
  • Using headlines
  • Working with words
  • While-reading / While-listening
  • Moving from text to speech
  • Post-reading / Post-listening
  • Discussions
  • Using opinions
  • Using lists
  • Using quotes
  • Task-based activities
  • Using the central characters in the article
  • Using themes from the news

Buy my book

(Please look at page 26 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

Back to the top

Help Support This Web Site

  • Please consider helping Breaking News English.com

Sean Banville's Book

  • Download a sample of my book "1,000 Ideas & Activities for Language Teachers".

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser or activate Google Chrome Frame to improve your experience.

FluentU Logo

English Tourism Vocabulary and Exercises for Any Traveler

People who work in the travel industry around the world generally use English as a common language to communicate with international tourists.

Because there are so many jobs in tourism, there are many different types of tourism English . 

In this guide, I’ll show you some of the most useful vocabulary you’ll need to know for the tourism industry, so that you’ll be prepared for a range of situations!

Basic Vocabulary to Get You Started

Phrases to check for understanding, to double-check what you heard, to ask for clarification, to invite your guests to ask questions, common scenarios in tourism english, giving recommendations, providing directions and describing places, using simple “ice breakers” to make friendly small talk, exercises to improve your tourism vocabulary, and one more thing....

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Here’s a list of common tourism-related English words. You might be asked questions with these words, or you might need to use them yourself. Make sure you’re familiar with them and can use them in full sentences.

  • Attractions — places for tourists to see
  • Business district — also called the financial district, this is the center of the city where most offices are located
  • Entertainment district  — an area that has lots of clubs, bars, theaters, etc.
  • Dining district  — an area with a lot of restaurants
  • Custom — something that people do as part of their culture
  • Highlight — best part (of something) or an important part of an event or period of time
  • Scenery  — the setting for a place, natural beauty that you see around a place
  • Surroundings  — all of the things around you
  • Depart  — leave, take off
  • Arrive  — come to a place, reach a destination
  • Recommend  — give advice, suggest
  • Sit back and relax  — a common phrase to tell people to have a good time

If you work in the tourism industry, you probably have experience with miscommunication.

As a guide, host or receptionist, it’s your job to make sure that you’re double-checking for understanding. These phrases are simple and quick ways to make sure you and your guest are on the same page.

  • I heard you ask (about flights). Is that correct?
  • So, you said (you wanted to visit the ruins), right?
  • Okay, I understand that (your flight leaves at 3 PM). Is that correct?

FluentU takes authentic videos—like music videos, movie trailers, news and inspiring talks—and turns them into personalized language learning lessons.

You can try FluentU for free for 2 weeks. Check out the website or download the iOS app or Android app.

P.S. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

FluentU Ad

Try FluentU for FREE!

Even though you’re both speaking English, your guest may use vocabulary that you’re unfamiliar with. Likewise, they might have an accent that’s difficult for you to understand. Here are some polite ways to ask them to repeat or clarify what they said.

  • I’m sorry, I didn’t quite understand that. Can you say that again?
  • Pardon my English, but I didn’t quite understand that. Can you say that again?
  • I’m sorry, but I didn’t catch that. Can you describe what you mean?

Some cultures encourage people to be outspoken, while those from other parts of the world prefer people to act in a more reserved manner. Make all of your guests feel welcome by encouraging them to ask questions.

  • Does anyone have any questions?
  • Yes, sir / ma’am? Do you have a question?
  • Please feel free to raise your hand any time if you have a question.
  • So, any questions?

Depending on your job, you’ll probably be required to give directions to tourists, provide them with recommendations for a good restaurant or attraction and in general make friendly conversation that makes them feel welcome.

In these scenarios, you’ll play the part of the “guide,” but it could really be anyone a tourist might come in contact with. Practice these dialogues so that you feel confident using these words and phrases in your interactions.

  • For (authentic cuisine, family activities, etc), I recommend…
  • My favorite place is…
  • Personally, I suggest…

Tourist: Excuse me, do you know a good place for ice cream?

Guide: Oh, yes. For really good ice cream, I recommend “Maria’s.” It’s located about six blocks from here, and it’s my favorite place. Personally, I suggest the chocolate cherry flavor, but they’re famous for their award-winning lemon flavor. I think your family will like it.

Tourist: Great, thanks!

  • Go straight
  • Stop at the…
  • Continue until…
  • Take the (subway, bus, etc.)
  • Follow the signs for…

Points of reference

  • At the traffic light
  • At the next (street, light, block, etc.)
  • In (five) blocks
  • Near the (hotel, beach, station, etc.)
  • On the main plaza

Tourist: Can you tell me how to get to the theater?

Guide: Sure! The theater is near the train station. You need to go straight down this street for one block. At the next street, turn left. Continue until you see a sign for the theater, in about five blocks. If you’re lost, you can follow the signs for the train station. Does that make sense?

Tourist: Yes, thank you!

Here’s a helpful video  to practice basic phrases for giving directions.

Here are some phrases that you can use when you want to get to know the tourists a little bit better.

  • So, are you enjoying your time in (Paris) so far?
  • Tell me, what is your favorite part of the city so far?
  • I’m curious, do you think this city seems friendly?
  • Tell me, what do you think of the (architecture, food, beach, festival, etc.)?

Each chapter is filled with  different tourism-related scenarios that you’re likely to encounter . The series is designed like a language course to steadily grow your skills. Try to find half an hour every day to read a chapter and complete the associated exercises.

  • Follow English Speakers on X (Twitter). More specifically, follow English speakers who work in the travel industry. This will help you naturally absorb English tourism vocabulary, plus today’s big topics in the world of travel.

@TravelEditor :  Full of great travel advice and destination information. She also likes to tweet travel questions and talk with her followers.

@Just1WayTicket :  Want some ideas of where to go next? Check out beautiful pictures and helpful information posted on this account.

@GettingStamped :  Great profile for learning about popular tourist destinations, as well as what tourists like to do while traveling abroad.

And remember, if you really want to  use Twitter to sharpen your English skills , you need to do more than just read tweets.  Engage in discussions as well!  Not only will that make using Twitter more fun, but it’ll also require you to learn and use new words during your chats back and forth with others.

/r/Travel :  Reddit has always been a great place for English language learners to  practice their written English with people all over the world . The travel  sub (Reddit slang for “forum”) is a great place to talk about everything related to tourism. Think of it as more like chatting about tourism rather than answering specific questions.

If you’re a hospitality professional, you’ll want to check out Oxford University Press’  free   online workbook series,  English for Careers . There, you’ll see English for Tourism exercises divided up into three different skill levels, along with various other careers.

Try spending as little as 30 minutes a day using Memrise to brush up on your tourism vocabulary—you’ll notice a difference!

Soon you’ll be able to communicate with any tourist who crosses your path!

If you like learning English through movies and online media, you should also check out FluentU. FluentU lets you learn English from popular talk shows, catchy music videos and funny commercials , as you can see here:

learn-english-with-videos

If you want to watch it, the FluentU app has probably got it.

The FluentU app and website makes it really easy to watch English videos. There are captions that are interactive. That means you can tap on any word to see an image, definition, and useful examples.

learn-english-with-subtitled-television-show-clips

FluentU lets you learn engaging content with world famous celebrities.

For example, when you tap on the word "searching," you see this:

learn-conversational-english-with-interactive-captioned-dialogue

FluentU lets you tap to look up any word.

Learn all the vocabulary in any video with quizzes. Swipe left or right to see more examples for the word you’re learning.

practice-english-with-adaptive-quizzes

FluentU helps you learn fast with useful questions and multiple examples. Learn more.

The best part? FluentU remembers the vocabulary that you’re learning. It gives you extra practice with difficult words—and reminds you when it’s time to review what you’ve learned. You have a truly personalized experience.

Start using the FluentU website on your computer or tablet or, better yet, download the FluentU app from the iTunes or Google Play store. Click here to take advantage of our current sale! (Expires at the end of this month.)

Enter your e-mail address to get your free PDF!

We hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe

tourism esl class

Jump to navigation

Resources and Programs

  • Teaching the Four Skills
  • U.S. Culture, Music & Games
  • Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
  • Other Resources
  • English Club Texts and Materials
  • Teacher's Corner
  • Comics for Language Learning
  • Online Professional English Network (OPEN)

tourism esl class

This month’s Teacher’s Corner explores the world of travel and tourism. Specifically, each week covers travel-related topics that students can use to practice speaking, reading, and listening.

For many English learners, traveling the world is one of the many reasons they study English. No matter where you travel, it is easy to find a speaker of English to help you on your journey. However, as every good traveler knows, it is best to be prepared. This month’s Teacher’s Corner is devoted to giving students the chance to practice and prepare their English for the world of travel.

The activities this month are designed to give students the opportunity to creatively practice their English while thinking about travel both at home and abroad:

  • Week 1 – Around the World
  • Week 2 – What to See in Town
  • Week 3 – Planning a Trip
  • Week 4 – Over-tourism

Week 1 begins the month with a Pecha Kucha style presentation. In these fast-paced presentations, students must describe an around-the-world trip in three minutes using only six presentation slides. In Week 2, students practice common phrasal verbs used in travel and tourism. In Week 3, students describe the tourist attractions in their home countries by preparing a six-day trip for a new visitor. Finally, this month’s Teacher’s Corner concludes with a debate activity focused on the increasing concern of over-tourism.

tourism esl class

Table of Contents

In this week’s Teacher’s Corner, students are tasked with creating a Pecha Kucha presentation on an around-the-world trip. Pecha Kucha is a presentation style where each presenter is allowed twenty slides which are shown for twenty seconds each. The goal is to encourage the speaker to be concise – to not talk too long. For this activity, students will get six slides shown for thirty seconds each, with each slide showcasing a place they would like to visit on a trip around the world.

Intermediate to Advanced

LANGUAGE FOCUS

Speaking, reading (primary focus) Listening (secondary focus)

Students will practice speaking, reading, and listening through

  • Researching locations they would like to visit on a trip around the world
  • Delivering a three-minute presentation about their around-the-world trip
  • Teacher: computer, projector, stopwatch or other timing device, a map
  • Students: notebook, pencil, paper, computers (for research to be done as homework, or books and encyclopedias)

PREPARATION

  • Read through all the materials carefully.
  • For this activity, students will be giving presentations to the class. To save time, be sure that students submit their presentations as a homework assignment before the day they will present them. The teacher should then have all the presentations loaded onto the class computer, ready to go at the start of the class. Having the presentations already loaded will save time, compared to each student separately loading his or her presentation on the computer. Having the presentations ready to go at the start of class will save time, compared to each student separately loading his or her presentation on the computer. If a computer is not available, this can be done on sheets of large paper as well.
  • During this activity, students will be giving presentations that have a set time limit of three minutes. To keep students on time, the teacher controls when the slides of the presentation change. Optionally, a student can be selected as the official timekeeper. This student can sit at the presentation computer to advance the slides instead of the teacher.

PART ONE: PREPARING TO DEPART

  • Begin the class by showing a map of the world. To warm students up for the activity, ask students to come to the board and point to countries that you name.
  • If none of the students know the meaning of the word, give them a clue. For example, point to the United States and tell the students, “The United States is a country.” Next, point to Mexico and tell the students, “Mexico is a country, too.” Finally, point to Canada and say, “Canada is also a country.” Then tell the students, “The United States, Mexico, and Canada are all on the same continent.” While speaking, use your finger to draw a large circle around the North American continent. (Don’t forget to include Central America too!)
  • To check the students’ comprehension of the word continent ask the class, “How many continents are there in the world?” Students should respond with “seven”; if they answer “six,” they may have forgotten about Antarctica!
  • Ask the students which continent they most want to visit and why. Tell the students to think about their answers.
  • Next, have the students form pairs and share their answers with their partners.
  • Finally, have students share their answers with the entire class.
  • Inform the class that for homework they are going to plan an around-the-world trip.
  • Explain to the students that they will prepare a presentation to show the class about their around-the-world trip.
  • Instruct the students that their one location per continent must be a city, national park, or sightseeing location. An entire country is too large to select as one location!
  • Students must travel in one direction around the world (either east or west).
  • Each slide should have some basic information about the location and at least one picture of the location.
  • Finally, inform the students that they will only have three minutes to give their presentation to the class, and each slide will only be shown for thirty seconds. So, students should practice their presentations before class!

PART TWO: CLASS PRESENTATIONS

  • On the day students give their class presentations, remind them they only have thirty seconds for each slide. If time permits, give the students a few minutes to check their notes and prepare for their presentations.
  • Have the first student presenting come to the front of the class.
  • Open the student’s presentation and start the timer. After thirty seconds move to the next slide; after another thirty seconds move to the third slide; and so on.
  • Optional: After all the students have presented their around-the-world trip, have the class vote on the most interesting trip!

This week’s Teacher’s Corner provides students with the opportunity to practice using phrasal verbs in an activity about New York City.

Reading, speaking (primary focus) Listening (secondary focus)

During this activity, students will

  • Practice speaking skills through a matching activity
  • Practice reading skills and using travel-related phrasal verbs in a worksheet activity
  • Teacher: whiteboard or chalkboard, markers or chalk
  • Students: pencils or pens, notebooks or writing paper
  • Print out copies of the phrasal verb cards in Appendix 1. a. Students will use the phrasal verb cards in a pair-work activity. Print enough copies of the phrasal verb cards for each pair of students to have a set.
  • Cut out the phrasal verb cards and for each set, mix the cards so that the phrasal verbs and definitions are mixed well.
  • Print out copies of the phrasal verbs fill-in-the-blank worksheet in Appendix 2. Students will use the worksheet in a pair-work activity. Print enough copies of the worksheet for each pair of students to have one. The answer key is in Appendix 3.

ACTIVITY PART ONE: PHRASAL VERB WARM-UP

  • Begin the class by having the students form pairs. 
  • Give each pair a set of phrasal verb cards (already mixed up) from Appendix 1.
  • Have the students work together to match each phrasal verb to its correct definition.
  • After the students have completed the matching activity, review the answers as a class.
  • Next, ask the students, “What do the phrasal verbs have in common?” a. Answer: Each of the phrasal verbs is related to travel.
  • Next, ask the students, “What is the one city in the world you would like to visit?” a. Optional: Ask the students this question as part of a Think, Pair, Share activity.     i. First, have the students think about their answer individually.     ii. Next, have the students share their answer with their partner.     iii. Finally, encourage the students to share their answer or, even better, to share their partners’ answers with the class.

ACTIVITY PART TWO: PHRASAL VERB WORKSHEET

  • Begin this part of the activity by asking the students if they would like to visit New York City.
  • Next, ask why they would like to visit the city, or ask what they would like to do if they visited the city.
  • As students answer the questions, pass out the phrasal verb fill-in-the-blank worksheet to the pairs of students. Instruct them to read through the worksheet and circle any vocabulary they don’t know. a. If students have questions about vocabulary, take a few moments to answer their questions before moving on to Step 4.
  • Next, have the pairs of students fill in the blanks on the worksheet with the phrasal verbs on the cards they used in Part 1 of this activity. As students work, walk around the room to check on their progress.
  • Once the pairs have finished filling in the blanks, check their answers as a class.

APPENDIX 1: PHRASAL VERBS MATCHING CARDS

week2_chart.png

tourism esl class

APPENDIX 2: PHRASAL VERBS FILL-IN-THE-BLANK WORKSHEET

appenx2_3.jpg

tourism esl class

New York has been called “The City That Never Sleeps!” With so many things to do at any time of day, New York is a great place to visit on vacation. Thanks to New York’s many transportation options, you don’t need anyone to __________ you __________ at the airport. Instead, you can take a bus or the subway into the city, or even have one of the city’s famous yellow taxis __________ you _________ at your hotel. After you ___________________ to your hotel, you can ____________________ on your NYC adventure!

If it is your first visit to New York, be sure to take some time to ____________________ the city by taking a walk. It can be a great way to get to know the city and experience the New York way of life. Some of the best things about New York can be found by ___________________ the many diverse neighborhoods full of great food, interesting events, and historical landmarks. Even though New York is famous for its busy streets, you can ___________________ from the crowds by visiting Central Park. There you can walk through the trees, sit by the lake, and even get a famous New York City hot dog.

Of course, no trip to New York would be complete without visiting the Statue of Liberty. To visit, you need to ____________________ a ferry at Battery Park. While crossing the water, you can ____________________ a wonderful view of the city. Once on Liberty Island, you can walk around the statue, visit the museum, or climb the 377 steps to the top of the Statue of Liberty. It is an incredible experience, but tickets sell out quickly!

As you leave New York and your plane ____________________, be sure to enjoy the view out the window to get one last look at the city that never sleeps!

APPENDIX 3: PHRASAL VERBS FILL-IN-THE-BLANK ANSWER KEY

New York has been called “The City That Never Sleeps”! With so many things to do at any time of day, New York is a great place to visit on vacation. Thanks to New York’s many transportation options, you don’t need anyone to ____pick you up_____ at the airport. Instead, you can take a bus or subway into the city, or even have one of the city’s famous yellow taxis ______drop you off________ at your hotel. After you _____check in________ to your hotel, you can ____set out_________ on your NYC adventure!

If it is your first visit to New York, be sure to take some time to __look around____ the city by taking a walk. It can be a great way to get to know the city and experience the New York way of life. Some of the best things about New York can be found by __checking out___ the many diverse neighborhoods full of great food, interesting events, and historical landmarks. Even though New York is famous for its busy streets, you can ___get away_________ from the crowds by visiting Central Park. There you can walk through the trees, sit by the lake, and even get a famous New York City hot dog.

Of course, no trip to New York would be complete without visiting the Statue of Liberty. To visit, you need to ____get on__________ a ferry at Battery Park. While crossing the water, you can _____take in________ a wonderful view of the city. Once on Liberty Island, you can walk around the statue, visit the museum, or climb the 377 steps to the top of the Statue of Liberty. It is an incredible experience, but tickets sell out quickly!

As you leave New York and your plane ___takes off________, be sure to enjoy the view out the window to get one last look at the city that never sleeps!

This month’s Teacher’s Corner explores travel and tourism. This week’s activity asks students to think about their own cities or countries by designing a six-day trip for a visiting tourist.

LEVEL Intermediate to Advanced

FOCUS Reading, writing (primary focus) Speaking, listening (secondary focus)

GOALS During this activity students will

  • Practice speaking skills while creating a travel plan for their country or city
  • Practice presentations skills while delivering their travel plans to the class
  • Teacher: whiteboard or chalkboard, markers or chalk, poster paper (optional)

In this activity, students will prepare a travel plan for someone visiting their country or city for the first time. This activity can take place during one class period or across two classes depending on how much time your students need to prepare their travel plans.

  • Print out copies of Appendix 1 Travel Plans. Print enough copies so that each group of two to three students has one to complete.

ACTIVITY PART ONE: HOMEWORK – TRAVEL PLANNING

  • Begin this activity by having the students form groups of two to three students.
  • Give each group a copy of the Travel Plan from Appendix
  • Have the students work together to brainstorm a six-day travel plan to their country. a. If your students are from a large city, they could plan the entire six-day trip just in their city. If your students are from a smaller city or more rural area, they can plan a regional or nation-wide trip.
  • As the groups work, walk around the room asking groups for details about their trip. Encourage them to be as specific as possible. For example: if they write “stay in a hotel,” instruct them to be more specific: What hotel? Where in the city? What makes that hotel or area of the city interesting?
  • Optional: Depending on time and student levels, this activity can also be a homework assignment. After the groups have finished their travel plans, the homework can challenge the students to use the travel plans to create a poster, a flyer, or even a video where students can show off their six-day travel plans.

ACTIVITY PART TWO: TRAVEL SHOWCASE

  • After the groups have finished their travel plans, give them time to prepare a speaking presentation to the class. a. Instruct the students that for the presentation each student in the group must speak. For example, in a group of three students, each student can present on two days of the trip. b.  Note: Depending on students’ level and ability, this presentation part of the activity can be done on a separate day to give the students more time to prepare.
  • Next, have each group come to the front of the class and describe the travel plan they made to the rest of the class. a. For additional speaking practice, encourage the rest of the class to ask questions about the trip.
  • After each group has presented their travel plan, have the class vote on the presentations. Which travel plan was the best? Which was the most adventurous? Which was the most historic?

APPENDIX 1: TRAVEL PLANS

Directions: Plan a six-day trip to your country for a person who has never visited before. Choose a city, region, or the entire country. Include everything, such as what to visit, where to stay, and what to eat!

This month’s Teacher’s Corner explores the world of travel and tourism. With travel becoming easier and cheaper all around the world, people who live in popular tourist locations have begun to ask if too much tourism can be a problem. In this week’s activity, students will debate the positives and negatives of tourism.

Speaking, listening (primary focus)

Reading, writing (secondary focus)

  • Practice reading skills while reading an article about over-tourism
  • Practice speaking and listening during a debate on tourism
  • Teacher: whiteboard or chalkboard, markers or chalk, a timing device, Internet (optional)
  • Before class, read the article " Too Much Tourism "and listen to the audio version of the story.
  • Print out copies of Appendix 1: “Too Much Tourism” article. Print enough copies so that each student has one. Note: If a computer lab is an option for your class, have the students read the article by visiting this URL: https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/too-much-tourism/4118421.html
  • On the website, the article has an audio version that can be streamed over the Internet or downloaded and played on a computer in class.

ACTIVITY PART ONE: "TOO MUCH TOURISM" ARTICLE

  • Direct students' attention to the board.
  • On the board write the word tourism . Ask the students what the word tourism means.
  • Next, as a check of their understanding, ask the class where in their country is popular for tourism?
  • Then, write the word over in front of the word tourism to create the new word over-tourism.
  • Again ask the students to provide a definition for this word. a.    Note: Over-tourism is a recent issue that has gained attention in the news and travel industry. It does not have an exact definition, but as long as students describe a problem of too many visitors to a place, their definition is acceptable.
  • Once again, check the students’ understanding by asking if there are any locations in their country that they think face problems with over-tourism. a.    Note: Depending on the level of the students, this question can be asked as a Think, Pair, Share. First have the students think about the question, then have them share their answers with a partner, finally have the pairs of students share their answers with the class.
  • Next, provide each student with a copy of the “Too Much Tourism” article in Appendix 1. Give students time to read the article. a.    Note: To provide students more listening practice, have them listen to the article by playing the audio version of the story from the webpage.
  • To check their comprehension, ask the following questions: a.    How many trips are tourists expected to take by the year 2030? (Answer: 1.8 billion) b.    What is Croatia doing to help stop over-tourism? (Answer: Limiting the number of daily visitors to the city of Dubrovnik.)
  • Finally, as a show of hands, ask the students who thinks limiting tourism is a good idea? Tell the class they will have the opportunity to share their opinions in a debate. 

ACTIVITY PART TWO: THE TOURISM DEBATE

  • Note:  For this debate, students will argue for and against tourism. If you teach a large class, you may want to break students into groups and then have these groups form two teams that can debate. Another option for larger classes is for students to volunteer to participate in the debate, while the rest of the class can act as audience and decide which team won.
  • Begin the debate by dividing the class (or a group of students) into two teams. Decide which team will be the For side, which will argue in favor of the topic, and which will be the Against side, which will argue against the theme of the topic.
  • While the students are forming For and Against teams, go to the chalkboard and write the theme and topics for the debate: Debate Theme: Tourism  Topic #1: Whether tourism is always good for the local economy, and the economy is more important than too many tourists. Topic #2: Whether too much tourism can harm the local culture of a city. Topic #3: Whether people should travel less. a.     Note:  If time permits have the students debate all three topics. For large classes, students can take turns debating: one group of students debates one topic, then the next group of students debates the next topic, and so on.
  • Direct the students’ attention to the three debate topics that you have written on the board and tell the students they should prepare their ideas on these topics for the debate. a.     Note: For more advanced lessons, assign the debate preparation as homework so students can research the topics and prepare with more details.
  • Once the students are prepared, have the students who are going to debate first come to the front of the class. Have the two teams form lines on opposite ends of the board. Begin the debate by having the first student in line of the For team present his or her argument for one minute. Then the first student from the Against team has one minute to challenge the ideas presented by the For team’s student.
  • After the first students from each team have spoken for a minute, have them move to the back of the line and have the second student in each line more forward. They will now debate against each other. This time the Against student goes first for one minute. The student for the For team then gets to present his or her argument on the topic. Continue until all students have had the opportunity to debate.

Remember:  An effective debate is not only about presenting an argument but also challenging the argument of one’s opponent. For more information on debates and ideas for using debates in class, check out The Great Mini-Debate on the American English webpage.

APPENDIX 1: TOO MUCH TOURISM?

  • Privacy Notice
  • Copyright Info
  • Accessibility Statement
  • Get Adobe Reader

For English Language Teachers Around the World

The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State, manages this site. External links to other Internet sites should not be construed as an endorsement of the views or privacy policies contained therein.

logo for Englishcurrent.com, an ESL website

English Current

ESL Lesson Plans, Tests, & Ideas

  • North American Idioms
  • Business Idioms
  • Idioms Quiz
  • Idiom Requests
  • Proverbs Quiz & List
  • Phrasal Verbs Quiz
  • Basic Phrasal Verbs
  • North American Idioms App
  • A(n)/The: Help Understanding Articles
  • The First & Second Conditional
  • The Difference between 'So' & 'Too'
  • The Difference between 'a few/few/a little/little'
  • The Difference between "Other" & "Another"
  • Check Your Level
  • English Vocabulary
  • Verb Tenses (Intermediate)
  • Articles (A, An, The) Exercises
  • Prepositions Exercises
  • Irregular Verb Exercises
  • Gerunds & Infinitives Exercises
  • Discussion Questions
  • Speech Topics
  • Argumentative Essay Topics
  • Top-rated Lessons
  • Intermediate
  • Upper-Intermediate
  • Reading Lessons
  • View Topic List
  • Expressions for Everyday Situations
  • Travel Agency Activity
  • Present Progressive with Mr. Bean
  • Work-related Idioms
  • Adjectives to Describe Employees
  • Writing for Tone, Tact, and Diplomacy
  • Speaking Tactfully
  • Advice on Monetizing an ESL Website
  • Teaching your First Conversation Class
  • How to Teach English Conversation
  • Teaching Different Levels
  • Teaching Grammar in Conversation Class
  • Members' Home
  • Update Billing Info.
  • Cancel Subscription
  • North American Proverbs Quiz & List
  • North American Idioms Quiz
  • Idioms App (Android)
  • 'Be used to'" / 'Use to' / 'Get used to'
  • Ergative Verbs and the Passive Voice
  • Keywords & Verb Tense Exercises
  • Irregular Verb List & Exercises
  • Non-Progressive (State) Verbs
  • Present Perfect vs. Past Simple
  • Present Simple vs. Present Progressive
  • Past Perfect vs. Past Simple
  • Subject Verb Agreement
  • The Passive Voice
  • Subject & Object Relative Pronouns
  • Relative Pronouns Where/When/Whose
  • Commas in Adjective Clauses
  • A/An and Word Sounds
  • 'The' with Names of Places
  • Understanding English Articles
  • Article Exercises (All Levels)
  • Yes/No Questions
  • Wh-Questions
  • How far vs. How long
  • Affect vs. Effect
  • A few vs. few / a little vs. little
  • Boring vs. Bored
  • Compliment vs. Complement
  • Die vs. Dead vs. Death
  • Expect vs. Suspect
  • Experiences vs. Experience
  • Go home vs. Go to home
  • Had better vs. have to/must
  • Have to vs. Have got to
  • I.e. vs. E.g.
  • In accordance with vs. According to
  • Lay vs. Lie
  • Make vs. Do
  • In the meantime vs. Meanwhile
  • Need vs. Require
  • Notice vs. Note
  • 'Other' vs 'Another'
  • Pain vs. Painful vs. In Pain
  • Raise vs. Rise
  • So vs. Such
  • So vs. So that
  • Some vs. Some of / Most vs. Most of
  • Sometimes vs. Sometime
  • Too vs. Either vs. Neither
  • Weary vs. Wary
  • Who vs. Whom
  • While vs. During
  • While vs. When
  • Wish vs. Hope
  • 10 Common Writing Mistakes
  • 34 Common English Mistakes
  • First & Second Conditionals
  • Comparative & Superlative Adjectives
  • Determiners: This/That/These/Those
  • Check Your English Level
  • Grammar Quiz (Advanced)
  • Vocabulary Test - Multiple Questions
  • Vocabulary Quiz - Choose the Word
  • Verb Tense Review (Intermediate)
  • Verb Tense Exercises (All Levels)
  • Conjunction Exercises
  • List of Topics
  • Business English
  • Games for the ESL Classroom
  • Pronunciation
  • Teaching Your First Conversation Class
  • How to Teach English Conversation Class

Travel & Tourist Destinations (Advanced ESL Lesson Plan)

Download the Travel & Tourism ESL lesson plan here: Travel-Tourism-ESL-Advanced-21052012.doc

Note : This plan is  out of date . An  updated (2022) travel lesson plan for advanced students can be found here .

Travel Lesson Plan (ESL): Advanced

A lesson plan on travel

Travel Lesson Plan (ESL): Warm-up (Pair Work)

1) Where are you planning to go for your next holiday? 2) Is there a place you'd never visit again? Where and why? 3) Do you prefer traveling independently or with a group on an organized tour? 4) What do you know of the following countries: Uganda, Myanmar, Ukraine, and Jordan?

Travel: The Top Four of Lonely Planet's “Countries To Visit in 2012” List

Membership is required to view this post . Please support EnglishCurrent by becoming a member today. Members, please log-in .

10 comments on “ Travel & Tourist Destinations (Advanced ESL Lesson Plan) ”

This is a good one for an international school. I love this site. What a find. Thanks a ton

great lesson, thanks

Very uselful lesson to keep students engaged in classrooms.

Very interesting, clear and straightforward! I know my students will respond. Thank you so much!

I love the unconventional take on topics included here as well as the range of lessons for advanced learners. It is so hard to find lessons for this level. I’ll be donating to support your free service! Thanks from a grateful teacher!

Thank you so very much!

Thank you so much. It will nbe pleasure for my students.

Pingback: Top Four Countries to Visit & Travel Trends (Advanced Travel Lesson Plan)

Pingback: Top Travel Destinations & Trends (Upper-Intermediate EFL Lesson)

Pingback: Top Tourist Destinations & Travel Trends (Intermediate EFL Lesson)

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Terrific Travel and Tourism Language and Vocabulary Lessons

1 talking about travel and culture speaking lesson.

This is an ESL speaking and writing lesson for practicing basic language for talking about travel and culture. First, students complete the sentences with the vocabulary at the bottom of the page. Then they give their own opinions about what they like and dislike about traveling. 

tourism esl class

Travel and culture vocabulary (PDF)

Subscribe to Eslflow

Subscribe to get full access to complete (not just extracts) lessons with picture/vocabulary exercises and answers. Many lessons include and audio and video. There are no ads in the newsletter and you will receive high quality, and up-to-date teaching resources regularly.  And, if you subscribe, you will get access to ideas for creating artificial intelligence prompts , that will enable you to create English language teaching materials quickly! In addition, you will get access to the complete sets of exercises, with a wider variety of exercises and activities. Also, if you take out a paid subscription, you can download large collections of PDF, audio and video materials in zip files.

2 Tourism & travel ranking/rating vocabulary and discussion lesson (with answers) 

This is an ESL speaking for discussing travel. Students match the vocabulary to the pictures. Then they rank their preferences for the various types of travel experience. Finally, they discuss their preferences.

Travel activity picture -vocabulary matching and ranking exercise for ESL and English language students.

Rating different kinds of travel (PDF)

3 Brainstorming the pros/cons of traveling alone or traveling in groups

This is an exercise for discussing the advantages/disadvantages of traveling alone or traveling in groups . Students look at the pictures and then try to write down their ideas. Then, on the third page of the PDF, they can organize their ideas for a discussion or an essay.

Travel alone or in groups (PDF)

Related Resources for the Hospitality Industry

5 Complaints and Annoyances Speaking and Language Exercises

Food, Restaurants and Cooking Home

10 Food, Eating and Restaurant Vocabulary and Speaking Exercises

8  Hotel Vocabulary and Speaking Skills Exercises

5  Airport and Airline Vocabulary and Language Skills Exercises with Answers

5 Intercultural Communication Language Exercises and Worksheets

5 Cool Advertising & Branding Vocabulary & Language Exercises

Related Cultural Resources:

Celebrations and festivals lesson

Body language and gestures vocabulary exercises

US vs UK vocabulary

Tourism home

4 Speaking skills worksheet: travel situations (with answers)

This is an English language exercise exploring language commonly used in various traveling situations.  Students try to imagine what is being said in each situation and fill in the speech bubbles. Then listen to the audio.

tourism esl class

Travel situations speaking skills (PDF)

5 Tourism & travel survey and speaking lesson

This is an ESL speaking and writing lesson for giving opinions about tourism and travel. First, students write five survey questions about advertising. There are some examples of questions at the top of the first page of the PDF.  When they have written five questions, they can walk around the class asking classmates their questions and noting down their answers on the worksheet. Finally, they write a short report from their survey question answers. This is a fun communicative exercise that allows students to mix freely.

tourism esl class

Tourism/travel classroom survey (PDF)

tourism esl class

2 Replies to “Travel and tourism language and vocabulary lessons”

I am looking for a TESOL Lesson plan for Speaking skills, on ‘A trip to any holiday destination’. Which includes an audio clip and related worksheets. Thanks .

Oh! If I have time.. I really want to do audio clips for these worksheets.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

RECENT ESL EXERCISES

  • Essential listening exercises for ESL classes
  • Daily routines and schedules
  • Sentence starters
  • Writing topic sentences
  • Shopping online listening, speaking and vocabulary
  • Import/export, logistics and supply chain exercises
  • Create a conversation
  • Using comparative adjectives
  • Gerunds and Infinitives Grammar, Speaking and Listening Activities

tourism esl class

Overtourism

"Take only memories, leave only footprints." Chief Seattle (1786 – 1866), Native American chief
  • January 17, 2022
  • General English
  • No Comments

Home » Overtourism

Latest lesson plans

The Circular Economy

This free ESL lesson plan on overtourism has been designed for adults and young adults at an intermediate (B1/B2) to advanced (C1/C2) level and should last around 45 to 60 minutes for one student.

As nations become wealthier, their people travel more. Once the preserve of the middle class from Western nations, today, as the global middle class has massively expanded in populous countries like China, Brazil and India, tourism has also experienced an explosion. While this has been great for local economies, and obviously great for the people who get to experience the world, it has not been without its negative consequences. Housing prices have rocketed in tourist hotspots, forcing locals out of the places they call home. Ancient sites of historical importance find themselves with irreparable damages. And who can ignore the impact on the environment this boom in travel is responsible for? In this ESL lesson plan on overtourism, students will have the opportunity to discuss and express their opinions on issues such as the causes, consequences and solutions to excessive tourism.

This lesson plan could also be used with your students to debate these issues for World Tourism Day , which takes place in September. For more lesson plans on international days and important holidays, see the  calendar of world days  to plan your classes for these special occasions.

For advice on how to use this English lesson plan and  other lesson plans  on this site, see the  guide for ESL teachers .

PRE-CLASS ACTIVITIES

Reading activity Before the English class, send the following article to the students and ask them to read it while making a list of any new vocabulary or phrases they find (explain any the students don’t understand in the class):

Nomadic Matt | Overtourism: How You Can Help Solve This Worldwide Problem

In this blog post, Nomadic Matt explains some of the causes of overtourism and what tourists can do to avoid contributing to this problem whilst still enjoying their trips. Advice includes visiting areas other than the most popular ones, eating away from the tourist areas, and being environmentally friendly. At the start of the class, hold a brief discussion about what the students thought about the article. What do they think about the issues raised in the article? Do they agree with what was said? Can they think of any ways they might disagree with the content of the article?

Video activity To save time in class for the conversation activities, the English teacher can ask the students to watch the video below and answer the listening questions in Section 3 of the lesson plan at home. The questions for the video are styled in a way similar to an exam like the IELTS.

The video for this class is called “Too Many People Want to Travel” by The Atlantic which looks at the reasons why so many more people are travelling today, and what the negative consequences of this boom in tourism has brought.

IN-CLASS ACTIVITIES

The focus in the class is on conversation in order to help improve students’ fluency and confidence when speaking in English as well as boosting their vocabulary.

This lesson opens with a short discussion about the article the students read before the class. Next, the students can give their opinion on the quote at the beginning of the lesson plan – what they think the quote means and if they agree with it. This is followed by an initial discussion on the topic including the reasons more people are travelling today, how to escape the crowds, and which places are suffering because of overtourism.

After this, students will learn some vocabulary connected with overtourism such as cruise , package holiday and throng . This vocabulary has been chosen to boost the students’ knowledge of less common vocabulary that could be useful for preparing for English exams like IELTS or TOEFL. The vocabulary is accompanied by a cloze activity and a speaking activity to test the students’ comprehension of these words.

If the students didn’t watch the video before the class, they can watch it after the vocabulary section and answer the listening questions. Before checking the answers, ask the students to give a brief summary of the video and what they thought about the content.

Finally, there is a more in-depth conversation about overtourism. In this speaking activity, students will talk about issues such as the effect of overtourism on house prices, whether tourist numbers should be restricted, and whether it’s hypocritical for tourists and locals to complain about overtourism.

After the class, students will write about their opinion of overtourism. This could be a short paragraph or a longer piece of writing depending on what level the student is at. The writing activity is designed to allow students to practise and improve their grammar with the feedback from their teacher. For students who intend to take an international English exam such as IELTS or TOEFL, there is an alternative essay question to practise their essay-writing skills.

DOWNLOAD LESSON PLANS

tourism esl class

Did you find this lesson plan useful?

Your English Pal is a free resource to help fellow ESL teachers save time when preparing their classes. If these lesson plans have helped you, and you’d like to help keep the site free, please consider making a small contribution to help cover the site’s costs. Any help you can give is much appreciated!

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Copyright © 2023 Your English Pal

LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH TEACHERS

tourism esl class

Level: Intermediate (B1-B2)

Type of English: General English

Tags: environment and nature travel and leisure be/get used to doing Article based

Publication date: 23/03/2016

In this lesson, students read about the potential dangers of ecotourism. The worksheet includes a grammar exercise on the structure be/get used to doing something.

Fantastic! Just what I was looking for. I love lesson plans for students of tourism/guiding.

Leave a Comment

Student worksheet

Teacher lesson plan

Save lesson to

In this lesson, students read about the potential dangers of ecotourism. The worksheet includes a grammar exercise on the be/get used to doing something structure.

COURSE PLANS

This comprehensive course plan covers the full range of language needs – listening, role play, vocabulary development.

Worksheets in English for Life course plan

tourism esl class

Type of English: General English Level: Intermediate (B1-B2)

tourism esl class

Type of English: General English Level: Mixed levels

tourism esl class

Make your lessons unforgettable

Did you know that your students can review the target language from our worksheets with our Expemo flashcard app? To let your student know, just enter their email address below (multiple emails can be separated with a comma).

Downsides of tourism

  • Global Issues

Speaking class

tourism esl class

photo of the author

LESSON OVERVIEW

This speaking lesson focuses on talking about tourism and its problems. Students talk about travelling in general and tourism as an industry, watch a video and discuss solutions to the problems. 

This is a Speaking Class worksheet. It includes a variety of tasks that let your students practise their speaking skills. This lesson format does not focus on grammar or vocabulary. Learn more about it here.

WARM-UP & VIDEO

This speaking lesson includes an additional warm-up activity that is also a vocabulary revision . Students receive a list of words and try to create ten pairs of synonyms (e.g. hidden gems and lesser-known spots, tourist attraction and landmark , etc.). There is another warm-up in the lesson which focuses on speaking. Students look at the list of famous places (e.g. Venice, the island of Phuket, the Louvre , etc.) and discuss if they are trending and whether they would like to visit them. After that, students look at two terms , overtourism and responsible tourism , and discuss how they are connected. Students complete some sentences talking about tourism more. Then, they watch a video and compare its messages to their ideas. 

TALKING ABOUT TOURISM AND ITS PROBLEMS

Students have a few more activities and continue talking about tourism and its problems. After watching the video, they discuss questions and say whether they consider themselves responsible tourists. Students also talk about the advantages and disadvantages of tourism, about safety and responsibilities. After the discussion, students take a look at the list of common problems that tourism causes (e.g. local traditions are often altered or simplified to suit tourist preferences ) and say whether they have experienced them where they live or while travelling. Talking about tourism, students also look at the solutions to these problems (e.g. educating tourists, introducing quotas, restricting Airbnb , etc. ) and decide whether they would be effective and whose responsibility they should be: governments, travel agents or tourists. Teachers can also ask students about the implementation of these solutions and encourage them to come up with more ideas.

Subscribe to unlock these and many other Printable & Digital lesson plans with the Unlimited plan

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

' src=

I like the descriptions of the lesson plans I’m sent but have subscribed to a premium plan which apparently doesn’t give access to the actual material. What is the actual benefit of premium?

' src=

Unfortunately, this lesson is part of our Unlimited subscription. Check out these lessons that are available in Premium.

' src=

I added some more prompts / options to question 4, as I feel it can help generate conversation and thus make it easier for my students to focus on all the points in the video. Conversely, I removed some of the options from question 6, as I feel they are a bit repetitive. All in all, it is a very interesting lesson, which can easily be adapted for anything from 45 mins to 90 mins teaching time. A big thumbs up from me. Thank you

Thanks for the feedback! I’m glad you enjoyed the lesson and found it adaptable. If you have more suggestions, feel free to share. Thanks again for the thumbs up 🙂

Browse other materials recommended for you

speaking lesson about shopping addiction

How does shopping make you feel?

As shopping is part of everyone’s life, this speaking lesson on shopping addiction won’t leave your students indifferent. Discuss whether it is a serious problem, discover hacks on how to control it and dive into how instant gratification works.

tourism esl class

If humans suddenly vanished…

In this CRC lesson, students read an article about what would happen if humans disappeared, learn new vocabulary, talk about hypothetical situations, and brainstorm more ideas.

tourism esl class

The value of unpaid care work

In this lesson about unpaid work, students watch a video, practise using some verbs and discuss care work in depth. 

ESL lesson on ageing

Ageing: embracing the inevitable

In this ESL lesson on ageing students talk about different aspects of the life of senior citizens. Students discuss mental and physical health, learn about dementia villages by watching a video, and brainstorm ideas.  

double comparatives

Towards a car-free future

This flipped lesson focuses on a grammar topic of double comparatives and a discussion about car-free cities. Students watch a video and work with grammar on their own. In the lesson, they have more speaking practice and creative work. 

tourism esl class

Slacktivism – to engage or not to engage?

In this lesson students discuss the term slacktivism and different forms of activism. They also do a word formation exercise and talk about the article they read at home. 

lesson about protests

Does protest always lead to change?

This lesson includes a lot of speaking practice. Students watch a video about what makes a protest successful and analyse some strategies. 

tourism esl class

Senior roommates

In this lesson, students talk about the idea of senior citizens living together, do a word formation activity, and discuss retirement.

tourism esl class

Are we becoming less materialistic?

In this lesson, students talk about materialism and how the pandemic influenced our view of material gains, and do a transformation task.

Is there a minimum subscription period if I choose a monthly subscription?

No, there’s no minimum required number of subscription months. You can cancel any time you want. Basically, you can sign up and then cancel your subscription the next day, which will mean you have access for 1 month and won’t be charged again.

What currencies can I pay in for my subscription?

Our default currency is USD (American dollar), but you can also pay in EUR (euro), GBP (British pound sterling) or PLN (Polish zloty). You can change the currency you want to pay in at the Pricing page before selecting a subscription plan.

How can I edit an e-lesson plan?

You can get your own editable copy of an e-lesson plan and make changes to it. To do so, either (1) make a copy of it on your Google Drive (preferable method) or (2) download it in a Powerpoint format (but formatting might be a bit off so we can’t guarantee that it will work well).

We are using cookies to give you the best experience on our website, personalize content and analyze website traffic. For these reasons, we may share your site usage data with our social media, and analytics partners. You can find out more about which cookies we are using or switch them off in settings.

Privacy settings

With the slider, you can enable or disable different types of cookies:, this website will:.

  • Remember which cookies group you accepted
  • Essential: Remember your cookie permission setting
  • Essential: Allow session cookies
  • Essential: Gather information you input into a contact forms, newsletter and other forms across all pages
  • Essential: Keep track of what subscription you select to buy
  • Essential: Authenticate that you are logged into your user account

This website won't:

  • Remember your login details
  • Functionality: Remember social media settings
  • Functionality: Remember selected region and country
  • Analytics: Keep track of your visited pages and interaction taken
  • Analytics: Keep track about your location and region based on your IP number
  • Analytics: Keep track of the time spent on each page
  • Analytics: Increase the data quality of the statistics functions
  • Advertising: Tailor information and advertising to your interests based on e.g. the content you have visited before. (Currently we do not use targeting or targeting cookies.
  • Advertising: Gather personally identifiable information such as name and location
  • Advertising: Use information for tailored advertising with third parties
  • Advertising: Allow you to connect to social sites
  • Advertising: Identify device you are using
  • Essential: Keep track of what you input in a shopping cart
  • Essential: Remember language version you selected
  • Advertising: Allow you to connect to social sitesl Advertising: Identify device you are using

Username or Email Address

Remember Me

  • Vacation Rentals
  • Restaurants
  • Things to do
  • Elektrostal Tourism
  • Elektrostal Hotels
  • Elektrostal Bed and Breakfast
  • Elektrostal Vacation Rentals
  • Flights to Elektrostal
  • Elektrostal Restaurants
  • Things to Do in Elektrostal
  • Elektrostal Travel Forum
  • Elektrostal Photos
  • Elektrostal Map
  • All Elektrostal Hotels
  • Elektrostal Hotel Deals
  • Elektrostal Hostels
  • Elektrostal Business Hotels
  • Elektrostal Family Hotels
  • Elektrostal Spa Resorts
  • 3-stars Hotels in Elektrostal
  • Elektrostal Hotels with Banquet hall
  • Elektrostal Hotels with Game room
  • Hotels near Karaoke Bar
  • Hotels near Museum of Labor Glory
  • Hotels near Viki Cinema
  • Hotels near Galereya Kino
  • Hotels near Statue of Lenin
  • Hotels near Park of Culture and Leisure
  • Hotels near Electrostal History and Art Museum
  • Hotels near Banya
  • Hotels near Museum and Exhibition Center
  • Hotels near SmokyGrove
  • Hotels near Papa Lounge Bar
  • Hotels near Shorkistry Station
  • Hotels near 43 Km Station
  • Hotels near Elektrogorsk Station
  • Hotels near Kovrigino Station
  • Hotels near Pavlovskiy Posad Station
  • Hotels near Khrapunovo Station
  • Hotels near Elektrostal Station
  • Hotels near Metallurg Station
  • Hotels near Fryazevo Station
  • Hotels near Noginsk Station
  • Zhukovsky International Airport Hotels
  • Vnukovo Airport Hotels
  • Domodedovo Airport Hotels
  • Disney's Coronado Springs Resort
  • Haven Riviera Cancun
  • Moon Palace The Grand - Cancun
  • Secrets Akumal Riviera Maya
  • Disney's Animal Kingdom Lodge
  • Hotel Riu Republica
  • Hotel Chester
  • Lombok Senggigi Hotel
  • Giraffe Manor
  • Dreams Royal Beach Punta Cana
  • Secrets The Vine Cancun
  • Moon Palace Jamaica
  • Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino
  • Hotel Riu Palace Cabo San Lucas
  • Hilton Tulum Riviera Maya All-Inclusive Resort
  • Popular All-Inclusive Resorts
  • Popular Beach Resorts
  • Popular Family Resorts
  • Popular All-Inclusive Hotels
  • Popular Hotels With Waterparks
  • Popular Honeymoon Resorts
  • Popular Luxury Resorts
  • Popular All-Inclusive Family Resorts
  • Popular Golf Resorts
  • Popular Spa Resorts
  • Popular Cheap Resorts
  • GreenLeaders
  • Elektrostal
  • Things to Do
  • Travel Stories
  • Rental Cars
  • Add a Place
  • Travel Forum
  • Travelers' Choice
  • Help Center
  • Europe    
  • Russia    
  • Central Russia    
  • Moscow Oblast    
  • Elektrostal    

Yantar-Siti

tourism esl class

View prices for your travel dates

Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.

YANTAR-SITI - Hotel Reviews (Elektrostal, Russia)

THE 10 BEST Things to Do in Elektrostal

Things to do in elektrostal.

  • Good for Kids
  • Good for a Rainy Day
  • Good for Couples
  • Budget-friendly
  • Good for Big Groups
  • Honeymoon spot
  • Good for Adrenaline Seekers
  • Hidden Gems
  • Adventurous
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.

tourism esl class

1. Electrostal History and Art Museum

tourism esl class

2. Statue of Lenin

tourism esl class

3. Park of Culture and Leisure

4. museum and exhibition center.

tourism esl class

5. Museum of Labor Glory

tourism esl class

7. Galereya Kino

8. viki cinema, 9. smokygrove.

tourism esl class

10. Gandikap

11. papa lounge bar, 12. karaoke bar.

  • Statue of Lenin
  • Electrostal History and Art Museum
  • Park of Culture and Leisure
  • Museum and Exhibition Center
  • Museum of Labor Glory

Elektrostal Attractions Information

IMAGES

  1. Pin on Englisch

    tourism esl class

  2. TOURIST ATTRACTIONS 1 worksheet

    tourism esl class

  3. 12 Travelling (for English classroom) ideas

    tourism esl class

  4. Travel Role-Plays

    tourism esl class

  5. Esl Lesson Plans Travel And Tourism

    tourism esl class

  6. Travel And Tourism Worksheets Pdf

    tourism esl class

VIDEO

  1. Taj hotel Mumbai #tajhotelmumbai

  2. Top 10 Most Beautiful Places In Switzerland 🇨🇭

  3. Travelling Vocabulary

  4. Tourism Class_C11.2.2_Tour Guide in Lawang Sewu Semarang

  5. English Lesson #97

  6. English Lesson #93

COMMENTS

  1. 315 Tourism English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

    Tourisme - Travelling This worksheet is meant for adults or older teens. The students are going to read a short text about travelling and then have to answer questions about the text and thei... 8756 uses mimosa1978 Tourism wordsearch This worksheet is about tourism. There is a vocabulary and a questionnaire to work with a partner. 4326 uses

  2. ESL Lesson Plan on Tourism

    Tourism is booming and the number of tourists is expected to rise by 50 per cent in the next decade. Old Holland is an idyllic area that matches people's image of Dutch life from a slower, bygone age. There are windmills everywhere and locals live in beautifully preserved, traditional wooden houses.

  3. English Tourism Vocabulary and Exercises for Any Traveler

    (Download) Basic Vocabulary to Get You Started Here's a list of common tourism-related English words. You might be asked questions with these words, or you might need to use them yourself. Make sure you're familiar with them and can use them in full sentences. Attractions — places for tourists to see

  4. Ethical Tourism

    This free ESL lesson plan on ethical tourism has been designed for adults and young adults at an intermediate (B1/B2) to advanced (C1/C2) level and should last around 45 to 60 minutes for one student. The rise of the ethical consumer has also started to have an effect on the travel industry.

  5. Travelling Lesson Plans

    This worksheet focuses on speaking about air travel. Students answer different questions, watch and discuss a video. They also read and discuss short stories and create their own. With this tourism lesson plan, students discuss gastro-tourism, watch a video and learn vocabulary related to food.

  6. Teacher's Corner: Travel and Tourism

    Week 1 - Around the World Week 2 - What to See in Town Week 3 - Planning a Trip Week 4 - Over-tourism Week 1 begins the month with a Pecha Kucha style presentation. In these fast-paced presentations, students must describe an around-the-world trip in three minutes using only six presentation slides.

  7. ESL Lesson Plans For Teachers Topic: Travel And Leisure

    60 min Ethical travel Intermediate (B1-B2) The topic of this lesson is ethical travel. Students will listen to a radio programme about "voluntourism" and get the chance to discuss the pros and cons of combining volunteering and tourism. Students will learn level-appropriate language to talk about ethical travel with a focus on adjectives.

  8. ESL Resources for Travel and Tourism Lessons

    3 min January 31, 2023 The topic of travel and tourism is a classic theme in any ESL classroom, whether it's an online class or in a traditional setting. To help both teachers and students to have the best lessons possible, take a look at our selection of ESL Resources for Travel and Tourism Lessons! ESL Resources for Travel and Tourism Lessons

  9. Travel & Tourism (Intermediate ESL/EFL Lesson Plan)

    Travel Lesson Plan (ESL): Intermediate: Warm-up (Pair Work) 1) Where are you planning to go for your next holiday? 2) Is there a place you'd never visit again? Where and why? 3) Do you prefer traveling independently or with a group on an organized tour? 4) What do you know of the following countries: Uganda, Myanmar, Ukraine, and Jordan?

  10. ESL Lesson Plans For Teachers Topic: Tourism Industry

    45 min Tourism and politics Advanced (C1-C2) In this advanced lesson plan, students read an article about the role of politics in the tourism industry. Activities focus on key words and phrases and understanding the text. Students discuss the worksheet topic at the end of the lesson. 45 min Spanish city to ban holiday rentals Mixed levels

  11. Travel & Tourist Destinations (Advanced ESL Lesson Plan)

    Download the Travel & Tourism ESL lesson plan here: Travel-Tourism-ESL-Advanced-21052012.doc. Note: This plan is out of date.An updated (2022) travel lesson plan for advanced students can be found here. Travel Lesson Plan (ESL): Advanced. Travel Lesson Plan (ESL): Warm-up (Pair Work) 1) Where are you planning to go for your next holiday?

  12. ESL hotel, aviation & tourism lesson plans for ESL Teachers

    Hotels, restaurants, airports and airlines all have specialized language requirements that the worksheets below aim to cover in an instructive and entertaining fashion. 5 travel and tourism language and vocabulary lessons. 8 hotel vocabulary and speaking skills exercises (PDF) 5 airport and airline vocabulary and language skills exercises with ...

  13. Terrific Travel and Tourism Language and Vocabulary Lessons

    1 Talking about travel and culture speaking lesson This is an ESL speaking and writing lesson for practicing basic language for talking about travel and culture. First, students complete the sentences with the vocabulary at the bottom of the page. Then they give their own opinions about what they like and dislike about traveling.

  14. Overtourism

    This free ESL lesson plan on overtourism has been designed for adults and young adults at an intermediate (B1/B2) to advanced (C1/C2) level and should last around 45 to 60 minutes for one student. As nations become wealthier, their people travel more.

  15. Ecotourism: ESL/EFL Lesson Plan and Worksheet

    Share. Level: Intermediate (B1-B2) Type of English: General English. Tags: environment and nature travel and leisure be/get used to doing Article based. Publication date: 23/03/2016. In this lesson, students read about the potential dangers of ecotourism. The worksheet includes a grammar exercise on the structure be/get used to doing something.

  16. Downsides of tourism

    class Too Many People Want to Travel Add to saved lessons Olia | Sep 06, 2023 LESSON OVERVIEW This speaking lesson focuses on talking about tourism and its problems. Students talk about travelling in general and tourism as an industry, watch a video and discuss solutions to the problems. B2 / Upper Intermediate 45 min

  17. Travel English: Vocabulary, phrases & expressions for traveling

    No thanks, I'm a tourist! ... Discover the best conversational English classes to boost your English speaking skills, and get comfortable with any conversation. English vocabulary; July 3, 2023; Collocations in English: Adverb + Adjective. Learn English with several details. Exceed your English grammar and word usage skills easily after ...

  18. Tourism English

    Join Customized Courses for F&B. Learn with AI (GPT-4) Discover your Hotel & Tourism & Foodservice English skills with our . Explore the next steps on your English journey. Prove your knowledge and continue learning. All courses are tailored to different proficiency levels, ensuring that you find the perfect fit for your current language skills.

  19. THE 10 BEST Things to Do in Elektrostal

    1. Electrostal History and Art Museum. 2. Statue of Lenin. 3. Park of Culture and Leisure. 4. Museum and Exhibition Center. 5.

  20. Elektrostal, Russia 2024: Best Places to Visit

    Elektrostal Tourism: Tripadvisor has 796 reviews of Elektrostal Hotels, Attractions, and Restaurants making it your best Elektrostal resource. ... By Hotel Class. 3-Star Hotels in Elektrostal. Popular Elektrostal Categories. ... This is the version of our website addressed to speakers of English in the United States.

  21. YANTAR-SITI

    Write a review. Hotel Yantar-City is located in Elektrostal. The front desk is open 24 hours a day and offers free Wi-Fi. Guests can visit the restaurant or order room service. The hotel has a shared lounge and luggage storage. Rooms are equipped with a flat-screen TV and a private bathroom. All rooms are equipped with a refrigerator. Read more.

  22. THE 10 BEST Things to Do in Elektrostal (Updated 2024)

    Top Things to Do in Elektrostal, Russia: See Tripadvisor's 796 traveller reviews and photos of Elektrostal tourist attractions. Find what to do today, this weekend, or in February. ... All Elektrostal Hotels Elektrostal Hotel Deals By Hotel Type By Hotel Class Popular Elektrostal Categories Near Landmarks Near Train Stations Near Airports ...